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Blue Nile vs. Union Diamond


petee25
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I am in the process of choosing between a princess cut diamond from Blue Nile or Union Diamond

 

I would like to know which would probably have better brilliance a "Signature Ideal" from Blue Nile or a "Select Ideal" from Union Diamond.

 

Union Diamond is a D color VS1 69/72 depth/table

 

Blue NIle is a G color VS1 68.5/71 both are trademark cuts

 

I would really appreciate any info.

 

Thanks

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As far as the cuts go, both are probably very similar. However, a D vs a G in color is a pretty big gap if they're the same price. Although G is still pretty good, I'd try something between D to F (although G is still very good).

 

As far as the two stores go, I'm partial to Blue Nile and prefer them a lot more for several reasons. They're not only one of the largest dealers, but they have some great deals and very trustworthy and well-respected.

 

Hope that helps. If you need more information, feel free to e-mail me.

 

Brian

 

brian@beforeproposing.com

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You might consider who can best answer any questions you have about the diamonds and whether or not either vendor can provide you images and additional information.

 

I am not sure about Union Diamonds, but I do know that Blue Nile does not ever see any of the diamonds they sell. They drop ship and therefore cannot authoritatively answer any questions about the stones. For this reason they may be slightly better priced than other vendors, but when spending thousands of dollars I think it is important to have as much information as possible to make an informed and confident decision.

 

Both companies are trustworthy and well-respected. They may however have different policies and offer things that one may hold more value over the other (i.e., accurate information and comparisons that you can only receive by them acting as "your eyes")

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Actually that's not entirely true. Blue Nile does have several diamonds that they themselves can look at. They do, however, have some diamonds off-site. When you select an off-site diamond, they call up the other jeweler at that location and have them give them more detailed stats on it. It's in their best interest not to disappoint their customers, as they'll lose money on their return policy. Several of the bigger diamond sites do a similar thing -- they don't always buy up every single diamond and have them on site. There's nothing wrong with this as long as they are honest and trustworthy.

 

Brian

 

brian@beforeproposing.com

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Blue Nile does have several diamonds that they themselves can look at.  They do, however, have some diamonds off-site.  When you select an off-site diamond, they call up the other jeweler at that location and have them give them more detailed stats on it.  There's nothing wrong with this as long as they are honest and trustworthy.

Of the tens of thousands of diamonds that Blue Nile lists, how many do you think they actually have in-house or access to examine themselves? I think "some" diamonds off site is an understatement, especially when they don't ever "see" those that are off site. Many or most would be better terms to use, I think.

 

Calling a wholesale supplier to ask them a question about the stone is not anywhere near equivalent to being able to authoritatively and accurately answer a question about a diamond you can see with your own eyes. And one does not have to buy every diamond they list to be able to have access to it to answer questions.

 

I never claimed Blue Nile was not trustworthy or that people shouldn't buy from them. My point is they cannot accurately answer questions, make comparisons between two stones, provide pictures, etc. When spending multiple thousands of dollars on a stone given and treasured with meaning and signficance those extra service features certainly hold some value.

 

One cannot say how good a diamond will appear in terms of brilliance based on the depth, table and symmetry only. Therefore, additional information and someone acting as your eyes and providing some guidance is key.

 

Let me ask this, do you think when someone requests for purchase a round brilliant diamond with a depth of 64 or 65% off of a blue nile list, becuase it is considerably cheaper, they explain the cons of such a depth and that based on the depth alone it is likely to be a less attractive and small diameter stone than many other choices in a similar price range? Or do they simply process the order and tell the supplier to ship?

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Megan,

 

I think in BN lingo, ‘signature ideal’ means, among other things, that they own the stone although this doesn’t mean that the people on the phone or email are prepared to answer much in the way of questions about it or that they are even able to look at it prior to sale. I haven't a clue how their physical inventory management works and I would fully expect this to be a closely held secret for obvious reasons. They do supply more data about each signature stone on their website than they do with their ‘regular’ faire.

 

Neil

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Actually they are quite knowledgeable. I've dealt with them several times myself, and I've never had a bad experience. The customer service reps know quite a bit and will often tell you themselves if they think a diamond is good or not (regardless or price). And although some diamonds are offsite, they are typically with other jewelers and not some wholesale place that knows nothing. They don't go straight from a single wholesale place -- they have a huge extended network of other jewelers. It's probably the only economically-smart way to have such a huge database of diamonds with still having knowledgeable sources around them. If these other jewelers sell their diamond before Blue Nile does, then it's simply taken off the list (that's why it changes so much, just like many diamonds at places -- they constantly move in and out).

 

You won't find any big-time place that doesn't do something like this, as it's just too expensive to buy up 60,000 diamonds. Even town jewelers often do the same -- they'll have a selection of stones in the store, but they also often have to order in new ones and some jewelers have networks as well where they don't even have to pay for the diamond until it's sold. It's a tricky, somewhat complex system. But the end result is, yes, who can tell you the most information and be accurate about it while still offering you a reasonable price.

 

I'm sure there are dozens of knowledgeable sites out there, though. You just have to be extra careful, unfortunately.

 

Take care,

 

Brian

 

brian@beforeproposing.com

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Customer Rep Diamond knowledge on these Virtual diamonds (VD) is superficial at best and compromised by the fact that the diamond is not in front of them. Two diamonds with the same exact numbers can differ in their face-up appearance. This is especially true with fancy shapes.

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Barry, that was a nice summarization of the point I was trying to make. Thanks!

 

Brian, please understand I wasn't trying to question the trustworthiness or reputation of any company. I was just trying to point out the disadvantages of working with large companies whose customer service representatives don't see the diamonds first hand.

 

And, welcome to the forum! :)

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I'd agree with that comment about "fancy" shapes. Round diamonds are definitely the easiest ones to deal with and know their "quality," so to speak. Other shapes can be a lot harder to figure out (and there's a lot of debate on that too!). And seeing the diamond firsthand is always a big plus (but try looking at it in natural light too), or at least knowing that the person you're talking to knows a good diamond when he/she sees one.

 

Brian

 

brian@beforeproposing.com

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