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canary diamonds


mkeep74
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Hi mkeep,

The term "Canary" can be a bit misleading.

GIA uses a grading scale to describe color.

If the word "Canary" is used to desribe a diamond GIA graded Fancy Vivid Yellow - then it is likely worth considerably more than a colorless diamond of similar size and clarity.

Here's a Fancy Vivid Yellow set into a ring

21185a.JPG

 

As a diamond get's lighter yellow, the price goes down.

Light Yellow diamonds such as Fancy Light Yellow are priced well below high white diamonds, such as G color or higher.

 

Here's a Fancy Light Yellow

32792aa.JPG

 

Many people will look at a nice Fancy light Yellow and call it a "Canary"

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...., but from everything I've read diamonds with color are considered to be less valuable

I just wanted to add that certain colors are very rare and make a diamond considerably more valuable than colorless diamonds.

 

Green diamonds for example are one of the highest valued colors. Blue and pink diamonds are also rare and cost considerably more than colorless diamonds.

 

As diamondsbylauren also mentioned, the intensity of color also greatly factors into the pricing.

 

I once saw an exhibit of fancy color diamonds at The Natural History Museum. The range of possible colors in diamonds is amazing.

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A letter we got:

Thankyou for the information you posted. It was very helpful. I've been looking at various sites for some time now trying to learn more about different gems and their worth, but the yellow diamond subject had me confused.

If you have the time I hope you will answer one other question. I've lookes at auction sites such as ebay, bidz and yahoo along with others and see gems being sold for considerably less, but also they have a compare value that is considerably high. From all the things I've read, I look at the characteristics listed and think that their compare value is often higher than what I think they would normally sell for. I've considered buying off of one of these sites, because I just want a personal collection of jewelry, but I don't want to get items that are not of any real value. Alot of these items do have certificates that come with them such as GIA or other cerifications, but it makes me nervous. Do you know if these sites are guaranteed and regulated to make sure people aren't getting bamboozled into thinking the items are worth more than they actually are? Can I buy with relative confidence thinking I'm getting a huge deal or do I just need to bite the bullet, save my money and buy from a store or dealer?

I love a good bargain but will choose quality over that anyday.

Any advice you could give me on this would be extremely helpful.

 

 

I'm going to answer here so others can read it too.

I've lookes at auction sites such as ebay, bidz and yahoo along with others and see gems being sold for considerably less, but also they have a compare value that is considerably high.

You already guessed that any seller assigning thier own "Compare"value- or "appraisal" value- ANY number other than what they are selling it for- is simply using a sales technique.

Sales techniques are fine- for example, maybe a store is has a "normal price" of $10,000 for a ring which they might actually sell for $9000. Informing the customer of this is a valid selling technique.

But a seller trying to convince someone the $3000 diamond they're selling is actually worth $6000? I'd say that's pretty deceptive.

The same goes for ANY "certificate" or lab report which assigns value- it's totally meaningless.

 

SO- let's say that as a rule the higher the "compare value" the greater the bullspit.

 

Alot of these items do have certificates that come with them such as GIA or other cerifications, but it makes me nervous. Do you know if these sites are guaranteed and regulated to make sure people aren't getting bamboozled into thinking the items are worth more than they actually are?

 

eBay, and sites like it do NOT guarantee the purchases- buyers must exercise extreme caution when shopping high value items online. Just make sure the seller is reputable.

There's a TON of scams.

You grouped GIA with other "certificates"- do not make the mistake of thinking ANY substitute can compare to GIA.

 

GIA is the only lab to consider- especially if we're talking fancy color diamonds.

 

 

If you do your research, it is possible to save by buying from the better internet sellers.

AS far as "deal of the century" sellers:

Any time someone offers me a dollar bill for .50 cents, I have to wonder if it's counterfeit

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David,

 

‘Comparable value’ indeed. In Colorado it’s actually illegal or dealers to do this but apparently other places have different rules.

 

I agree with your position on alternative labs with the exception of AGS, which is a lab that grades ‘colorless’ diamonds only. You apparently consider them unreliable. This has not been my observation. Have you had bad experiences with them?

 

Neil

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Great point Neil!

AGS is very highly regarded.

Acceptable on par with GIA- although it is rare to see an AGS report used for purposes other than "Ideal Triple Zero" Status.

 

The same top level traders that wold scorn other non GIA reports for a high dollar diamond might very well pay HUGE dollars for a 2 carat D/IF with a real triple Zero on the AGS grading scale!

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