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GIA cut grade


Tamra
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Hello,

 

I am reviewing diamonds online and had a question about depth percentage. Here is the info from the GIA report:

 

Measurements: 7.28-7.32 x 4.26

Carat Weight: 1.35

Color: G

Clarity: SI2

Cut Grade: Very Good

 

Depth: 58.4%

Table: 59%

Crown Angle: 33%

Crown Height: 13%

Pavilion Angle: 40.6%

Pavilion Depth: 43%

Star Length: 55%

Lower Half: 75%

Girgle: Thin to Medium , Faceted

Cutlet: None

 

Polish: Very Good

Symmetry: Excellent

Fourescence: None

 

My question is this- How can this diamond have a cut grade of "very good" with such a low depth percentage? All of the diamonds I have reviewed in this weight range have a smaller diameter. Doesn't the cut grade give you and idea of the beauty of the diamond (brilliance, fire, scintillation, etc)? Its seems that with this depth percentage you would have a fisheye effect. The company does offer an inspection period, but I want to be able to narrow down my choices to avoid paying several shipping charges and appraiser fees (I plan to take the diamond to the appraiser to verify it is the same one listed on the report).

 

One more question. Has anyone ever heard of the Tucson Show? My sister goes there annually to purchase merchandise for her business. She says diamond vendors gather there from all over the United States and I should check them out before I make my purchase. Any opinions, suggestions?

 

Thanks in advance

 

 

Tamra

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Hi Tamra,

I doubt that a diamond of 58.4% depth would have a visable "fish eye"- although it is possible.

Sometimes a slightly shallow round diamond can look awesome, sometimes not.

Beauty is still in the eyes of the beholder- a series of good, detailed photos would go a long way to allowing you the luxury of making a choice based on visual facotrs.

 

There's a gem show each year in Tuscon- largest specific gem show in the US, I believe.

I also believe the main show is restricted to tradespeople.

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Crown angle on this stone is 33 degrees which could compensate for the shallow pavillion and possibly the reason it received a VG Cut Grade from GIA.

 

Should look good.

 

Shallow pavillions often go together with shallow Crowns ( 30 degrees or less) and do not look good at all.

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The last week of January through the first week of February is show time in Tucson. It's a hoot. Jewelers, gem dealers, importers, exporters programmers, display makers and everyone who sells anything that they think has to do with the jewelry business comes together to try and sell things to each other. It's a great time and I go every year. That doesn't make it a good place to shop, particularly as a consumer. The point of the Tucson shows it to see exotic things, to meet with vendors that you rarely see in person and to enjoy the Arizona sunshine. All good reasons but, if all you're looking for a deal on a diamond, it's a waste of your money to go there.

 

check out www.tucsonshowguide.com for lots of advertisements about the various shows going on at that time. David's right that many of the shows have restricted access but there are quite a few that are open to the public.

 

Book you're hotel soon if you decide to go. Every hotel in southern Arizona sells out for show week. Rental cars get pretty scarce too.

 

Neil

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Neil-I don't agree that Good means bad. If you are referring to a round, I've not seen as many rounds with GIA reports because we don't have many rounds. So perhaps it is true with this shape. I feel sure you've seen more of these than I have.

 

But I've seen some killer emerald, pear, oval and heart shapes that only have Good on the GIA Report. One in particular I love. It is one of the absolutely most stunning jaw dropper diamonds I have ever seen. It has Good on the report and it is an unbelievable work of art. So I guess when I see diamonds like this rated Good, I have to question that Symmetry grade as being representative of the "look" of the diamond.

 

204a.JPG

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Yes, I thought you were referring to symmetry. I promise I know the difference and know what the cut grade is. But I also promise I don't know what crown angle goes with what size pavillion or profess to be an expert on determining what a diamond looks like from paper. I will never get that. I just know what works when I see it.

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But I also promise I don't know what crown angle goes with what size pavillion or profess to be an expert on determining what a diamond looks like from paper. I will never get that.

 

I'm one of the top experts in the country at that and I still can't do it. :blink:

The documents are a good way to decide which ones to look at but they're a bad way to make a final decision.

 

Neil

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'Very Good' is a very broad category. Very good or better is a majority of stones in the marketplace.

 

'Excellent' means probably pretty nice.

'Very good' means maybe pretty nice ... maybe not.

'Good' means bad.

'Fair' means really bad.

'Poor' means defective.

 

Neil

 

I think this is a reasonable overview of GIA cut grades for rounds.

I'd add that every one I've seen which falls near the heart of the EX range has been very nice.

 

40.6/33.0 is pretty shallow but, as has already been said, it would need to be seen to assess how much it impacts performance.

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But I also promise I don't know what crown angle goes with what size pavillion or profess to be an expert on determining what a diamond looks like from paper. I will never get that.

 

I'm one of the top experts in the country at that and I still can't do it. ;)

The documents are a good way to decide which ones to look at but they're a bad way to make a final decision.

 

Neil

 

Now, I feel better. I guess I'm used to looking at the diamond first, then the paper that's attached later.

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