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Diamond Cut


haa1025
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Recently I was talking to a friend of mine who had just finished buying an engagement ring. He bought a radiant cut diamond, and since I was in market to buy one soon as well I had told him that my girlfriend liked the princess cut, but now she was leaning more torwards a round stone, since she likes the way it sparkles more than a princess cut.

This is where my dilemma arises: My friend told me that I should avoid buying the round stone, since it is a trendier cut, and is now becoming a faux pas. He said a friend of his fiance was the joke of the group because her fiance had given her a round stone. He said avoid it unless she really has heart set on it, and instead go for the princess cut.

 

I thought round was the most traditional cut. I also thought that the only cuts to avoid were pear or heart shaped diamonds. I am very confused and would like to know if there are any cuts to avoid buying, since I intend to propose soon, and would like her diamond to be forever! Thank you.

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Your posting makes me sad. How unfortunate that people who probably know next to nothing about diamonds (not that I know that much either) would think it appropriate to make fun of your friend with the round. Ultimately I think they are going to be the joke because an excellently cut round is timelessly spectacular and will be so long after any other cut that is supposedly the "it" cut has ceased to be so. My advice to you is to buy quality not quantity, and buy a round. I recently purchase the following:

 

D colorless

Internally Flawless

GIA Excellent Cut, Excellent Polish, Excellent Symmetry,

Medium Blue Fluorecence

.81 Carat

Lazare Kaplan Ideal Round Brilliant

 

This "small" stone over the last month has made many a larger stone look like dirty ice to the consternation of snobs. You do not need to go D and IF, but you do need to go with a very high quality cut if you want a spectacular stone. Search this wonderful forum and you will find many references to stones available with high quality cut. Good luck!

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I’m with Steve, - I’m appalled.

 

Selection of a diamond is a personal expression of love between you and your fiancée. Your ‘friends’ have nothing to do with it. The Round brilliant has been very popular since it was developed in 1919, which strikes me as quite a while, but I suppose that could be called a trend if you want. Making some woman a ‘joke of the group’ because they disapprove of the shape of the diamond chosen by her beloved is behavior straight out of junior high school. Get whatever shape you and your beloved like and if you’re friends think less of you for it, get new friends.

 

Neil Beaty

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Thanks to all who posted, especially Steve and Neil. I was going to go with the round stone regardless, I just thought that my friend's comment was interesting, and perhaps something I should look into, since after all I do want my future fiance to be happy with her ring (she has been dreaming of it since birth!).

 

I am definitely going with the round stone, especially after all of your words of encouragment!

 

 

Side note: Neil, I noticed you had provided a date as to when the round stone was created, just curious, where did you get this information? And would you be able to tell me when the radiant cut and the princess cut were created?

 

Thank you all again for the responses!

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Side note:  Neil, I noticed you had provided a date as to when the round stone was created, just curious, where did you get this information?  And would you be able to tell me when the radiant cut and the princess cut were created?

 

Thank you all again for the responses!

There was a book written by Marcel Tolkowski called 'Diamond Design' published in 1919 wherin he describes what he counsidered to be the perfect cut. To this day the Tolkowski name is synonymous with skillful cutting. The cut he described is what is known now as the round brilliant. He didn't claim to invent the facet pattern so it's not really accurate to say that it was developed with his book but he certainly started the 'trend' of popularity for it.

 

Neil

 

ps. the publication of Diamond Design was a pivitol event for the diamond cutting industry. If you're up for a litle light reading, the entire text of it is available here:

http://www.folds.net/diamond_design/index.html

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