Jump to content

Is This A Good Buy/diamond?


pavielle
 Share

Recommended Posts

If it's a local B&M store or other quality dealer and you get some support with that, probably. If it's a no frills Internet dealer, I suggest you beat them up a bit. Go to the 'find online jeweler' link at the top of the page ane enter in you specs. You'll notice that there are 2 dealers here listing that very stone for a few hundred dollars less. B)

 

Spend some of the money you save on an appraisal to answer the question of whether this is a good diamond. There's not enough information available for that. You'll still have enough money left over to pay for the presentation dinner. Have you seen the stone? Do you love it?

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not seen the diamond yet. It is with an Internet dealer who has pretty good credentials. They send you the diamond and you have 2 days to get it appraised. If it is not to your liking, you can send it back Fedex, and they pay for it. They do not charge you until you say it's a deal (within those 2 days). I've looked at stores who are outrageously priced, I've also looked extensively on the internet and hadn't seen anyone cheaper. But I did not see the link for the "find online jeweler" until Neil pointed it out. So I will try that also. But if I find a better price, is this a quality diamond ? (sight unseen) Am I using the correct criteria?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

2 days isn't very long to have any diamond appraised and to make a sound decision as to if you want to keep it. There are many other vendors that offer a 10 to 30 day money back guarantee.

 

Ask the supplier to take some images of the stone for you and perhaps compare it to another candidate in the same price range. Two princess cuts with similar specs can still look pretty different. Having a comparison is usually helpful, in my opinion.

 

All the best!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 days is EXTREMELY short notice. Make sure to set you appointment with the appraiser in advance, like even before you place the order. Many are very busy people and won't be able to squeeze you in with this schedule.

 

By all means, use the dealer you like. Use the advertisements here to beat them up a little bit on price. Most have a 'price matching' program for other dealers and it's likely that the two advertised here are the exact same diamond. You can tell by matching the GIA report number. It's hard to be more comparable than that! They are both pretty large companies and I'm sure the dealer you chose will be familar with them.

 

Is it a quality diamond? I wouldn't be able to answer that without seeing and inspecting it and neither can anyone else, including the people who are selling it without looking. That's a big part of what the appraisal session is for.

 

Neil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's fairly common for several of the 'virtual' dealers to be offering the exact same stone at slightly different prices and with slightly different terms of sale. This is because the stone is actually owned by someone else entirely and the dealers are copying the information from the database where the original seller listed it. When someone buys it, it will get sold to the dealer who made the deal and shipped to the consumer. Some will have the owner ship it to the dealer first for inspection, some will ship it to a 3rd party, like an appraiser, for inspection and some will have it shipped directly to the customer with no inspection at all. Not surprisingly, the later is usually the least expensive but comes with certain risks. B)

 

While the stone is out for examination, it will be listed as unavailable on the sites (correction, it SHOULD be listed as unavailable, how quickly things get updated depends on the site). If the customer buys it and expires the return period without asking for a refund the stone is marked as sold, deleted from the list, everyone moves on to the next deal. In the best circumstances it works pretty well and is a nicely efficient way to sell stones. When it doesn't work, it can be a bit of a pain because of the appraisal fees, shipping logistics and general stress of stretching out the whole shopping process.

 

Neil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not seen the diamond yet. It is with an Internet dealer who has pretty good credentials. They send you the diamond and you have 2 days to get it appraised. If it is not to your liking, you can send it back Fedex, and they pay for it. They do not charge you until you say it's a deal (within those 2 days). I've looked at stores who are outrageously priced, I've also looked extensively on the internet and hadn't seen anyone cheaper. But I did not see the link for the "find online jeweler" until Neil pointed it out. So I will try that also. But if I find a better price, is this a quality diamond ? (sight unseen) Am I using the correct criteria?

 

Price is of course an important consideration, but so is quality. There is no way for the Seller to know this as the diamond is drop-shipped directly to you from the manufacturer/wholesaler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, bottom line, no matter how great the diamond seems on paper, it could be quite different in person. So, I'm not comfortable only having 2 days to get it appraised. I will continue to look for the right diamond with the 30 day guarantee. Thanks for the input. I'm sure I'll be back with questions again...!

Lori

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, bottom line, no matter how great the diamond seems on paper, it could be quite different in person. So, I'm not comfortable only having 2 days to get it appraised. I will continue to look for the right diamond with the 30 day guarantee. Thanks for the input. I'm sure I'll be back with questions again...!

Lori

 

Agree that 2 days is pretty slim. I also suggest that using a seller who actually sees and inspects the diamond in person - as well as providing you with photos and other info before sending it to you - is of prime importance.

Edited by JohnQuixote
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, I have photos of diamonds graded I1 by the GIA. In person, these looked fabulous. (The Oval, Letter E, has a carbon spot designated by the red 1) The camera, on the other hand, catches EVERYTHING. The key to finding a good I1 is cut and it is having the perseverance to find that I1 diamond that doesn't have a big dark booger right smack under the table but finds that diamond that gets you one where the inclusion doesn't cause sparkle interuptus or isn't "in-your-face" obvious.

 

 

I1example.jpg

 

Here's what you need to look for to find a good I1 diamond

 

--Work with a dealer with whom you feel a sense of trust

 

--Work with a dealer who handpicks the diamond and has seen enough he/she knows a good cut from 20 paces away and on top of it

 

--Work with a dealer who will send you photos, more than one, of the diamond

 

--Work with a dealer willing to point out inclusions

 

Example of a good I1 vivid yellow

 

107111a.JPG107e.JPG

 

Example of a pretty darn awesome I2.(there aren't many of these!) The color helps in both these cases and the flaws are highlighted after.

 

85g.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
  • Create New...