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goldenmom7

Opinion on True hearts diamond

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Hello, I am looking at this ring on James Allen - I've been reading about what to look for in a diamond and how their "True hearts" are only 'near' flawless.  I just want to make sure this is close to flawless, due to the price, as I've read some of their True Hearts diamonds are much better than others.  Can someone please look at this diamond and certificate and give an opinion?  I am using their upgrade program so I need to shop with JA but I also want to make sure it's a fair price for the quality.  Thank you!

ETA: Here is a link to the actual diamond, with pictures: https://www.jamesallen.com/loose-diamonds/round-cut/1.02-carat-g-color-vvs1-clarity-true-hearts-cut-sku-5642785 cert.jpeg

Edited by goldenmom7

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Welcome to Diamond Review!

5 hours ago, goldenmom7 said:

"True hearts" are only 'near' flawless.  I just want to make sure this is close to flawless

Usually "flawless" in gemstones refers to the absence of (visible) inclusions and blemishes... in which case there is a fairly unambiguous definition of it. A VVS1 containing a small feather and a single pinpoint is probably pretty close.

When it comes to cut, things get more complicated. First of all because there isn't an agreed definition of what "flawless cut" would mean. It certainly would rule out polish and symmetry imperfections, and clearly "bad" proportions, but that still leaves a pretty broad range of appearances/proportions, and people have different preferences for them. H&A is one such look, but there are others that I find as beautiful if not more. What do you like/expect? Is "perfect H&A" your definition of "flawlessly executed" cut?

Secondly, there is a question as to how close is close - the diamond whose certificate you posted looks very nice on paper - and I'm sure in reality too. Does it have perfect hearts and arrows? Don't know, and can't tell from the report; a properly taken Hearts view is usually required (and it is usually there that True Hearts reveal small inconsistencies in the cut). Even then, would you notice with the naked eye a difference in symmetry implied by e.g. a cleft in one single heart? Probably not. What about two? Three? Where do you stop?

TL; DR - it's a very nice diamond in as far as it can be assessed from the report. "Flawless" - no, neither technically (it's a VVS1) nor cut-wise (since what "flawless cut" means is not defined, and there seem to be very very minor symmetry imperfections visible in the ASET - if a perfectly symmetrical stone is "flawless"). "Close to flawless"... take your pick as to the meaning of flawless and the meaning of close.


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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I am a total novice, but I have been trying to learn.  My concern is the table seems so small, and your diamond may appear smaller than it actually is.  Perhaps someone knowledgeable could comment about that.  

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4 hours ago, davidelevi said:

Welcome to Diamond Review!

Usually "flawless" in gemstones refers to the absence of (visible) inclusions and blemishes... in which case there is a fairly unambiguous definition of it. A VVS1 containing a small feather and a single pinpoint is probably pretty close.

When it comes to cut, things get more complicated. First of all because there isn't an agreed definition of what "flawless cut" would mean. It certainly would rule out polish and symmetry imperfections, and clearly "bad" proportions, but that still leaves a pretty broad range of appearances/proportions, and people have different preferences for them. H&A is one such look, but there are others that I find as beautiful if not more. What do you like/expect? Is "perfect H&A" your definition of "flawlessly executed" cut?

Secondly, there is a question as to how close is close - the diamond whose certificate you posted looks very nice on paper - and I'm sure in reality too. Does it have perfect hearts and arrows? Don't know, and can't tell from the report; a properly taken Hearts view is usually required (and it is usually there that True Hearts reveal small inconsistencies in the cut). Even then, would you notice with the naked eye a difference in symmetry implied by e.g. a cleft in one single heart? Probably not. What about two? Three? Where do you stop?

TL; DR - it's a very nice diamond in as far as it can be assessed from the report. "Flawless" - no, neither technically (it's a VVS1) nor cut-wise (since what "flawless cut" means is not defined, and there seem to be very very minor symmetry imperfections visible in the ASET - if a perfectly symmetrical stone is "flawless"). "Close to flawless"... take your pick as to the meaning of flawless and the meaning of close.

Thank you for the info!  Good points.  It is hard for me to know without seeing it in person (drawback of buying online). Here is the link to the actual diamond - to me it looks like very good hearts/arrows. https://www.jamesallen.com/loose-diamonds/round-cut/1.02-carat-g-color-vvs1-clarity-true-hearts-cut-sku-5642785

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2 hours ago, FLGIRL said:

I am a total novice, but I have been trying to learn.  My concern is the table seems so small, and your diamond may appear smaller than it actually is.  Perhaps someone knowledgeable could comment about that.  

I'm a novice, too, and trying to educate myself.  I think 54.8% is supposed to be in the excellent range but I'm using info I found on another site (a chart) so I'm not sure if I'm interpreting it correctly.  

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1 hour ago, goldenmom7 said:

I'm a novice, too, and trying to educate myself.  I think 54.8% is supposed to be in the excellent range but I'm using info I found on another site (a chart) so I'm not sure if I'm interpreting it correctly.  

AGS, which is the lab that graded this stone, uses a 3d modeling system for cut grading and it doesn't exactly map to GIA's "excellent" grade. Actually, it's quite a bit narrower. It's a complicated connection. If you're interested in how an AGS stone would be expected to grade on the GIA system, you can calculate it yourself with the parameters on the report and the tool here: https://www.gia.edu/facetware

Edited by denverappraiser

Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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19 hours ago, goldenmom7 said:

Here is the link to the actual diamond - to me it looks like very good hearts/arrows

That depends on your definition of very good. I count 4 - possibly 5 - minor clefts, one misshapen heart and two others too close to the bottom arrowhead. The arrow shafts are visibly different widths. Is any of this visible to the naked eye? Not in a million years as such (meaning you won't see the individual imperfections), but it may make a subtle difference to the overall look when compared to another diamond. Does it matter? To some it does. 🙂

18 hours ago, goldenmom7 said:

 I think 54.8% is supposed to be in the excellent range but I'm using info I found on another site (a chart)

Beware of charts purporting to be able to tell you whether a diamond is well cut based on ranges for various proportions. They are a bit like trying to figure out if a pair of shoes will fit you only based on manufacturer-stated size. You may rule some things out because they are obviously wrong, but not more than that.

Charts that include only table and depth, especially for fancy (non round) shapes, are even worse: they are a bit like trying to figure out if a pair of shoes will fit you only based on their colour.

Edited by davidelevi
added last paragraph

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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