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Diamond Without Certificate


mikechu
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recently my friend and I visited a jewelry shop which is one of the reputable pearl shop in Japan. Since my friend is the friend of the shop mgr and thus he offered us a very nice discount in buying the diamond ring. I am very keen on buy one for my girlfriend, however, the diamonds got no individual certificate. There are only some cards on the shop showing their diamonds come from De beers and the diamonds are cut by the specialists of the Pearl shop.

 

I m happy for the discount but I also concern on the value of a diamond w/o a cert. What will it be if a diamond w/o any cert.? Appreciate so much for any feedback, thanks much.

 

Mike

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First, certs, or more accuratly lab reports, are not gaurentees of grade, they are opinions and groups like GIA are very agressive about pointing out that the report is an opinion.. After that it comes down to trust with your jeweler..

 

Many jewelers accuratly grade and sell their diamonds without reports every day.. Some aren't so accurate.. If a second opinion will help you with your purchase you have several options open to you..

 

You can take the diamond to a qualified appraiser and ask his opinion.. This will cost you a few dollars but may put you more at ease..

 

Or you could make a deal with the jeweler.. He can send the diamond in for a lab report from a lab like GIA.. If it comes back as he graded, you buy the diamond and pay for the report.. If it comes back as something else you are under no obligation to pay for the diamond or the report.. Of course the jeweler could also tell you no..

 

Or, option #3, if you trust this jeweler and love the diamond and are happy with the price, forget the rest and buy it and be happy with it..

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First, certs, or more accuratly lab reports, are not gaurentees of grade, they are opinions and groups like GIA are very agressive about pointing out that the report is an opinion.. After that it comes down to trust with your jeweler..

 

Many jewelers accuratly grade and sell their diamonds without reports every day.. Some aren't so accurate.. If a second opinion will help you with your purchase you have several options open to you..

 

You can take the diamond to a qualified appraiser and ask his opinion.. This will cost you a few dollars but may put you more at ease..

 

Or you could make a deal with the jeweler.. He can send the diamond in for a lab report from a lab like GIA.. If it comes back as he graded, you buy the diamond and pay for the report.. If it comes back as something else you are under no obligation to pay for the diamond or the report.. Of course the jeweler could also tell you no..

 

Or, option #3, if you trust this jeweler and love the diamond and are happy with the price, forget the rest and buy it and be happy with it..

 

 

I can't agree more, but I would still recommend buying a diamond with a Cert. One more option is to ask the jeweler if he has a return policy so you can have it appraised yourself if you like the results then good, if not return it. Make sure to pay with a C.C.

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Well yeah, the purpose of the certificate for the buyer is to make sure you're getting what you're supposed to be getting. Normally I'd say don't buy one without a certificate, but if your friend works there and you trust him then that's all you need. However, this is a friend of a friend that works there which is different.

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I am really prejudiced against most lab reports.. There are so many junk reports out there that trust with the jeweler is primary in my opinion.. You can even get reports and appraisals on the internet by just typing in some information.. No one even looks at your stuff before giving you a report.. Then you have all the various mall reports that are worth less than the paper they wasted to print them on, etc etc etc..

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I am really prejudiced against most lab reports.. There are so many junk reports out there that trust with the jeweler is primary in my opinion.. You can even get reports and appraisals on the internet by just typing in some information.. No one even looks at your stuff before giving you a report.. Then you have all the various mall reports that are worth less than the paper they wasted to print them on, etc etc etc..

Well my diamond came with a GIA dossier, and I took it to a very experienced independent appraiser in my area while it was loose just to verify it since I was a little leery about buying online. I had him grade it without looking at the report. The color, clarity, carat, and cut he gave it were all exactly the same grades as the report said. The only differences was that his calipers measured the diameter slightly smaller (probably from not measuring at exactly a 90 degree angle and the faceted girdle threw it off some) and his description of the inclusions was slightly different (GIA report said cloud while he described it as needles, but a group of needles is a cloud).

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Dear All

 

Thanks for all your replies. Since I hav no ideas on diamond (except those 4C info learned from this website), so I would like to know if there is 2nd hand price on the diamond and how to asses the price, if any. Since I am thinking I may not have much budget to buy an excellent one, but hope someday when I have more money I can trade in the old one and buy a new one for her. If so, can I get the old one to any jewelry shops to exchange another diamond item or get money back?

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A fair number of jewelers offer trade in programs for things they sell and/or will buy stones from you that you purchased somewhere else. It’s important to note that these are NOT the same thing. Buying a stone from one place and trading it at another almost always results in disappointment. If you are expecting to want to trade in your purchase, read the rules of the trade up program carefully as part of your process for shopping for a jeweler before you buy the first diamond. The fine print is important and it has more to do with the jeweler than the diamond. Do not expect that you can buy a diamond from one source and get all or even most of your money back from another dealer at trade in.

