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Joel Samson

8,000 carat natural black diamond from africa

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Dear fellow members, I'm Joel from the Philippines,. I have a natural black diamond weighs is 8,000 carat single stone and density of 3.2g/cm,Luster is Metallic...,I hope someone can help me to certify my black diamond...Thank You.,.

 

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IMG20210610132228.jpg

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Hi Joel, welcome to Diamond Review!

I think the first thing you should do is to find a gemmologist (relatively) local to you and confirm identification as a diamond; then you can think about incurring the significant expenses involved in getting the stone to a first-rate lab (GIA has labs in Hong Kong, Taipei - 2 hours flight away) and graded.

100% gem species identification from photos is effectively impossible, but some things can be ruled out, and I for one have severe doubts that what you have in the pictures is a diamond.


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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It depends on porosity 

Porosity. As the porosity of an object increases, its apparent density decreases, because the voids take up more and more of the volume. In carbonado, the number of exposed micro­diamond cutting points increases with porosity. This was a sought-after property that made carbonado more expensive by weight than diamond at the turn of the twentieth century (Haggerty, 2014). Densities as low as 2.8 g/cm3 and as high as 3.45 g/cm3, with most around 3.05 g/cm3 (Trueb and De Wys, 1969; Haggerty, 2014), are in contrast to gem diamond at 3.52 g/cm3.

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https://www.gia.edu/gems-gemology/summer-2017-carbonado-diamond

It depends on porosity 

Porosity. As the porosity of an object increases, its apparent density decreases, because the voids take up more and more of the volume. In carbonado, the number of exposed micro­diamond cutting points increases with porosity. This was a sought-after property that made carbonado more expensive by weight than diamond at the turn of the twentieth century (Haggerty, 2014). Densities as low as 2.8 g/cm3 and as high as 3.45 g/cm3, with most around 3.05 g/cm3 (Trueb and De Wys, 1969; Haggerty, 2014), are in contrast to gem diamond at 3.52 g/cm3.

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