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Knot in Diamond


Renae Sims
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I am looking at purchasing a 1.41 I VS2 diamond. The Key on the GIA report has "Knot" listed a the 1st inclusion. Should I be concerned about the knot in the diamond. Could the Knot be covered by a prong? I have included the GIA report. 

 

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Short answers: no, don't be concerned, and probably yes, it could be covered.

You should not be worried about integrity or durability - in GIA's opinion there is no danger, otherwise they would have graded the stone 'I', not 'VS' for clarity. 'Knot' is a technical term for 'a small diamond crystal inside the main one, breaching the polished surface of the finished stone'. When you think that the surface of the knot has been cut and polished at very high temperatures and pressures and the knot has not moved, you probably understand why.

Also, the report shows that the knot is located on the pavilion side of the stone, which makes it better protected from everyday impacts, and probably less visible.

As to whether you should have the knot covered by a part of the setting (it could be a prong or part of the basket/seat) - it is very likely possible, depending on how your setting is made, but whether it is necessary or advisable is a different question: some inclusions become more visible, not less, when 'covered' that way. Ask the setter!

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See map below

Picture1.png.aae284a550e217d3c4ffccd4b7c2c04b.png

none of these are anything to be concerned about, unless they are easily visible (in which case the concern is only to do with that - not durability, integrity or light performance). In a VS2 it is very unlikely that inclusions are visible with the naked eye, but we have no way of knowing. What does the vendor say?

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He is telling me that this is a very good diamond. Are those clouds really small? I purchased a diamond for a big box jewelry store and when it came in it was very cloudy. The GIA report was very clean ( I mean only two small dots) almost too clean. The comments on the GIA report said "Clarity based on clouds not shown" and it was the only comment. The diamond was a SI1 and did not sparkle much at all. For this reason I an concerned when I see a clump of clouds like this on a report.

Does the cut look excellent?

 

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50 minutes ago, Renae Sims said:

He is telling me that this is a very good diamond.

That's not an answer to the specific question you asked... 😉
Do you trust the vendor? Do they have a good reputation? Has anybody you know used them? Do they have a good return policy?

51 minutes ago, Renae Sims said:

The GIA report was very clean ( I mean only two small dots) almost too clean. The comments on the GIA report said "Clarity based on clouds not shown"

That is a pretty significant question mark, if not an outright red flag:

1. The clarity grade is not based on the two small dots, but on the clouds;
2. The clouds are not shown on the plot because either there are too many of them, or they are so large that they basically take up the whole stone, so plotting them does not help to identify the diamond (which is the purpose of the plot).

While it's not always the case, SI diamonds with 'clarity based on clouds not shown' can be cloudy/dull...

55 minutes ago, Renae Sims said:

Are those clouds really small?

Who knows! Direct observation is the only way to tell for certain; the word of a trusted vendor is a good second choice. A plot on a GIA report is worth much less, but the fact that GIA chose to represent those clouds as separate, individual clouds rather than one larger one makes me think they are likely to be quite small.

1 hour ago, Renae Sims said:

Does the cut look excellent?

Given the information available on a GIA report, you'd struggle to find a report that 'reads' better, as far as cut proportions are concerned. Does it make it 'the most wonderfully cut diamond ever'? Not enough information to say; what is there looks genuinely excellent.

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Thank you. The vendor is very well known in the Dallas, texas area. He did tell me if I am not satisficed that I have 30 days to get 100% refund. They also have a policy that after one year you can trade in the diamond for 110% of what you paid towards another diamond.  

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Well... it sounds very reasonable to me. Unless you have many other candidates (or this is 'good, but a real budget stretch'), what have you got to lose? Look at it as getting a free preview of the diamond, and making a decision about whether to buy or not a month later.

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  • 1 month later...
On 4/26/2021 at 7:41 PM, Renae Sims said:

He is telling me that this is a very good diamond. Are those clouds really small? I purchased a diamond for a big box jewelry store and when it came in it was very cloudy. The GIA report was very clean ( I mean only two small dots) almost too clean. The comments on the GIA report said "Clarity based on clouds not shown" and it was the only comment. The diamond was a SI1 and did not sparkle much at all. For this reason I an concerned when I see a clump of clouds like this on a report.

Does the cut look excellent?

 

Apart from the report, look at the diamond itself. The report may not indicate that the stone is cloudy or already very old. 

Edited by BenLorken
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3 hours ago, BenLorken said:

Apart from the report, look at the diamond itself. The report may not indicate that the stone is cloudy

Good advice... if you can see the stone! Not always the case, even disregarding COVID-caused issues.

3 hours ago, BenLorken said:

or already very old. 

This I don't particularly agree with. If the stone were cut using very old-fashioned proportions, it would not receive a cut grade of 'Excellent' or even be classified as a "round brilliant". If a stone's surface is marred by wear, it would not be graded 'Excellent' for polish (and/or it would have a lot more external characteristics such as chips).

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It sort of depends on what you mean by a very old stone. Diamonds, by their nature, are upwards of 200 million years, give or take a few.

We don't know the history of this particular stone, and the jeweler probably doesn't either, but there are a few things we DO know.

1) On March 10, 2021 it was at GIA. It was undamaged at that time. 

2) Faceted girdles are a relatively recent innovation in cutting. Recent stones are mostly all faceted girdles, and before 2000 or so, almost none were.  

3) GIA-X doesn't usually just happen. The cutter deliberately cuts to those proportions because they want that grade. GIA didn't even define what those proportions WERE until 2006. 

All in, I think we can safely say that it's post-2006 cutting and that passed a GIA inspection in 2021. Depending on what you mean, that may still fall into 'old', but it makes me hate to admit how old I am. 

 

Edited by denverappraiser
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  • 4 weeks later...
7 hours ago, ChrisPalmer said:

knots are a type of crystal inclusion that appears as a knot on the diamond's surface

They don't. They appear like a crystal inside the diamond body 'breaking through' the surface.

7 hours ago, ChrisPalmer said:

Because the imperfection is evident to the human eye

It isn't always. This specific one - in fact - is very unlikely to be, as is the one whose photo you posted.

7 hours ago, ChrisPalmer said:

diamonds with a knot inclusion are usually given a lower clarity grade

Lower than what? An identically characterised diamond without the knot? It may be, but not necessarily: I think a knot precludes a diamond from getting anything above VS1, but it may well be graded VS1 even without the knot. This particular VS2, for example, would have been very likely been graded VS2 even without the knot .

Edited by davidelevi
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