 

Neil

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A fair number of jewelers offer trade in programs for things they sell and/or will buy stones from you that you purchased somewhere else. It’s important to note that these are NOT the same thing. Buying a stone from one place and trading it at another almost always results in disappointment. If you are expecting to want to trade in your purchase, read the rules of the trade up program carefully as part of your process for shopping for a jeweler before you buy the first diamond. The fine print is important and it has more to do with the jeweler than the diamond. Do not expect that you can buy a diamond from one source and get all or even most of your money back from another dealer at trade in.

 

Neil

 

 

Thanks much, Neil

 

seems shopping around is very important. But I have no clue to compare their prices and quality of diamonds presented in different jewelry shops, how can I compare and get the best possible price?

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Mike,

 

There’s not a short answer to your question. There’s not even a long answer that would apply t all situations but I’ll try to give you a few clues on how to proceed.

 

For starters, I think your stated objective of finding the ‘best possible price’ is ill placed and going to undermine you. The best deal is not the one that quotes the lowest prices. It’s the one that delivers what you want for the least cost. Unfortunately, these are rarely the same. It's always a balancing act and much of the process involves deciding what you are willing to compromise on in order to do a little better on something else. Since diamonds are largely a blind item where you are going to be relying on the advice of your jeweler, this makes the first step one of shopping for a jeweler, not shopping for a diamond.

 

Not everyone does this the same way and there are a variety of tactics used. There is a thread in the FAQ section about this that may have some helpful thoughts. Personally, I tend to do this with almost every important thing I buy from cars to appliances. My process goes something like this.

 

1) Educate yourself on what makes one diamond different than another that’s superficially similar. Do that by reading the free resources here and elsewhere, listening to sales pitches, reading the tutorials on various dealers’ websites, even reading some of the books on the topic. Reading the first 10 pages of questions & answers in this forum would probably be helpful. When you find things that disagree, and you will, make note of what the issue seems to be and how the various information sources deal with it. This is where you need to add some common sense. Sometimes there’s honest disagreement about what is important and what isn’t, sometimes different people value different things and some folks are just plain wrong. You NEED to develop this filter. It takes a little bit of work but it’s not really all that hard.

 

2) Pick a dealer that seems reasonably likely to suit your shopping style and ask them questions. They may have a shop that's in a convenient location for you, they may be the store where your father shopped, they may have a terrific Google placement program or you may just luck into them. Everyone takes a different path. Part of this is the education step above and part is asking some of those questions where you already know the answer and that they might be inclined to lie or obfuscate. The discussion here is likely to be about a particular diamond and it’s often very helpful as part of step 1 above. If they can convince you that you were wrong about what you thought you knew, you’ve got a good clue. Read their advertising material. Remember, you’re not shopping for a diamond, your shopping for a jeweler. If they don’t pass the test, take a hike. It doesn’t matter if they have the cheapest prices you’ve ever heard … If you can’t trust what they tell you, it’s a trap. Guaranteed. Repeat this step as necessary until you find a jeweler that seems to deserve your business and who has a style of communication that suits you.

 

3) Read the fine print. Check out the signs in the store, read the details on their website, read the details of the trade in and financing programs, etc. What happens if you’re unhappy? How long have you got to inspect the piece and make a return? How will repairs be handled?

 

4) Go home and do some research on the jeweler. Google them. Check you’re your state to see who owns the company and then Google THEM. Check with the BBB. Ask your friends and neighbors about them. Even ask their neighbors about them. Most stores that have been around for a while leave a trail and you should be able to spot it.

5) Again, if they fail this test, start over at #2. Repeat as needed.

 

6) When you find the right jeweler, it gets’ easier. Tell them what your requirements are and listen to their advice. Pick a diamond and buy it.

 

7) If you’re still nervous, get it appraised by an independent appraiser while you’re still within your return period. Shop for your appraiser with the same sort of approach and use them as a ‘second opinion’ to confirm that you did it right.

 

8) Next time it will be easier. You’ve got a birthday, Christmas and anniversary gift to deal with every year for the rest of your life. The chances of jewelry coming up again is pretty high but now you’ve already got a source worked out.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Hi Neil

 

Thanks for your advice, it is really useful and reasonable advice. Your suggestion of shopping for a honest and good jeweler is very convincing and so I decide to work on this way with studying more about picking my diamond.

 

Again, thanks much for your replies. ;)

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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