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Cracked diamond?


Bw302808
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So something changed with my diamond. The best way I can describe the change is that it was like a light bulb burned out in my diamond. It just wasn’t glowing like it did before. In the first photo from 8/31, you can see my diamond before it changed. In the second photo from 9/25 you can see it after. Is there new damage? I was told there wasn’t. I did notice that the diamond was not centered in the setting.

 

 

Screenshot 2021-12-18 at 4.47.18 PM.png

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Edited by Bw302808
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Do you have a grading report that accompanied this diamond? 

Was this a fractured filled diamond? Did it go for a wash in an ultra sonic cleaner? 

I think the fractures are now more visible and the apparent clarity of this diamond has changed/went down after an ultra sonic wash. 

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23 minutes ago, Furqan Shafi said:

Do you have a grading report that accompanied this diamond? 

Was this a fractured filled diamond? Did it go for a wash in an ultra sonic cleaner? 

I think the fractures are now more visible and the apparent clarity of this diamond has changed/went down after an ultra sonic wash. 

I’ll have to ask my fiancé about the grading report. But no ultra sonic cleaner. My finger was swollen from a surgery I had so the ring was stuck on my finger. It took a good amount of effort to get it off. It was once I put the ring back on after that that it looked different. I was wondering if maybe I pushed the diamond down on the right side, making it crooked in the setting, if maybe that would make the color look off. Or maybe I pushed too hard on the left side of the diamond where it’s weaker from the surface inclusion and it maybe spidered.

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That sounds quite unlikely - the diamond has been under a lot more pressure (and heat) when it was being cut than you can put on it by pulling and pushing with your ring on another finger. You'd be in severe pain way before the diamond noticed any pressure/stress.

It is possible that you twisted the setting, from which the need to re-tighten the prongs, but damaging the stone... not really.

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28 minutes ago, davidelevi said:

That sounds quite unlikely - the diamond has been under a lot more pressure (and heat) when it was being cut than you can put on it by pulling and pushing with your ring on another finger. You'd be in severe pain way before the diamond noticed any pressure/stress.

It is possible that you twisted the setting, from which the need to re-tighten the prongs, but damaging the stone... not really.

Well this gives me hope then. So would twisting the setting make the clarity/color look different?

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Nope. It is possible that it was damaged when tightening the prongs, either by heat or mechanically. It is possible that it was fracture-filled and for whatever reason the filling failed (again, heat or mechanical pressure - applied by tools, not your other hand). Just moving the diamond in the setting will not fundamentally alter the way in which it looks.

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On 12/18/2021 at 7:57 PM, davidelevi said:

Nope. It is possible that it was damaged when tightening the prongs, either by heat or mechanically. It is possible that it was fracture-filled and for whatever reason the filling failed (again, heat or mechanical pressure - applied by tools, not your other hand). Just moving the diamond in the setting will not fundamentally alter the way in which it looks.

Ok. So if the filling did happen to fail, is it possible to fill again? And if so, do you think this is something that would be covered under my warranty? 

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I dont think this will be covered under warranty. However if it was a clarity enhanced diamond it should have accompanied some care instructions and should have been handed over to the original seller for any cleanings or repairs. Since that didn't happen the warranty is very likely void. 

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22 minutes ago, Furqan Shafi said:

I dont think this will be covered under warranty. However if it was a clarity enhanced diamond it should have accompanied some care instructions and should have been handed over to the original seller for any cleanings or repairs. Since that didn't happen the warranty is very likely void. 

It’s always been cleaned and repaired by the original seller so that shouldn’t be an issue. I was just curious if it’s even possible to fill again. I just feel like I’m at a dead end road. It’s clear in the pictures that the color/clarity is different, and I’m desperate to get my diamond looking like it did in the top photo again.

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8 minutes ago, Bw302808 said:

So if the filling did happen to fail, is it possible to fill again?

In general, yes.

8 minutes ago, Bw302808 said:

this is something that would be covered under my warranty?

Possibly - and possibly not - Furqan has listed some of the issues to consider. The aspect I'd like to add is that if the original vendor has not disclosed that the stone was treated, that is fraud.

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4 minutes ago, davidelevi said:

In general, yes.

