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Avoid Shenoa & Co. (a.k.a. Global Bargain Hunters)


topforextrader
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Dear readers, I wanted to post my own horrible experience with the internet seller Shenoa & Co. so you can all learn from my mistake. First, I actually bought my ring from a company listed as Global Bargain Hunters on Ebay, but this company turned out to be simply another alias for Shenoa & Co. So be forewarned that if you are looking to buy a diamond ring off of Ebay make sure it is not from Shenoa & Co. or Global Bargain Hunters. They may very well have other aliases they are using as well.

 

Here is the short & skinny of what happened...I purchased what was supposed to be a .78 carat solitaire ring, round brilliant cut, VS1 clarity, and G color. I am certainly no expert on diamonds, but even I could tell as soon as I opened my UPS package that I had been seriously misled. I then took the ring to a local jeweler to get an appraisal. Well the ring was appraised as a .47 carat, SI3, J-K color. Obviously I was furious and immediately returned the ring.

 

After returning the ring, the customer service agent actually had the nerve to tell me he had put the ring on the diamond scale himself and that the diamond was actually a .79 carat, as they don't mind giving away an extra point or two. I cannot even fathom what kind of company and what kind of person it takes to lie outright to my face and treat me as if I am the world's biggest fool. I personally held the ring I received up to a .75 diamond ring and the difference was obvious. The customer service agent then went on to tell me that the local jeweler was deceiving me for his own purposes. This is the line you will see as response to any negative feedback they receive on Ebay! According to Shenoa all local jewelers are out to screw the consumer by issuing faulty appraisals! These scammers will do anything to avoid negative feedback on Ebay!

 

Anyhow, it took three phone calls, five emails, and numerous threats to receive my refund, but I finally did get my money back. Oh yeah, they did leave an extra $20 on my card though probably just as one last little attempt to win the "Worst Online Seller in the History of the Internet" award. I wrote them a scathing email telling them all the ways I was going to spread the word of avoiding their company so they did also refund that $20. All said and done I lost a total of $145 on this fiasco due to a bogus certificate they won't refund money on, return shipping, and the real appraisal.

 

Learn from my mistake and others to avoid this company. That is Shenoa & Co. and Global Bargain Hunters! If you are insane enough to purchase a diamond online, call the company first if there is a phone number and make absolute sure that you are not buying from Shenoa & Co. hiding under yet another alias.

 

Help me spread the word about this terrible company. When a deal seems to good to be true it is. No exceptions.

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  • 2 weeks later...

topforextrader,

 

At the risk of defending Shenoa when you’re the injured party here, you are partially to blame. They are pretty clear in their advertising about what they are offering, what their grading standards are and what their return policies are. You chose them because you liked the price point and you were willing to trade lower prices for lower grading standards and more restrictive terms. They said what they were going to do and they did what they said. I’m sorry for your unhappy experience and I truly am and I’m glad for you that they made it right. I’m writing this for the benefit of future shoppers and because a lot of your complaints would unreasonably tarnish good merchants that, in some ways, have the same policies that you're complaining about.

 

Addressing some of your specific concerns:

 

They are doing business under a trade name.

This is not uncommon and it’s not unethical. Zales does this. General Motors does this. Wal-Mart does this. Kroger does this. Dealers do this because different customers respond to different types of advertising. I agree that it’s annoying but it’s not a conspriacy.

 

They made it a hassle to make a return.

Again, it’s annoying but not surprising and it’s not a violation of their stated policies. They said that they would refund your money if you weren’t happy but they never said that they wouldn’t try to talk you out of it.

 

They blamed it on the jeweler/appraiser.

Saying that opinions of appraisers can vary by 25% is being generous. It’s far more than that. They say that their stones are graded by an anonymous employee who is ‘GIA trained’, which I’m sure is true. So what? GIA is a college, they train tons of people. Some are highly skilled, some have hidden agendas, some are idiots. They’re right to question the agenda and skills of your grader/appraiser and your right to have done the same with theirs.

 

The ‘certificate’.

You bought an add-on item of a document issued by a completely unknown and unresearchable 3rd party giving their opinion of some of the properties of the stone. Why? Anyone who wants to can call him or herself a lab and say pretty much anything they want about a stone. This doesn’t make them reliable. They can use any grading scale they choose and they can apply that scale any way they wish. The key is that you don’t have to care. The certificate was a bad purchase and the fact that it was offered in the first place is a bad sign for your other purchase. In any case, the certificate is clearly labeled as non-refundable. The fact that it’s worse than useless doesn’t change this.

