Got Diamond Questions?
Our community of diamond experts are here to provide answers
Isobelxx

Vintage Diamond ring from mother

Recommended Posts

Hiya, nice to meet you all! Looking for some advice on this ring that was given to me by my mother. She got it from an antiques dealer many years ago. It’s just been stored away in a jewellery box for years since and she never wore it, she has now gave it to me. I’m trying to find out more about it, like how old it is and what the carat weight would be. Here are the details I know so far. It has a very high unusual setting.

7mm across and 4mm depth diamond.

18k white gold and has 2 hallmarks on outer band.

any advice info is muchly appreciated x

 

 

 

 

7F5539C5-358F-4CAF-B712-76EB17281CFE.jpeg

42A87E70-FF4C-4F78-A611-BAF7FE3E8F75.jpeg

ED375A72-E6CE-4B28-989D-4A5B96DF8E30.jpeg

9C25B404-F44D-44CE-B128-4DE0ABB90854.jpeg

BA462BA1-F608-4598-BC31-AA9673ED35D6.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome to DiamondReview!

The ring has French hallmarks for 18 kt gold, and that design (which I call "radiator fins", but I suppose it's meant to look like a sun's rays) was popular between the end of the 1920s and the 1940s. The stone is also an old(ish) cut, probably from the 1920-1940 period as well (high crown, small table, short lower girdle facets, small culet). Unfortunately I know of no systematic report of French makers marks, so who or what stands for "GXS" (?) remains a mystery.

The carat weight of the stone is very difficult to determine from photos; generally the setting was used to make smaller stones (0.25 - 0.40 ct) look larger by having light reflect off the metal, so I would guess it's roughly of that size. It could be bigger, though - it looks larger on your hand in the video, but perhaps you have very slim fingers. If you can take a measurement of the diameter I may be a little more precise.

Edited by davidelevi

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then I would say "around 1 ct"; probably over.

A well-cut modern 1 ct round brilliant is around 6.45 - 6.55 mm, and older cut stones tend to be heavier for the same diameter. A "7 mm" modern stone (precisely measured) would be probably closer to 1.25 - 1.30 ct, so if this is actually 7.00 mm (measured say with a pair of precision calipers, if not a diamond gauge) it could be as much as 1.40 ct. The only way of knowing for sure is to unset the diamond and put it on jeweller's scales.


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thankyou David! I used digital calipars and that' the results I got. I managed to measure the diamond because its quite high and could fit the calipers  underneath the diamond.  Is it an old european cut? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be, though I suspect it would be called "transitional" or "circular brilliant" by GIA.

GIA is quite specific in what it calls "Old European Cut", and stones need to comply with a number of quantitative criteria regarding table and culet size, steepness of crown and style of pavilion cut, and while I haven't got the measurements with any level of precision your diamond looks a bit more "modern" than GIA's OEC definition would imply. It definitely isn't a modern cut, and many sellers would call it OEC!

If you are interested, here are some technical details - and more importantly photos to compare to your stone to: https://www.gia.edu/gia-news-research-round-brilliant-cut-diamond-pay (the video - although it's a CAD rendering - is quite good in my opinion at illustrating the differences).


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most appraisers I think would call that an Old European cut. I even think GIA would, but they're pretty particular. 

Your measurements would indicate about a 1.25ct. but using 2 measurements with 1 significant digit each leaves a lot of room for error.  Even a 0.1mm difference is important. 


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now