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What is a brilliant diamond these days?


GFORCE100
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Hello,

 

We know that a true brilliant diamond has 58 facets, has done for years on end, and despite time it's served us well.

 

These days one cannot help but stumble across all kinds of varitions, a Leo cut diamond, a diamond cut with 88 facets, another with 73 and so forth.

 

The reasl question is is the average consumer being fooled into something that's more perfect when it's not? It seems to be a number game, the more facets the better our diamond will sparkle etc.

 

It all seems like a marketing game to me, and do they sparkle any more? My eyes tell me the answer is no and one should instead focus on the diamond's cut proportions being the prime concern.

 

What have you others found on this topic?

 

It's like other so called "secrets" few choose to tell the many others out there, such as why are diamonds expensive. Of course they're rare (at least the good clarity/color grades) but business works on numbers and not visuals, it's the few others that choose to limit the rate at which their mined thus keep them "artificially rare" and in effect have reasons to bring up the price. It's all like the oil business with the only difference being that oil drives western economies...diamonds only drive the pleasure of a some individuals (even though it's also a massive market).

 

Anyway, that was off topic but anyhow....this thing with ever more facets is seeming like a neat marketing game devised to give those undecided buyers that little something to sway the purchases....and charge a little more for it in the process (kill two birds with one stone anyone?).

 

You agree, disagree, what are your thoughts - please do share, I haven't found a topic on this in our forum yet so this is I believe interesting.

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Several topics mixed together here.

 

‘Brilliant’ is usually used in diamond cutting to describe a facet pattern on the pavilion side of a stone. The facets radiate from the culet to the girdle with a set of facets below the girdle line that produce the distinctive look. The modern Round Brilliant is the 58 facet pattern you mention but the are many others including various non-round ships that are also called brilliant. If you look at a GIA report for a princess cut, for example, they usually call them ‘modified square brilliant’.

 

The total amount of light you see coming from a stone has to do with the facet geometry, the lighting environment and your vision, not the facet count. Increasing the number of facets will break the light into more sparkles that are smaller but this doesn’t affect the total amount of light being returned. This does cause diamonds with different designs to look quite different and many people like the look but this is an artistic issue, not a physics question.

 

I suppose you can call it a neat marketing game if you wish. I call it business. Cutters are manufacturing products that they are hoping their customers will like well enough that they’ll to be willing to pay a little extra. This is bad?

 

Diamonds are expensive because they are difficult to produce and consumers seem to prefer certain stones over others. Not all diamonds are expensive. Most diamonds are sold for less than $10/ct. to industrial users. Jewelry customers tend to prefer larger, transparent stones that have been fashioned by a manufacturer into something that makes pretty jewelry. People can get very selective about exactly what they want and this tends to drive the prices up. Less popular stones are considerably less expensive. It’s true that mining companies are interested in producing stones at approximately the same rate that they can sell them and still make a profit but this dynamic is hardly unique to the mining business. Everyone from car manufacturers to farmers must make the same sorts of decisions.

 

Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ISA NAJA

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You are correct in thinking that extra facets is a marketing gimmick. Extra facets do not always equate to better light performance. Neither does the tern *ideal* cut or hearts and arrows images under little scopes. We've seen some stones that were brighter that were not ideal or H&A and I definitely seen brighter stones with the standard 57 facets versus some of the extra facet stones out there.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey GeForce (btw I love Nvidia's GeForce line :)

 

Great questions. I happen to be a distributor of 2 modified rounds that feature more faceting than the standard round brilliant cuts but let me qualify that we are NOT crazy about a diamond *just because* it features more facets.

 

100 facets cut to the wrong angles will still result in a basically lifeless stone, however if it has one optical metric that may stand out it would probably be that of scintillation. Ie. the observance of many tiny sparkles as the diamond/observer/light source is moved.

 

Now... there are cutting factories who have added more facets but at the same time are cutting their stones to angles that compliment and flatter light return/brightness/fire/scintillation. THESE are the kind of modified rounds GeForce, that when you compare them to standard rounds you'll see a world of difference and they'll blow them away. When compared to H&A rounds, have a distinctly different look which some either prefer or do not prefer as that comparison is not one between a dull stone vs a pretty but a pretty vs pretty. Ie. 2 beautiful stones with different personalities. One of the distinct differences in this comparison would also be that of scintillation.

 

Firms that are cutting modified rounds with an eye for light performance are altering the optical design of their products and our studies are finding that these kind of stones are redirecting even more light perpendicular to the table (some of the most effective reflections within).

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Hey GeForce (btw I love Nvidia's GeForce line :)

 

Great questions.  I happen to be a distributor of 2 modified rounds that feature more faceting than the standard round brilliant cuts but let me qualify that we are NOT crazy about a diamond *just because* it features more facets.

