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Need Some Help Her!!!


Md2508
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This is what i am looking at right now please let me know what you think. i want it to have a great sparkle and fire to it.

WEIGHT: 1.03 ctsShape and Cut: RoundMeasurements: 6.44-6.51*3.98mmPROPORTIONS Total Depth: 61.5%Table Width: 59%Crown Height: 14%Pavilion Depth: 44%Girdle Thickness: Medium, FacetedFINISH Polish: Good to Very GoodSymmetry: Very GoodCulet: NoneCLARITY GRADE:* SI3Graining: NilCOLOR GRADE:** DFluorescence: None it is an AGS "1" I deal cut

Edited by Md2508
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This is what i am looking at right now please let me know what you think. i want it to have a great sparkle and fire to it.

WEIGHT: 1.03 ctsShape and Cut: RoundMeasurements: 6.44-6.51*3.98mmPROPORTIONS Total Depth: 61.5%Table Width: 59%Crown Height: 14%Pavilion Depth: 44%Girdle Thickness: Medium, FacetedFINISH Polish: Good to Very GoodSymmetry: Very GoodCulet: NoneCLARITY GRADE:* SI3Graining: NilCOLOR GRADE:** DFluorescence: None it is an AGS "1" I deal cut

 

Have you seen the diamond? Your own eyes will tell you the most. If not, and you're considering buying it sight-unseen, get photos and proof of light performance from the seller first.

 

The SI3 clarity indicates it may have been graded by EGL. In many cases the EGL's grading is not as consistent/strict as grading by the GIA or AGS; especially by EGL labs located outside the USA. SI3 is considered by many to be a 'soft' I1 (other labs go from SI2 to I1). If you've seen the diamond and the clarity characteristics are acceptable to you this might be ok, but if you seeking a true 'D' color on principal it would be prudent to have the color verified by an independent appraiser: True Ds are often sent to the GIA for that grade because they will command a higher premium on the market.

 

Describing cut as an AGS 1 Ideal doesn't make sense. In order to be 'Ideal' in cut by AGS standards the diamond would need to have been sent to AGS where it would have earned a grade of '0' (1 is not ideal). It would also need to have 'Ideal' 0 grades in both polish and symmetry. It's possible that the seller is advertising this cut pedigree using a pre-2006 AGS proportions-based system, but it would still need to be in the '0' proportions range to be called ideal in that case (for the record, the new light-performance based metric is a more reliable predictor than the old proportions range).

 

The information above may be useful if you've not seen the diamond. If you have seen it in several lighting conditions and compared it with other candidates of the quality you're seeking you can judge its appearance and performance for yourself.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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The fire and sparkle you are looking for aren’t included in the data you provided. The AGS-1 ideal description is a curious one. It doesn’t tell us much about the stone, it might be wonderful indeed or it might be dead, but it says quite a bit about the dealer. They don’t use the word ideal in the same way that AGS does and, in fact, they aren’t using it in the same way that AGS ever did. That’s ok, they can use whatever scale they wish but then why are they quoting AGS? The only reasons to do this are because either they don’t know any better or they are trying to pull something over on you. I wouldn’t call either of these especially complimentary.

 

I’m going to guess by the peculiar diction and highlighting in your message that this was cut and pasted from an online ad somewhere. If you link directly to the ad, people may be able to give you better comments about it. Although I won’t discuss specific dealers or specific offers without examining the stone and without a full understanding of the deal at hand but there are others here who are less restrained than I. You may be able to find some comparable offers in the database here that you can use to check if the pricing is in line with what you’re expecting. Remember in your comparison that SI3 means I-1 to the major labs and that D sometimes means E or even F.

 

Neil

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Hi everyone!

 

I would say it's like putting up a photo of a shiny brand new Ferrari when you're selling a beat up '73 Pinto.

 

There's little chance the diamond the seller is offering looks anything like the one in the Sample photo.

 

 

As a buyer, it's realisitic to expect a decent looking one carat for $2700- but it will have things about it which make it cost so little.

Might be a something which is acceptable- maybe an imperfection you can't easily see.

OR- it could be something that makes the diamond totally undesirable.

Some diamonds are simply dull.

EGL calling SI3 means it is an I1.

It could have an ugly imperfection, right where you don't want it.

 

But it will have something.

 

Calling this diamond "Ideal" cut is just another abuse of the term.

Edited by diamondsbylauren
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I’m not as fond of pictures as David and some others here. The problem is that a photograph taken out of context can be terribly deceptive. Good photos of bad stones look better than bad photos of good stones. There are a few things that I can tell from the photo that are helpful.

 

1) It doesn’t appear to be damaged, at least when the picture was taken.

2) The red circles are probably intended to highlight the grade setting inclusions. If this is an unaltered picture of a stone that EGL called SI3, I’m impressed.

3) The optical symmetry is at least pretty good.

 

I think you’re pretty much on the right track. Choosing a dealer that suits your fancy, choosing a stone from their offerings that seems promising, check the details to see if it fails any obvious rejection criteria. The next step is to order it in and look at it. See if it sings to you. Show it to an expert. Show it to your friends, your mother, your astrologer and anyone else whose opinion you value but don’t forget the step of looking at it yourself. You’re trying to decide if it’s the right stone for you and your vote is the most important one. Assuming that the description is accurate, you already know that the price is right after all. It looks like your dealer will give you 10 days to do this and you should take ‘em up on it. Carefully read their return policy before you buy and then comply with the terms. I suspect that your chances of being happy are pretty good with either one of the stones you linked to.

 

Neil

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Well, it might, or it might not....

 

Does the seller claim to have the diamond?

Can they provide additional photos?

 

Yes- some real photos could certainly be informative.

 

Neil- I'm extremely fond of photos that are descriptive. The one we're looking at here is not at all descriptive.

It's a single image, in black and white.

The markings obscure the areas they are trying to highlight......

No other angles or lighting is offered.

If this is the only photo offered, then no, it does not tell a lot.

 

 

If the seller actually has the diamond, they'd be able to provide additional photos.

The inability to do this is telling indeed.

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