 

The grading.

This is the root of the problem. Their guy called it a 0.79ct. VS-1 G and you’re guy called it a 0.47ct. SI-3 K. How could it be so different? Different graders see things differently, measure things differently and even make errors differently. I know nothing about either the merchandise or the skills, techniques, equipment or agenda of either grader so it’s impossible to make a determination of who is ‘right’ but you seem anxious to rely on one or the other to make an expensive decision. Why? Appraise the appraisers, both of them. If the grading information is going to be an important element in your shopping decision, and it usually is, make sure it comes from a source that you have reason to trust. Then trust them. The 3rd partiy verification is to justfy or contradict your trust in the vendor, not as a substitute for it.

 

Buying online.

It wasn’t their decision to market online that caused you trouble any more than it was the fact that they have a retail store in a prominent location in NYC. It’s not the dealers’ choice of location or their medium for advertising that makes them good or bad, it’s the character of the people behind the counter/keyboard.

 

Worst Online Seller in the History of the Internet.

This is a hotly contested title indeed. These guys aren’t even close. They stated and honored their return policy. They delivered actual merchandise. They charged you exactly once, for the agreed upon amount. They didn’t sell your name or your credit card number to the Nigerian mafia. Don’t kid yourself. There are some real criminals out there that can take you for a ride in a big way. You didn’t get what you wanted and you spent a few bucks on shipping and expert services to figure it out. This could have gone much much worse.

 

Where did you go wrong?

#1 Don’t base a buying decision on an opinion of an unknown lab, grader or appraiser, much less pay extra for it.

#2 Read the return policy and other terms of sale FIRST. If you don’t like them, don’t bother even reading the rest advertisement.

#3 Comply with the terms. If you’re going to get it appraised (which I recommend), and you’re going to base your shopping decision based on the results of the appraisal (which I recommend), make sure that the chosen appraiser will fit any clauses in the terms and conditions and make sure you meet the deadlines. Then choose an appraiser that you have some reason to trust beyond the fact that the seller told you that they were ok. You didn’t actually mess this up but it’s an area where lots of people do so it seemed appropriate to mention it here for the benefit of other readers.

#4 View all documents provided by the seller skeptically, especially things that contain elements that you know are untrue (like an appraisal that lists a ‘value’ that’s double or triple the asking price). Even be careful about documents that you would otherwise count as valuable, like a GIA grading report or an appraisal from a known and trusted appraiser, because these don’t always tell the whole story and they aren’t always as they appear at first.

#5 All dealers say they are giving you a good deal, not all of them are doing it and the worst ones tend to be the ones that yell the loudest about how good they are. This may seem obvious but it’s what got you into the this in the first place. Shenoa promised the moon and the jeweler didn’t. This is not particularly unusual but, if you value and are wanting to use the jeweler’s expertise to help you shop, consider shopping in their store. When you really end up comparing the same things, they often can compete nicely and they can offer a shopping experience that a lot of folks prefer. If you find a difference in the offering, make sure you understand what the difference is. It may not just be the price.

 

Neil

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  • 1 year later...
Help me spread the word about this terrible company.

I can't help but notice that you apparently gave them a positive, or at least a neutral review in the ebay feedback system. May I ask why?

 

Neil

 

Yes Mr.Neil.....you may ask why ...and here is the answer :

http://209.85.135.104/search?q=cache:gw4es...t=clnk&cd=4

Check the link....they work with eBay ....It doesn't matter if you give them a negative feedback because eBay change it in a pozitiv feedback.I've had a similar problem .I tough that I buy a nice diamond of $ 30.000 but I've got a fake one .ebay did nothing .If you want to buy a nice diamond try to avoid ebay user : global_bargain_hunters (Shenoa & Co. a.k.a. Global Bargain Hunters) or use only a safe method of payment that allow you to inspect the merchandise before.