Possibly - and possibly not - Furqan has listed some of the issues to consider. The aspect I'd like to add is that if the original vendor has not disclosed that the stone was treated, that is fraud.

Thanks David. I really do appreciate your advice and opinion on this

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On 12/20/2021 at 11:26 AM, denverappraiser said:

Get it appraised by an expert who both knows what to look for and can inspect the stone in person. Guessing based on photographs is going to lead you to trouble. Where are you and I'll try to make you a referral. 

Thank you for this advice. I’m in Yorktown, VA. What is this pinkish brown spot that’s circled? This is a photo from before I noticed a change.

image59071562.JPG

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It could be a lot of things, from a reflection of something in the environment (were you/the photographer wearing a red shirt or dress?) to a capture of light refracted and dispersed within the stone, to a possible 'tell' from fracture filling, to an artefact in the photo.

Without having the stone in hand (and under a loupe), all guesses are valid...

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21 hours ago, davidelevi said:

It could be a lot of things, from a reflection of something in the environment (were you/the photographer wearing a red shirt or dress?) to a capture of light refracted and dispersed within the stone, to a possible 'tell' from fracture filling, to an artefact in the photo.

Without having the stone in hand (and under a loupe), all guesses are valid...

I did find another photo from a different day with this reddish spot again. I will get the ring appraised to find out for sure what’s going on with it. Do appraisals void warranties? I asked the customer service representative that I’ve been corresponding with about my ring if the diamond was fracture filled and she said no. If it comes back from the appraiser that it was fracture filled, I will be back here for more advice as I have no idea how to proceed from there. Thanks again for all of your guidance here. I truly appreciate it.

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Edited by Bw302808
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This one (the brownish-pink bit) looks more like a reflection from the environment, possibly someone's face or hand. Did the diamond come with any paperwork, like a lab report?

1 hour ago, Bw302808 said:

Do appraisals void warranties?

In no way whatsoever; the appraiser is just going to look at the diamond (and the ring, if you ask them to) with a loupe, and possibly a microscope - there is no way anyone other than you and the appraiser would even know that it has happened, until you choose to disclose it.

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On 12/22/2021 at 4:01 PM, Bw302808 said:

Thank you for this advice. I’m in Yorktown, VA. What is this pinkish brown spot that’s circled? This is a photo from before I noticed a change.

image59071562.JPG

Yorktown is a small town way out of my zone. Try this:

National Association of Jewelry Appraisers www.najaappraisers.org
American Society of Appraisers www.appraisers.org
American Gem Society www.ags.org

 I know a good one in DC but that seems a bit far on the Google map. It seems likely there's someone closer. In DC my go-to guy is Martin Fuller.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Anthony Constantinou | Anthony Constantinou CEO CWM FX says Diamonds are very hard because carbon atoms make a strong bond with each other. In this rigid network atoms cannot move. Soft light needs to be created so that you don't get too much glare, which is really tough.

A neat hardness chart will give you brief idea about diamond clarity and glare. You can use this to identify, which diamonds will reflect the least. You will have to consider a host of other technical specifications as well with regards to the camera being used.

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1 hour ago, anthony_constantinou_ceo said:

A neat hardness chart will give you brief idea about diamond clarity and glare.

What exactly does this mean? I'm sorry, but it makes no sense to me. By and large, hardness in a crystalline diamond is nothing to do with clarity or glare.

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18 hours ago, davidelevi said:

What exactly does this mean? I'm sorry, but it makes no sense to me. By and large, hardness in a crystalline diamond is nothing to do with clarity or glare.

Oh...Diamond hardness depends on its purity, crystalline perfection, and orientation: hardness is higher for flawless, pure crystals oriented

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12 minutes ago, anthony_constantinou_ceo said:

Oh...Diamond hardness depends on its purity, crystalline perfection, and orientation: hardness is higher for flawless, pure crystals oriented

Only to a VERY limited and uninfluential degree unless one is a diamond cutter - and that limited degree is in no way detectable from a lab report: "flawless" for clarity purposes does not at all imply that the atomic lattice is perfectly structured - plenty of 'flawless' Type IaA diamonds that contain significant amounts of nitrogen and contain grain boundaries. None of that is measurable through a 'hardness chart' (whatever that may be).

Which begs the other question: how is this in any way relevant to the OP's question?

 

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