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Standard vs Handmade Setting for Martini Stud Earrings


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I need help finding the best martini setting for a large pair (about 5ctw) pair of stud earrings.  I understand that some online sellers offer a standard and somewhat unstable martini setting, while others offer a handmade, modified martini setting with a more stable base that can help to reduce droop.  Is my understanding correct?  Can members of the community provide guidance?  What if the setting I prefer is not offered by the merchant with the diamonds I prefer? Thank you for your kind assistance.

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I think you are mixing up two things - one is the design of the setting: a 'pure' martini setting with a large stone will tend to be uncomfortable because the pointed base of the setting will have to be pulled into your ear with some force to counteract its own weight and the weight of the stone (and conversely, whatever you put on the other side to hold the post will have to be pushed with some force into the back of your earlobe). So people modify the design, giving it a more stable, wider base. Which makes it no longer look like a martini setting, but it's comfortable. I've also seen people use transparent plastic discs that sit between the bottom of the setting and the earlobe, but in my opinion they look a bit naff.

The second is 'who' can provide it, and the answer is that if you are spending several tens of thousands in stones, people will source you the setting you want, or have it made.

The real 'conflict', in my opinion, is that the 'martini' design, with a pointed base and using light gauge wires, often with only 3 prongs, was invented to hold small stones... and over 2 ct is definitely not small.

The only recommendations I would give you are: 1) to pay as much attention to the back of the earrings as to the front; a larger back will be more effective at supporting/stiffening the earlobe and spreading the load - not to mention making the earring safer/less difficult to lose; and 2) to privilege - at least a bit - comfort vs. appearance. My wife has plenty of earrings she liked 'in the box' that she doesn't wear much as she finds them uncomfortable after a couple of hours.

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Thank you, DavidELevi, for your kind reply and insight.  Can you tell me a little bit more about a standard casting vs. a custom setting? There is definitely a difference between the martini settings at Tiffany and at James Allen.  Is that likely the difference I am observing?  Since 99 percent of the cost of a pair of large studs is in the stones, I hate to pay Tiffany prices just to get a nice setting.

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Yes, there is a difference. Very likely the Tiffany setting is fabricated (built from wire soldered together) rather than cast - and matched to the stone more carefully, and finished better. Plenty of people other than Tiffany that can build something to that standard. Or in between. Or better.

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 There's a strong argument that building such things out of wire produces a more durable product than casting. People use the word 'martini' to describe several different designs but nearly all of them come to a point at the back where the post is attached, sort of in the shape of a traditional martini glass. The other big variable is the presence of a seating ring right below the girdle of the stone that ties the prongs together. This improves the security considerably no matter how it's made but it changes the look. 

As Davide points out, the problem you're likely to find is how they hang, and your problem is gravity. You can't fix it. Martini settings tend to tip forward in every case, but especially with heavy stones and lightweight backs. Buying from Tiffany's won't help. The customary solution to this is to use 'low base' type settings, where the prongs attach to a a round disk next to the ear. It's all behind the stone so you can't see it when it's worn. It also helps to use extra large clutches. If you have an opportunity and this isn't a surprise, you might want to talk to your neighborhood jeweler about it. Perhaps even try something on to see if it annoys her. 

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Anthony Constantinou | Anthony Constantinou CEO CWM FX says For diamond and jewelry companies, having an Internet presence is no longer a luxury; it is critical to success in business. But it is not enough just to be visible. Customers today expect to see what merchandise you are offering, and then to be able to buy online at whatever time suits them.

 

Sometimes it might be dangerous to purchase diamond rings on the net. So you can check out some customer reviews and look at forums to know the store’s reputation.

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12 minutes ago, anthony_constantinou_ceo said:

Sometimes it might be dangerous to purchase diamond rings on the net. So you can check out some customer reviews and look at forums to know the store’s reputation.

And this is relevant to the OP's question in which way?

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