THEY WILL TELL YOU SOMETHING ABOUT THE REFUND POLICY

RETURN POLICY:

SATISFACTION:

The item can be returned for a full refund or exchange within 7 days after receiving it. Any jewelry that has been sized, set, unset or modified by the customers once they have received it is non returnable. All items must be returned in original condition. We also offer a lifetime upgrade. The refund will be in the same form as the purchase was made.Your satisfaction is our priority. Please be aware that opinions of appraisers may vary up to 25%. Diamond grading is subjective and may vary greatly. If you are not satisfied with your purchase, please let us know. We will do what ever we can to make it right for you. Our business hours are:

Sales:

Monday - Friday from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm EST, Saturday from 10:00 am to 9:00 pm EST, Sunday from 12:00 am to 9:00 pm EST.

Customer Service:

Monday - Friday from 9:00 am to 6:00pm EST

Showroom:

Monday - Friday from 9:00 am to 6:00pm EST, Saturday from 10:30 am to 5:30pm, Sunday - 12:00 am to 6:00 pm.

If you have any questions, please call toll free 1-866-322-9496 or 212-575-0786.

 

NEVER TRUST Global Bargain Hunters OR THE REFUND POLICY FROM Global Bargain Hunters ebay user global_bargain_hunters( 1308) I've trusted global_bargain_huntersand and I've been burned

YOU WILL WASTE YOUR TIME AND YOUR MONEY !

Ebay recommend

Safe Payment Methodss.gifDo not:

Do not use Western Union or MoneyGram or other Instant Cash Transfer method to purchase a vehicle.

 

s.gifDo:imgCheck_12x12.gif Perform cash transactions in person only.imgCheck_12x12.gif Use caution when using a wire transfer. imgCheck_12x12.gif Contact the seller if you are considering sending your payment through an accredited escrow service.s.gifRefer to the item page to obtain specific payment instructions from the seller. Contact the seller to ensure that you are comfortable with the proposed payment method.s.gif

eBay do not offer Buer protection if you pay by wire transfer .Paypal covers only $ 200 when you buy a dimond.....so be aware!!! use only a safe method of payment that allow you to inspect the merchandise before !

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  • 1 year later...

Hi everyone! I just wanted to share with you the recent expierence that I had with Shenoa Jewelry Co.

I found this ring on ebay that I really liked, but was a little nervous about buying a diamond sight unseen.

I have been looking in many jewelry stores and it seems like the sales people's ideas of what is pretty, and mine are very different.

Also, I know diamonds, and sometime they will bring out a soap dish and swear it has good color and clarity.

I know what I am looking for - GIA (quality) 2 ct. , H color, vs2 clarity. (I had one from a former fiance and gave it back).

I also - have a beer budget , so I was looking into enhanced diamonds when I came across this diamond solitaire from Shenoa - on ebay.

I contacted the seller and asked (in an email ) if this stone had carbon, was clowdy or heavily included - or was it as beautiful as it sounded. The response was a "call me" email.

I called a man named Rudi and we had a wonderful conversation and I told him exactly what I was looking for and asked if this was the diamond for me.

He said he had a 2.22 ct, h color and vs2 clarity that he would sell me at the same price. I thought "hot dog", and gave him my credit card.

 

My husband got home later and was FURIOUS!!! He couldn't understand how I could be so naive. He explained that no one would sell me almost a quarter more diamond for the same price - if it was so great...

 

THE NEXT DAY (after my payment was complete) I recieved the stone.

It is the diamond I have awlays dreamed of!!!!!!!!!!!! I had it set in my wedding ring (used to hold a 2 ct moissanite)

and it looks flawless!!!!

It is almost too big for the mount but my jeweler made it fit!

It is crystal clear, sparkley, white and completely clean to the naked eye!!! I took it to 2 different jewelers and they were SHOCKED at the deal I got on this beautiful stone!

Rudi picked it perfectly - and Michael in customer service is also informative and helpful!

I will buy again from this company and will recommend them to my friends.

Edited by jeweli
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Neil, you seem to be missing the root of the problem when you say "the root of the problem". Yes, diamond gradings in terms of colour and clarity etc are subjective and down to individuals opinions. HOWEVER, the carat weight of a diamond is NOT. If it weights 0.50ct, then it weighs 0.50ct. Simple as that. Therefore, if the customer received a diamond which was 0.47ct and not the 0.79ct he was sold then, quite simply, he was mis-sold. End of story.

 

Simon Wiser

Managing Director

www.dejoria.co.uk

Edited by SPW
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The grading.