 

100 facets cut to the wrong angles will still result in a basically lifeless stone, however if it has one optical metric that may stand out it would probably be that of scintillation.  Ie. the observance of many tiny sparkles as the diamond/observer/light source is moved.

 

Now... there are cutting factories who have added more facets but at the same time are cutting their stones to angles that compliment and flatter light return/brightness/fire/scintillation.  THESE are the kind of modified rounds GeForce, that when you compare them to standard rounds you'll see a world of difference and they'll blow them away. When compared to H&A rounds, have a distinctly different look which some either prefer or do not prefer as that comparison is  not one between a dull stone vs a pretty but a pretty vs pretty.  Ie. 2 beautiful stones with different personalities.  One  of the distinct differences in this comparison would also be that of scintillation. 

 

Firms that are cutting modified rounds with an eye for light performance are altering the optical design of their products and our studies are finding that these kind of stones are redirecting even more light perpendicular to the table (some of the most effective reflections within).

 

While I can appreciate such diamonds as LEO diamonds, Eightstar diamonds, Forever diamonds, and others it seems to me this is being used too much as a marketing tool rather than presenting true value for money.

 

I say this because I've come across for example Forever diamonds with the 73 facets being sold as wonderful, more sparkle, more fire etc. but on the other hand having seen its IGI report I find:

 

Clarity P1/I1

Cut Good

Color I

Symmetry Very good

 

Now in my mind if someone is saying how wonderful their diamond is that obviously I'm supposed to first faint then buy without hesitation (the average Joe six pack comparison) then why spoil it with very poor clarity, to a lesser extent color (though come on people, H isn't that expensive), standard cut, and plausible symmetry?

 

It's either do something excellent all the way or don't do it all. Poeple think ah it's 73 facets so it must be "special" but the company stakeholders are usually just smiling at how easy it is to shift a load of I1 diamonds.

 

And in the above example they put it in 18ct gold just so it sounds better than 9ct gold when in fact does an I1 clarity diamond deserve anything better than 9ct gold - I think not. Yet again some marketing is at play here.

 

So I'm open as to differently cut RB's but come on folks, lets stop (for those who are doing it, usually the big companies) fooling people into buying purely based on the number of facets. I'm a quality freak myself so VVS/D,E,F but even if I was to pretend for a while I'm the average consumer I would not want my diamond to be anything less than SI1.

 

I mean honestly, let's not spoil the girl's heart here but lets face it, I1 diamonds are if I was to be somewhat sarcastic industrial diamonds or very close to.

 

The only way I can somehow say OK do sell I1 clarity diamonds to consumers (even if you try all the extra facet marketing mumbo jumbo) is if they are clarity enhanced and sold as such.

 

I am perhaps one of few (maybe not hopefuly) but I just feel guilty if I were to give my woman an I1/P1 clarity diamond and attempt to fool her into how it's wonderful because it has more facets.

 

I would rather want to say hey I got you a VVS, a D-F, or the reason why it's so wonderful is because I made sure to select the best Ideal cut I could find - and then should it have more facets add oh and I've decided to get you one that has a different sparkle representation than a standard RB.

 

I would feel bad about using the fact of the extra facets as the first one and only reason I think my purchase is great.

 

It just bugs me that a major respected chain is doing this and I'm sure I could find others too, after all I guess this is one of the aspects of ratail shopping.

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Hey Gman,

 

I totally know where you're coming from. Hey ... don't think for a moment that I don't get pitched this line of crap from the wholesale front. We get calls from suppliers quite frequently who have "unlocked the secret", "have the most beautiful stones at the best prices" etc ad nauseum.

 

While we feature and carry stones like your describing (D-F, IF-VVS) I would place heavier emphasis on the optical properties of the diamond and the metrics that will be coming on teh new GIA/AGS reports with regards to brightness, fire, scintillation, weight ratio, durability, polish & symmetry.

 

While we're having fun knocking the modified rounds lets not throw the baby out with the bath water either. We gotta give kudo's to the companies who are adding more facets and improving light performance. Ie. diamonds like Eighternity, Solasfera and Star129 are good examples of such companies who are accomplishing this.

 

Good posts.

 

Peace out.

Rhino

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Maxed light performance can be had in "I" colors and "I-1" clarity with good to very good polish and symmetry and with the standard 58 facets. More facets does not guarantee a more beautiful stone.

 

1. Facet angle.

2. facet size,

3. facet placement and alignment

 

are the key components.

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And excellent make (cut) stones will do a heckuva better job hiding the inclusions in an I1 too. At least better than worse makes. I've seen some I1's you had in the past Barry that looked very decent.

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