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Prince Cut Diamond


RChallen
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Has anyone ever come across a Prince Cut diamond? It's a variation of the traditional emerald cut stone. Baily Banks and Biddle are currently marketing the cut. It has a lot more brilliance and shimmer than the traditional emerald cut.

 

It comes across as if it was their own patented design, but I'm having a hard time believing that.

 

Any comments would be most appreciated.

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I'm sure it's legit if it's coming from Bailey Banks & Biddle.

 

However, be aware that patented designs are a little ploy to try to get you to pay more, and I have doubts about their claim about it being "more brilliant". I'd go with generic.

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  • 1 year later...
I'm sure it's legit if it's coming from Bailey Banks & Biddle.

 

However, be aware that patented designs are a little ploy to try to get you to pay more, and I have doubts about their claim about it being "more brilliant". I'd go with generic.

 

 

I have a prince cut diamond. I worked for a diamond dealer who is a friend of my family. He knows Avi well (since before he was a name in diamonds) and I can tell you that the stone is exactly what is advertised. As with any stone, the brilliance will be determined by a number of factors including how well the stone is cut. As far as the price goes, I’m sure that if you go to a jewelry store rather than a dealer they will try to increase the price based on the rarity of the stone. If you go to Bailey Banks & Biddle you’re going to pay for the name. The stone is actually priced like a round brilliant. So if you want to know if you’re paying too much you can open up a rapaport diamond report and find a round brilliant with equal specs. I paid about 6000 for a 1.10 carat H stone. It is 10 times more brilliant than any rectagular cut I have seen, but I also happen to have a very ideal cut diamond and a very good dealer/ gemologist who had the opportunity to choose the diamond out of a selection.

 

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This is how it's described in a trade magazine I have...

 

Prince: a diamond with 111 facets arranged like a princess cut but an emerald shape.

 

It's made by Quadamas, Inc., based here in Los Angeles, they have 2 trademarked brands, the Quadrillian and the Prince.

 

They have a website, perhaps you can educate yourself more about their product here:

http://www.princecut.com/main.swf

 

According to their website, it is patented, and they have a trademark on the PrinceCut brand name.

 

 

Kind Regards,

Yosef

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm sure it's legit if it's coming from Bailey Banks & Biddle.

 

However, be aware that patented designs are a little ploy to try to get you to pay more, and I have doubts about their claim about it being "more brilliant". I'd go with generic.

 

 

I have a prince cut diamond. I worked for a diamond dealer who is a friend of my family. He knows Avi well (since before he was a name in diamonds) and I can tell you that the stone is exactly what is advertised. As with any stone, the brilliance will be determined by a number of factors including how well the stone is cut. As far as the price goes, I’m sure that if you go to a jewelry store rather than a dealer they will try to increase the price based on the rarity of the stone. If you go to Bailey Banks & Biddle you’re going to pay for the name. The stone is actually priced like a round brilliant. So if you want to know if you’re paying too much you can open up a rapaport diamond report and find a round brilliant with equal specs. I paid about 6000 for a 1.10 carat H stone. It is 10 times more brilliant than any rectagular cut I have seen, but I also happen to have a very ideal cut diamond and a very good dealer/ gemologist who had the opportunity to choose the diamond out of a selection.

 

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  • 3 years later...

Prince Cut is exactly as you described 111 facets which are engineered to create a brilliant scintillation.

 

On the traditional emerald, all the facets are cut parallel to the girdle, this inherently creates a very clean and glassy appearance, where you can see right through the stone. Similar to a step cut diamond, or an Asscher Cut.

 

With Prince Cut the facets are angled to bounce the light around in infinitely more directions to create the sparkle and brilliance that diamonds are cherished for. The Prince Cut was developed by Avi Paz Fancy Limited in Israel, and Quadamas promoted the cut in the US.

 

post-120444-028312800 1287001861_thumb.jpg

 

 

We at Quadamas have recently developed our newest creation, The Asscher Cut Princess Diamond. It is a combination of the Asscher Cut Shape and the brilliance of a Princess. All of our Asscher Cut Princess diamonds are cut with the angles of round diamonds in order to yield maximum brilliance from every stone. The faceting arrangement itself is the result of years of optical research and has tested very well, typically receiving light return grades well into the "Ideal" scale.

 

To learn more about the Asscher Cut Princess Diamond, please visit us at http://www.AsscherCutPrincess.com or call us at 213.995.9595 x 15

 

Sincerely,

David Itzkowitz

Quadamas, Inc.

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Hi David,

 

That's interesting, I wish you the best of luck with it. I do have a question though. Did you license the name 'Asscher' for this? I understand that people use these terms generically in the marketplace and most folks don't much care but as someone who is on the receiving end of this with your Quadrillion brand I would expect you to be sensitive to it. Isn't Asscher a registered trademark?

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