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mboogey

Difference between 1.25 and 1.5 carat diamond.

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I'll be purchasing an engagement ring in the near future. The setting will be white gold with baguette accents down each side. It's a very thick band. I'm aiming for 1.5 carats, but I don't want to sacrifice quality for size so I'm wondering what the visual difference is between a 1.25 carat center stone and a 1.5 carat. Is it significant? If I have to, I'll spring for the 1.5. I'm looking at either a princess or emerald cut. Do either one of those appear larger then the other? Also, my fiance has big fingers, size 9.5 so that's certainly a factor (lucky for me).

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I don't think the difference between a 1.25 and a 1.5 is really that big of a deal. Although your girlfriend's fingers are a bit bigger than some, even a 1 carat would probably look nice. I know a few women with ring sizes between 6.5 and 7.5, and they think that anything larger than a 1 carat looks bad in that it looks too big on them. 1.25 I think would be perfect, and if the 1.5 is going a bit over your budget, I'd just stick with the 1.25. You probably won't be able to tell the difference unless you hold them side by side (in most cases).

 

Take care,

 

Brian

 

brian@beforeproposing.com

www.beforeproposing.com

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Diamond size is a funny thing. When dealers talk about it, they are talking about weight - When people look at them, they're seeing diameter. Although these two are loosely related, they are definitely not the same thing. This would suggest that the most desirable stone is one with a big spread and the tradeoff here is optics. This is part of the reason that shopping for diamonds is a little more complicated than it appears at first blush. The best cut stones do not have the biggest face (or the smallest) and the tradeoffs on the road to 'best' aren't entirely obvious. Start by choosing a dealer, then choose the stone. Your dealer should be able to help you with this balancing act and, if they can’t, choose another dealer.

 

Zeroing in on a size is always a problem for shoppers. Every point increase in weight increases the price without an obviously increase in the apparent size but they do add up. It’s like asking which raindrop is the one that makes a storm. There’s no meaningful direct answer to your question and you will have to work it out for your own comfort level. It’s part of the balancing act.

 

Neil


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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I understand what you're saying. I'm the type of guy that does a ton of research before I drop big $$ and I've been educating myself on diamonds for about a month. The reason I'm zeroing in on a size is my fiance has very big fingers (size 9.5) and the desired setting band is VERY thick. I was at a local jewelry exchange and they placed a 1.09 carat emerald cut on top of the setting and it did look a little small. They then placed a 1.5 carat princess cut on the setting and it was spectacular.

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The size of the ring, meaning the amount of gold, melee and the like along with the ring design itself will have a considerably bigger effect on the ‘look’ with regard to the size of her hand than the size of the center diamond. If you’re worried about a ring that looks undersized for her hand, increase the general width of the piece and total metal content. If you’re concerned about the ring making the center diamond look comparatively small, increase the complexity of the design and the amount of surface area involved with the baguettes or other diamonds. 9 ½ is a bit bigger than average but it’s not way off in the extreme. Most jewelers will have addressed this issue many times.

 

Neil


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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