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Price too good to be true????


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Well I've been searching for a diamond for the past month and found an online retailer that is selling a greating sounding diamond with the following attributes:

 

Price: $4,774.00

Report: EGL

Shape: Round

Carat: 1.30

Color: E

Clarity: SI1

Depth: 60

Table: 57

Girdle: M-

Polish: Excellent

Symmetry: Excellent

Culet: None

Fluorescence: None

Measurements: 7.08-7.12X4.27

 

I've checked diamonds with close to the exact same metrics (even the same report/certification) at sites like BlueNile, Union Diamond, etc, and they are at least $1000 more. Heck BlueNile was almost $1500 more! This company has been in business a long time and has received good reviews from purchasers according to other diamond forums.

 

I am asking whether (based upon the metrics) this sounds like a great deal. I'd really appreciate some feedback seeing as tho my research regarding diamonds has only been for the past week and Im hoping some of you are more of the "advanced to expert" level in knowledge :P

 

Thank for any info everyone!

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This is obviously a "Virtual Diamond" (VD), meaning that it comes from a manufacturer who supplies his database to a multitude of on-line vendors. These vendors never see the diamond and have it drop-shipped to you directly from the manufacturer.

 

This particular on-line Vendor has no investment in this diamond; listing it on his website costs nothing, and is content with making a very minimal profit.

 

For starters: EGL color-clarity grading is not as accurate, stringent, or consistent as either GIA or AGS labs, the benchmarks of the industry The color-clarity grading on this diamond may well be 1-2 grades off. So essentially you will be paying "more" for "less".

 

Next, in just about all cases, a round brilliant diamond that has a Table percentage greater than it's total depth percentage will leak out considerable amounts of light and appear opaque and glassy in the face-up position. For starters to refract proper light up through the Table and Crown to your eye, this Table-Depth relationship should be reversed so that white light, colored light, and scintillation is maximized and the diamond is truly "seen" and appreciated for it's beauty.

 

You can do a whole lot better. Of course price is an important factor, but remember if the price is too good to be true, there is a good reason.

 

Work with an Internet Vendor that knows diamonds and can call in the diamond from the manufacturer for personal examination/evaluation. Get as much information before you put your money down.

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First, I'll give my little disclaimer that I know nothing about round diamonds.

 

Second, I'll say that from all the research I've done and the people whose opinions I've heard, EGL certed diamonds don't see for as much as GIA certed. They 'tend' to be more lenient in their grading, and your E/SI1 could end up being a G/I1 or something like that.

 

if I were you, I would look for a GIA or AGS (I think that's right) certed stone. You may end up paying more, but in the end you'll be better off.

 

Just my 2 cents.

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A 20% variation between online dealers on the exact same stone is pretty unusual. The profit margins on these things just isn't that high. There may be a data entry error at one or both dealers. BlueNile is rarely the least expensive but people like them for other reasons.

 

By the way, many of the online dealers will match each others pricing on virtual diamonds if you ask and if it's not simply a typing error. Choosing the dealer is a surprisingly important step in making diamond shopping a pleasant experience. Look for a dealer that tends to think the same way that you do and you can reduce the number of times you order in a stone, get it appraised, return it, order a new one, get it appraised etc. I sort of like this process, but then I'm an appraiser, I get paid for it. Most customers find it annoying. It is possible to save some money by this process and often it works out just as you would hope but there are some potential traps along the way.

 

Neil

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Next, in just about all cases, a round brilliant diamond that has a Table percentage greater than it's total depth percentage will leak out considerable amounts of light and appear opaque and glassy in the face-up position. For starters to refract proper light up through the Table and Crown to your eye, this Table-Depth relationship should be reversed so that white light, colored light, and scintillation is maximized and the diamond is truly "seen" and appreciated for it's beauty.

I don't know enough to disagree with you on the physics, but didn't the OP state that the table is 57 and the depth is 60? In that case, the table is LESS than the total depth.

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You're right. Mis-read on my part. Take my above as a tutorial when the numbers are reversed.

 

The rest on VD diamonds still holds, IMO.

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