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gia vs egl


Guest raspino
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It’s not the paperwork that makes one diamond better than another. EGL documentation is popular at the shows and other discount type venues where people are trying to shop based on the specifications on dealer supplied ‘certificates’ for several reasons.

 

1) EGL services are a little bit less expensive than GIA and AGS.

2) EGL generally has a slightly faster turnaround for their customers.

3) The little square folded things that EGL calls a ‘consultation’ are convenient for the dealers who have a large number of stones in inventory.

4) EGL is can be more generous about grading. A stone that one lab calls I-1, another lab might call SI-3 (or SI-2). H might be called G (or even F). For customers buying on the specs, this can be a pretty important effect.

5) Some labs, and different kinds of reports offered by the same labs, include a lot more information than others, especially with regard to cutting. It’s no coincidence that you never see an AGS DQD with a cut grade less than 3 or a GIA DQR with a cut grade less than Good. It’s not that there are no such stones, it’s that the dealers who buy the lab services send these particular stones to labs that don’t include this information on their reports. Also, different labs use their terms differently. EGL has a wildly different definition of 'ideal' from what AGS uses.

 

The dealers, and their suppliers, are trying to sell each stone for as much as possible. That’s how them earn their living and the path from the mine to consumer is not the same for every stone. A stone does not end up at a discount booth at a show with an EGL advertisement by accident. This route was chosen, and it was chosen for a reason. Shop accordingly.

 

It’s also worth noting that there is more than one company doing business under the EGL brand name and their reports are superficially similar. Their services are not. If you are going to rely on the opinion of a lab, any lab, including GIA, AGS, EGL or me, start by convincing yourself that their opinion is reliable. If the lab can’t convince you that they are worth listening to, then the report isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on.

 

Neil

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