This is the root of the problem. Their guy called it a 0.79ct. VS-1 G and you�re guy called it a 0.47ct. SI-3 K. How could it be so different? Different graders see things differently, measure things differently and even make errors differently. I know nothing about either the merchandise or the skills, techniques, equipment or agenda of either grader so it�s impossible to make a determination of who is �right� but you seem anxious to rely on one or the other to make an expensive decision. Why? Appraise the appraisers, both of them. If the grading information is going to be an important element in your shopping decision, and it usually is, make sure it comes from a source that you have reason to trust. Then trust them. The 3rd party verification is to justify or contradict your trust in the vendor, not as a substitute for it.

 

Neil

 

Neil, you seem to be missing the root of the problem when you say "the root of the problem". Yes, diamond gradings in terms of colour and clarity etc are subjective and down to individuals opinions. HOWEVER, the carat weight of a diamond is NOT. If it weights 0.50ct, then it weighs 0.50ct. Simple as that. Therefore, if the customer received a diamond which was 0.47ct and not the 0.79ct he was sold then, quite simply, he was mis-sold. End of story.

 

Simon Wiser

Managing Director

www.dejoria.co.uk

 

Simon,

 

Welcome to the forum,

 

Although it's true that there is a correct answer to the weight question and it could have been answered by the simple test of dropping it unmounted on a scale, there is no evidence that this occurred. In fact it nearly certainly didn't since removing it from the mounting would have voided the return privilege. We have one approximate weight compared against another. I stand by my position that we know nothing about EITHER grader or how they made their determination and do not have a basis to say that the 0.47 is correct and the 0.79 is wrong. The solution is to assess the merits of the two 'appraisers' involved and to decide which (if either) is credible. Since this is a year and a half old discussion that jeweli decided to post an endorsement onto, I think it's unlikely we'll see any more info about the situation. I've crossed swords with Shenoa on more than one occasion and I find their attitude annoying but it is not reasonable that they should be held to a higher standard than everyone else just because their 'customer service' guy is a bit of a snit. They stated their policies upfront and they honored them. They DID issue the refund. Avoid them if you want and a pattern of unhappy customers is certainly cause for some alarm but topforextrader's complaint is mostly unsupported and parts are even frivolous.

 

Neil

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Just curious Neil- a few hypothetical questions that relate to this subject:

If a company selling diamonds sold "certificates" or "Appraisals" and led the consumer to believe they were from an independent source when in fact the seller themselves issued the paper, is that not deceptive?

If a consumer fell for this, how are they at fault?

Shouldn't the seller be held up to a higher standard?

Instead of blaming the consumer, shouldn't we, as professionals with ethics , warn unknowing buyers to avoid seller issued "certificates"...or ANY gradings based on non GIA or AGSL reports?

 

Again, a hypothetical question: If GM decides to market Saturn to attract a different audience, what in the world would that have in common with a hypothetical seller who created different names due to a huge amount of complaints- or even possibly litigation?

Again, I'm not speaking to the specific people or sellers mentioned in this thread, but rather in general.

I believe that in the case of internet and eBay sellers, changing names to hide prior problems is more common.

DirtCheap Diamonds became James Allen- that's a case where it's clear why the seller changed the name- and JA never tried to "bury" his prior name.

In stark contrast to this, I have seen cases where internet sellers purposefully changed names to hide problems.

 

Another hypothetical- If a seller gives consumers a very hard time when it comes to a return/refund, isn't that important to know?

Is it OK for a company to use pressure tactics to try and force buyers to keep an item they don't like?

I've even heard of cases of sellers on eBay withholding refunds until a buyer leaves a positive feedback.Isn't that a form of extortion?

Furthermore, would you recommend people buy from a seller who's shown this proclivity?

 

While it's true that one would need to put a diamond on a scale loose to obtain its exact weight, what's the likelihood of an appraiser that knows anything about diamonds not being able to tell a 1/2 carat ( .47ct) diamond from a 3/4ct (.79ct)?

If someone asked you to estimate the weight of a mounted diamond, is it that difficult?

Of course not, you'd measure the stone to the best of your ability, and use a chart ( or your memory) to ascertain the weight.

This type of estimation is not all that difficult.

You have stated that we know nothing about either person or entity that called the stone any particular weight, but you've also mentioned you've "crossed swords" with the seller who's the subject of this thread. Hasn't this type of conversation occurred here- and on other diamond forums- regarding the same seller?

 

I have tremendous respect for Neil- but I just can't see how he would defend these type of practices......

