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Cost Of Laser Drilling


wbishop
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Hi,

 

I have purchased a diamond and it has 1 easily seen black spot.

 

I have been doing some reading on laser drilling and how it can remove or cover up black spots inside the diamond. I am not interested in reselling the diamond or anything of that sort. I just want it to look nicer.

 

The question I have is: How much should I expect to pay (estimate) for a the laser drilling procedure on a 1ct diamond?

 

My other concern is where I can have something like this done? Do major diamond retailers like Zales, Kay, etc. do these procedures for people who bought their diamond elsewhere?

 

Thanks

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Hi,

 

I have purchased a diamond and it has 1 easily seen black spot.

 

I have been doing some reading on laser drilling and how it can remove or cover up black spots inside the diamond. I am not interested in reselling the diamond or anything of that sort. I just want it to look nicer.

 

The question I have is: How much should I expect to pay (estimate) for a the laser drilling procedure on a 1ct diamond?

 

My other concern is where I can have something like this done? Do major diamond retailers like Zales, Kay, etc. do these procedures for people who bought their diamond elsewhere?

 

Thanks

 

 

Laser drilling does not always "remove" the carbon spot(s). It does 'whiten' them and make them less visible to the eye.

 

Two companies here in New York, Ronella and Pearlman's specialize in laser-drilling.

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Most of the companies with the correct equipment are strictly wholesale firms. Talk with a jeweler/gemologist in your neighborhood and they should be able to help you out. As Barry mentioned above, the process doesn't remove the incusions, it just changes the color for certain things. It's a bit tricky to decide when it will help and when it will just add a drill hole without doing any good. Not all things that you see as a black spot are really a black inclusion. Talk to an expert who can see the stone in person for advice about whether it will be helpful in your situation.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Hi everyone!

 

What the laser actually does is drill a channel to the black spot.

The diamond is then boiled in acid, which usually bleaches the black spot to a white one.

As Barry said, this procedure does not nessecarily work on all spotted diamonds.

 

As Neil ( go Subaru Man!) suggested, you'll need to find an expert to assess the inclusion.

Not likely at one of the major sellers you metnioned.

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Hi,

 

You guys are right; non of the major retailers I mentioned had any clue on where I could get a diamond evaluated on whether it would be a good idea to laser drill the diamond or not. I live in a small city and the nearest large city is about 6 hours away. Unfortunately, I don't have the time to drive up there and get this looked at with a real expert.

 

I am curious if there are any online services that may offer diamond clarity enhancements. Would you guys know of any?

 

Thanks

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The diamond was purchased at Union Diamond (www.uniondiamond.com). Their service is very nice; I would recommend it to any one.

 

I just received this diamond about 3 days ago and I have a 30 day return window policy. I think the best idea might be to return it and select a diamond with their help this time.

 

As for the laser drilling, I never did find out where I would be able to get a diamond laser drilled. And after some of the things you guys told me, I wasn't feeling too comfortable with the idea any way.

 

Thanks guys

Edited by wbishop
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If you're not comfortable, return it and ask them to find you a a comparable color/clarity/price diamond with less noticeable inclusions.

 

The process of laser drilling per se is beneficial in that it improves the face-up appearance of the stone rendering it eye-clean without harming the structural integrity of the diamond.

 

Having Union Diamond ascertain whether laser drilling would aid this particular diamond probably involves extra costs of shipping/insurance, etc that you will be asked to pay. If this stone has a lab report it will have to be re-submitted so that this procedure can be added and noted in the comments section. More money for the new lab report and shipping/insurance.

 

Keep this simple and save your money.

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  • 1 month later...

I am not so sure about the above claim that laser drilling 'does not harm the structural integrity of the diamond.' Most high end jewelers I know would disagree and claim any such 'enhancements,' are indeed harmful. Most of them make grand boasts about how they refuse to treat diamonds in thus manner and will not sell you one that has had this done. Any time you punch holes into something, it's changed. And what do you fill this hole up with which you have have now created, perhaps quite deeply into the stone? Diamond putty?

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It doesn't.

 

Before the FTC jumped in to mandate full disclosure of laser drilled treatment due to a very unfortunate contretemps between a NYC Jeweler and his Customer (the Jeweler was wrong), laser drilling was used extensively with positive results and is akin to a diamond cutter adding an extra facet to the diamond.

 

"Filling" or Clarity enhancement is a whole other process.

 

I don't believe anyone shopping with a "high-end jeweler" has in mind to purchase a laser-drilled diamond.

 

Laser drilled diamonds are more appropriate for the proletariet.

Edited by barry
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