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Another Question About Ags 000


DrJim
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I appreciate everyone's response to my last post. I took it to heart and I have been scouring the city's jewelers looking at a lot of diamonds. Now I have run up against a wall. I like the idea of purchasing from a local dealer where I can see the diamond. I have it narrowed down to 3 diamonds from 3 different jewelers. The first one is from Jared. Its an AGS 000, G, SI1 (one of their "peerless") diamonds. It certainly looks nice and has a Gemex report which shows its great brillance. The second one is from a dealer with an Isee machine where he showed me how great this particular diamond was and scored a 9.6/10 on the machine. It also was an AGS 000, F color, VS2. The third is from another jeweler that has been in the business for a long time. Its an AGS 000, F color, VS2. He has no special reports except the AGS report and no fancy machine. They're all close in price 7500-8500.

 

I guess the questions I now have is: are all AGS 000's given the same carat size, color and clarity going to have the same brillance/sparkle? Is it worth it to buy from someone who has a fancy machine to show off the diamond or a special report from someplace like Gemex, or would the 3rd guy's AGS 000 do well on those other tests just given its report from AGS. Ok, lots of info and writing for just a couple questions. Thanks alot for your help . . . getting closer to finally making a purchase.

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AGS-000’s can have very different looks but will all be bright and pretty. Use your eyes to see which one suits your taste the best. I’m not a huge fan of the Gemex and similar systems but there are others here who like it and it’s very helpful if you’re trying to buy a stone without the opportunity to look at it and compare it with others. They are handy for what they are but personally I wouldn’t pay much of a premium for it.

 

AGS changed the rules on AGS-000 at the beginning of 2006 and it’s considerably narrower now. You will find that post-2006 stones are much more similar to one another than with stones graded under the older system. It’s likely that all 3 stones are recent but it may be worth checking the date on the report to be sure.

 

Neil

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Thanks, Neil. I appreciate your input. I actually just got back from going to the guy's place with the Isee2 machine. I had temporarily bought the Jared stone I liked with in store credit, with the intention of returning it if I found something better. The stone the guy I saw today had was an AGS 000, F, SI2 and it scored a 9.6 on the scale. The Jared stone was an AGS 000, G, SI1 and only scored an 8.4. I didn't want to go below an SI1 in clarity, but the guy showed me the swirl/cloud in the middle of the stone and it didn't seem to be noticable without the scope. Anyways, it was fun going around and researching and looking at diamonds at first, but now I guess I'm starting to get frustrated. I think I'm being too picky in finding the "perfect" diamond in my price range. Again, thanks for your help.

 

- Jim

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I guess the questions I now have is: are all AGS 000's given the same carat size, color and clarity going to have the same brillance/sparkle? Is it worth it to buy from someone who has a fancy machine to show off the diamond or a special report from someplace like Gemex, or would the 3rd guy's AGS 000 do well on those other tests just given its report from AGS. Ok, lots of info and writing for just a couple questions. Thanks alot for your help . . . getting closer to finally making a purchase.

 

Not all AGS 000's face up the same. True also for GIA Triple X's.

 

Depending on the facet size, facet angle, and facet alignment of the 58 facets that comprise the round brilliant shape, a diamond's display of brilliance (white light), dispersion (colored light), and scintillation (sparklies) will vary in the intensity and distribution across the surface area of the stone. You may see an even distribution of small and intense pinpoint flashes of light or you may see bolder and larger light spots with more pronounced dispersion. Slight variances in the facets size, angle, and alignment will alter the face up look of the diamond and the type of light being refracted to your eye. Preference is a matter of personal taste.

 

If you're shopping on line then IMO the Brilliancescope, Idealscope, and photos do have important functional utility and enable you to 'see' the diamond to a certain extent. An additional and very important benefit is that Vendors using these technologies do have the diamonds in-house and can therefore answer any questions you may have.

 

I'm sure that in your personal inspection of different diamonds you have noticed nuanced differences in light performance. What combination or "look" did you prefer?

 

The bottom line is trust your eyes.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Neil made a good comment about checking the age of the certificates.

 

I don't have what I'd consider a trained eye by any means, but I do have very sharp eyesight and have done the store-to-store thing too looking at different diamonds. Hey Jim, I'm curious... did you see any noticeable difference between the AGS 000 diamonds you looked at? Or was it just a matter of which machine said what?

 

Because if you put an AGS-0 and AGS-1 diamond of same color, carat, and clarity in front of me face up a few inches apart I can't tell which is which with just my unaided eye (unless something is noticably different like one table is 53% and another table is 60%), let alone comparing two or three similar AGS000s like you're doing here. In fact I'd feel pretty safe betting money that most experts wouldn't be able to with just the naked eye either.

 

Did you know that the Isee2's manufacturer (Overseas Diamonds) also sells diamonds that are cut specifically to perform well on the Isee2? In fact a store needs to buy and stock a sufficient quantity of Overseas Diamond's ideal cut diamonds before one can lease the Isee2, and the Isee2 is intended to be a sales aid to close the deal on their diamonds. I personally feel that flashing light at a diamond and measuring the light returned with a machine is a good idea for objectively evaluating diamonds, but you do have to look at a diamond marketing company's motivations for making and leasing something like the Isee2 (or not utilizing something like the more independent Brilliancescope). AGS uses the ASET scope to measure light performance, which is their machine that works much like the Brilliancescope or Isee2, so when you get an AGS-0 diamond know that the light performance has already been measured.

Edited by H and A
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