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If a company selling diamonds sold "certificates" or "Appraisals" and led the consumer to believe they were from an independent source when in fact the seller themselves issued the paper, is that not deceptive?

 

Yes.

 

If a consumer fell for this, how are they at fault?

 

A customer has a responsibility to do a certain amount of due diligence in their own shopping. Imagine if a dealer says that ‘some guy I met said it was a 3 carat VVS. I forgot his name and you can’t talk to him yourself but he sounded really convincing’. A customer who relies on this information is being a fool and they are contributing to their own problems.

 

Shouldn't the seller be held up to a higher standard?

 

Yes.

 

Instead of blaming the consumer, shouldn't we, as professionals with ethics , warn unknowing buyers to avoid seller issued "certificates"...or ANY gradings based on non GIA or AGSL reports?

 

Never did I recommend Shenoa in any way and I specifically recommended against the usefulness and value of their ‘certificates’. I routinely give exactly the advice you suggest although it’s not included in EVERY post.

 

Again, a hypothetical question: If GM decides to market Saturn to attract a different audience, what in the world would that have in common with a hypothetical seller who created different names due to a huge amount of complaints- or even possibly litigation?

Again, I'm not speaking to the specific people or sellers mentioned in this thread, but rather in general.

I believe that in the case of internet and eBay sellers, changing names to hide prior problems is more common.

DirtCheap Diamonds became James Allen- that's a case where it's clear why the seller changed the name- and JA never tried to "bury" his prior name.

In stark contrast to this, I have seen cases where internet sellers purposefully changed names to hide problems.

 

The relationship between Shenoa and Global Bargain Hunters is not a secret. To the extent that they or someone else may be using tradenames as a way of disguising or deflecting a history of problems it’s entirely appropriate to point out these connections.

 

Another hypothetical- If a seller gives consumers a very hard time when it comes to a return/refund, isn't that important to know? Is it OK for a company to use pressure tactics to try and force buyers to keep an item they don't like?

 

It depends on what constitutes pressure. Not everyone sees this the same. I think it’s reasonable and expected for a dealer to make an attempt to salvage a sale when someone asks for a refund. What some call pressure, others call salesmanship. It’s certainly a reason to avoid sellers with tactics you find offensive but it doesn’t make the seller a fraud. It’s even a reason to move away from an exchange or other non-cash solution. How they behave during a return is a wonderful way of getting a feel for whether you want to attempt further business with a company.

 

I've even heard of cases of sellers on eBay withholding refunds until a buyer leaves a positive feedback.Isn't that a form of extortion?

 

Yes.

 

Furthermore, would you recommend people buy from a seller who's shown this proclivity?

 

No.

 

While it's true that one would need to put a diamond on a scale loose to obtain its exact weight, what's the likelihood of an appraiser that knows anything about diamonds not being able to tell a 1/2 carat ( .47ct) diamond from a 3/4ct (.79ct)?

 

We don’t know if this appraiser knows anything about diamonds. We know next to nothing at all about him/her. It might simply be a typographical error where they transposed the two digits. It might be a measurement or math error. It might be an idiot. Yes, it might be a fraudulent sale. It is not valid to say that because they disagree, therefore the appraiser is right. There is not sufficient information to make this call.

 

If someone asked you to estimate the weight of a mounted diamond, is it that difficult?

 

No

 

Of course not, you'd measure the stone to the best of your ability, and use a chart ( or your memory) to ascertain the weight.

This type of estimation is not all that difficult.

You have stated that we know nothing about either person or entity that called the stone any particular weight, but you've also mentioned you've "crossed swords" with the seller who's the subject of this thread. Hasn't this type of conversation occurred here- and on other diamond forums- regarding the same seller?

 

More than once I have had clients who purchased things from this seller who have decided to return based on my opinions. This has resulted in strong attacks against me, my credibility, my methodology, my reporting, my character, my independence and even my city in an effort to convince the client that they should keep the merchandise.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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A customer has a responsibility to do a certain amount of due diligence in their own shopping. Imagine if a dealer says that ‘some guy I met said it was a 3 carat VVS. I forgot his name and you can’t talk to him yourself but he sounded really convincing’. A customer who relies on this information is being a fool and they are contributing to their own problems

 

Sure, it would be great if people understood enough to ask the right questions- but my feeling is that even some very intelligent folks might not. To say nothing of people that might be more gullible.

