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Brenda3

Diamond chipped - Help!

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I can't believe the unthinkable happened!

 

I went to have my diamond checked by a jeweler because it looked "strange" in it's setting suddenly, and the jeweler told me a small piece had chipped right under the prong. He then proceeded to show me a bunch of replacement diamonds.

 

What can I do here? Do I have to buy a new diamond?Is there a way to fix this?? The jeweler didn't seem to indicate there was.

 

Does anyone have a good suggestion?

 

From,

Brenda

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Depending on the extent and location of the "chip", the stone can be recut with minimum weight loss and shape alteration so that it will again fit into your setting. Tell your jeweler that you want to explore this option. All jewelers have access to this service through their wholesale diamond suppliers.

 

Have an estimate provided in writing detailing the finished carat weight,

whether the finished product will again fit into your ring, and total cost to do the job.

 

Contact your insurance company.

 

Of course, the jeweler makes more money selling you a new diamond. Explore the repair option first.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
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Let us know what happens.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

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Of course, the ability to recut depends on the extent of the damage. But, given that you mentioned that the chip appeared to be at the prong, you should be able to do fairly well.

 

If the jeweler plays dumb on the option to recut, tell him/her that you have a sentimental attachment to THAT diamond...


"Fish and Visitors stink after three days"

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My mom's diamond has a small chip in it (very hard to see with the naked eye, but you could feel it). A jeweler put the chip under a prong and you can't even see it anymore. I don't know if yours is small enough to do that.

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Not always the best idea. That "chip" can become a crater and you won't see it grow because it's under the prong. Always have a competent gemologist assess the damage.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

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Hi guys,

 

I went back to the jeweler. Mind you, this is the place I bought the ring from 3 years ago. The jeweler told me he was sure the chip was too big to mess with getting the ring recut. I don't know that much about diamonds, but to me it looks possible.

 

I'm thinking of going to another jeweler. Sort of a second opinion like at the doctors. What do you think? Will I just be told the same thing?

 

From,

Brenda

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That is ridiculous. No chip is too big and any diamond can be recut/repolished. It sounds like they are too lazy to take on the job.

 

It was mentioned in this thread that you should get "in writing" what the finished weight will be. I would just add that it takes special measuring equipment to be able to accurately determine what the finished weight will be and even at that it would only be an estimate so do not hold your breath for predetermined weights in writing. :( Most jewelers do not have that measuring device.

 

Try all your local options and MAKE SURE you have a positive way of identifying your diamond should you have them send it off to be recut. Bringing it to a good local appraiser who can identify it after the recutting would be the course to take. If you can't get any help locally then perhaps you'll want to seek help via the net.

 

Peace,


<a href='http://www.goodoldgold.com' target='_blank'>www.goodoldgold.com</a>

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Absolutely, get a second opinion from another jeweler. In the meantime you should let your Insurance co. know that your diamond has a damage. Find out what coverage you have and type of re-imbursement.

 

Keep in mind that if you do go the route of re-cutting/repair that placing the diamond on the cutting wheel also entails a degree of risk due to the tremendous heat and friction that is generated. If further breakage occurs, be clear and get in writing from the jeweler your compensation and replacement.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

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Thanks! I hadn't actually thought about calling my insurance company. I thought that was for losing it. I'll call them tomorrow. Will they pay for having it recut do you think??

 

From,

Brenda

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Brenda,

 

At the risk of sounding self serving, consider hiring an independent expert to help. There are actually several items that may come into play and many jewelers are unfamiliar with the issues surrounding recutting and repair of stones. It’s a question of weighing the expected costs of the cutter, the jeweler to pull and reset the stone, the repair any prong damage, etc. against the expected value of the final stone and the risks inherent in the cutting process. Many insurance companies cover this kind of damage and you should definitely consult with them first. If they process a claim, the cost of the appraisal consultation will usually become part of that claim (which is part of the reason for talking to the company first).

 

Even if they cover the cutting, the claim should cover the ‘loss in value’ of the final stone.

 

Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ISA NAJA

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