Sure, if someone comes here asking, it's likely they have already followed common sense to put in due diligence.

I suppose since I am a seller, I feel that other sellers should go that extra mile- and not attempt to confuse the issue of gem labs, or misuse the name of GIA . After all, they will catch some people.

I know you agree.

Given that you've already had personal experience, I applaud your neutral stance Neil.

 

Just a few hours ago a very articulate follow called and asked if I'd heard of GAA.

 

Sure, I drive there every day in my Farrari ( it looks just like a Ferrari but it's actually a Fiero)

 

I am actually grateful, because bad sellers drive intelligent shoppers to more transparent, honest sellers.

in some ways the internet really is a good way to flush this out.

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Of course I agree, and in no way am I suggesting that the sharks should get a free pass for ripping off fools. Companies as laudable as Tiffany&Co will issue ‘certificates’ authored by their own employees and it adds a great deal of confusion in the marketplace when people are deciding who to believe. That’s why I’m so insistent that it’s necessary to decide in whom you are placing your trust and to consider the merits of THAT decision first, before you assign any credibility at all to the opinion itself. It's up to them to convince the customer that their opinions have merit and the default answer is NO. All opinions are not of equal merit despite the Googlesque logic that says they are. Some are useful and some are worth nothing at all. Some tell you more about the person trying to get you to believe it than they tell you about the merchandise. This rule applies across the board and includes both dealers and appraisers as well as the labs. Needless to say it also includes advice found on Internet blogs. Sensible shopping habits reduce the occurrence of problems by a LOT and this is something that only the consumer can implement.

 

Neil

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We agree- shoppers are far better served using their intuition and efforts to select the best dealer.

But I still don't feel that comparing a company pushing GAA ( or NGL) reports should be compared to Tiffany's.

Do you feel Tiffany has policies designed to purposefully confuse shoppers?

 

Based on a lot of what we've heard, on this and other forums- and even your own experience- I believe the title of this thread is not frivolous in any way.

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It wasn’t the title I called frivolous. It was some of the specific charges associated with this specific incident. Charges like the fact that they use a tradename as evidence that they’re scumbags. David, YOU use a tradename. Jared is a tradename. They are common in business and there is simply nothing wrong with this practice. This claim is frivolous.

 

You made the position that dealer supplied grading information is, by definition, not reliable and I pointed out an example where I believe it is. That’s not the same as calling all graders equal. The difference is in the credibility of the grader. I think Tiffany’s has demonstrated that they are a responsible source of information while some of these others have not. It's not the fact that they call themselves a lab that makes their opinions valuable and they make no claim at all of 'independence'. It’s the fact that they’re Tiffany’s that makes the difference.

 

Neil

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How about Diamonds by Nicole? That was another name used. That one obviously got me a little upset.

 

If a seller has problems with eBay, and that's the reason for a name change, that would seem to indicate an attempt to hide complaints.

 

At no time did I ever say all seller provided grading is useless or deceptive- in fact, we sell quite a few diamonds with no GIA reports and I am very proud of our record on grading.

 

I apologize if I misunderstood- as it seemed to me as though you were defending the seller in question- and that was my objection.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Why do I not believe you??

 

 

I don't know. Maybe you have some sort of problem.

 

I am very excited - I finally took ring in for an appraisal and I am Thrilled!!!

I feel like I got a really great deal -

I will purchase from Shenoa again!

Edited by jeweli
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Interesting- where did you take it for an appraisal?

What was the grade promised, and what did the appraiser say?

 

 

I took it to Goldsmith Jewelers in Orlando, FL.

The GIA appraiser I did not speak with (the cert will be mailed to me).

I did speak with the owner, and he said it was beautiful (of course).

He appraised it at 3 and1/2 times what I paid for it!

I do NOT know him, he is NOT a friend of mine - I couldn't even tell you who "he" is - (I dropped the ring off and picked it up before he came and went.)

 

There was no real "grade promised'. When I talked to Rudi, I was very specific in my description of what I wanted.

I wanted it to look white, have NO visible inclusions, No carbon, and it should be very clear and sparkley. I wanted it to LOOK like and H/VS2 (I had an engagement ring GIA certified with this grading - I gave it back).

I have seen many rings with less quality looking as good if not better - depending on the cut , how their set and so on...I just didn't want to see ANYTHING , from ANY angle, and I wanted it to be crystal clear, white, and LOOSE - BOY DID THEY DELIVER!!! This truly is a spactacular diamond!

 

I will let you know what the appraisal says when it comes.

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I took it to Goldsmith Jewelers in Orlando, FL.

The GIA appraiser I did not speak with (the cert will be mailed to me).

I did speak with the owner, and he said it was beautiful (of course).

He appraised it at 3 and1/2 times what I paid for it!

I do NOT know him, he is NOT a friend of mine - I couldn't even tell you who "he" is - (I dropped the ring off and picked it up before he came and went.)

 

 

I will let you know what the appraisal says when it comes.

I'm glad to hear you're so satisfied with your purchase.

 

I'm very curious about your appraisal experience. Just out of curiosity, since you don't know who the appraiser is, presumably you've done no research at all into their credibility. Why did you choose them? Am I correct in reading in your post that the owner provided you with a generous value conclusion prior to anyone actually grading the stones or evaluating the piece? Can you explain how this worked?

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Interesting....so you called up and said "Give me a diamond- I don't care what color or clarity- or even the price- just make sure it's eye clean"

 

Why not just buy a CZ?

 

Jeez, we are so unlucky- our shoppers actually want to know what we're selling!

 

Another few points:

Based on your words, you are not getting a "cert"- just an appraisal.

There's no such a thing as a GIA gemologist.

 

and a question- when they told you the appraised value, did they mention what was the basis for the number? Insurance replacement for example.

Does Goldsmith Jewelers in Orlando, FL sell diamonds? They told you that they would have had to charge 3.5 times the price you paid??

All very unusual stuff here.....

 

 

IN any case, I'd really be careful based on the terrible experiences others have very clearly documented.

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  • 4 weeks later...

For everyone, AVOID Shenoa Co. and any and all of their partners. I didn't buy anything online because of lack of trust. So I went to the store in New York City and still got cheated out of my money.

 

Don't even believe what they ask from you! I bought an engagement ring and when I asked about the return policy they assured me that the 30 day return is valid on all purchases (I asked because online it says 7 days). Two and a half weeks later I wanted to return the ring because I got rejected and they laughed on me. They expalined to me that nobody offers return policy of such kind (they don't consider Zales to be a jewelry store, they take returns). The saddest is that sales person and manager the same, they protect each other like a dog protects its puppies. Unfortunately, I have no grounds to sue them.

 

I was and I am upset, furious, and disappointed. Shenoa is the least professional of all and they don't deserve to exist. To all who is considering to purchase from them, don't do it, or at least search and read for comments! It is easier to learn from my mistake Guys!

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I took it to Goldsmith Jewelers in Orlando, FL.

The GIA appraiser I did not speak with (the cert will be mailed to me).

I did speak with the owner, and he said it was beautiful (of course).

He appraised it at 3 and1/2 times what I paid for it!

I do NOT know him, he is NOT a friend of mine - I couldn't even tell you who "he" is - (I dropped the ring off and picked it up before he came and went.)

 

 

I will let you know what the appraisal says when it comes.

I'm glad to hear you're so satisfied with your purchase.

 

I'm very curious about your appraisal experience. Just out of curiosity, since you don't know who the appraiser is, presumably you've done no research at all into their credibility. Why did you choose them? Am I correct in reading in your post that the owner provided you with a generous value conclusion prior to anyone actually grading the stones or evaluating the piece? Can you explain how this worked?

 

Neil

I know the owners of the jewelery store - not the appraiser. When I picked up the ring, he told me what the appraiser had said about its' worth. I am still waiting on the "formal" appraisal to come in the mail :)

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It is interesting that when someone writes a bad review everyone just accepts it as fact, yet when I wrote about my expierence, everyone picks it apart and trys to find holes in my success. I had a GREAT expierence! Why is that so hard to grasp?

I am sure that Shenoa sells HUNDREDS of diamonds a week - yet there are only a few complaints. Why is it so hard to believe that the other 95% of the people are happy?

I used to be a dog groomer - I had a HUGE boarding kennel and we had a data base of over 8000 clients. (yes 8000)

MOST of the people were thrilled with what we did. Some people didn't like us - oh well - we tried our best, but I'm sure if you heard their story - we wronged them in some way and it could not be fixed.

You can't please all of the people all of the time, and I feel like these complaints on this site are just a handfull of people. What about all of the rest of the people who have had good expierences - like me!

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