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Can I please get advice on if these are rough diamonds ? Or just ordinary rock please

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ID from a single (and poor quality - sorry) photo is impossible, but ID from photos is pretty much impossible even if you have many and excellent quality ones.

Take the stones to a qualified gemmologist, and you'll get an ID (or at least a ruling out of diamonds) very quickly and with high probability of being correct.

FWIW, based on the photo, I'd say you have a bunch of quartz pebbles, but I could be very wrong.

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Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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Like I don't wanna b rude in anyway but quartz have 6 points 2 them don't they?

I've counted most of them and they actually have 4 pints and doesnt quartz break 

Coincidally? Please don't think I'm trying 2 disreputable u in anyway I'm new 2 this 

But if u think lve said anything wrong jus let me know I'll happilly follow any advice that is decent 

 

 

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I don't want to be rude either, but you asked for an opinion. I've only been collecting minerals and gems for next to 50 years, and the first thing I said is that ID from photo is impossible, and the last is that my opinion is - and remains - that it is quartz, but I could be wrong.

Counting "points" (as you call them) is not a valid method for identifying anything, especially when it's clearly broken, abraded and/or polycrystalline/amorphous as the rocks in the picture. Conchoidal fracture (I assume that's what you wanted to say) is typical of quartz and many other minerals, including diamond. There are a couple of stones that show what could be conchoidal fractures (in a polycrystalline aggregate), but the fracture is not a distinguishing factor; the macro-aggregation of crystals is: diamonds don't tend to do it.

The only piece of advice I gave you is to go to a gemmologist with the samples. I have just repeated it.


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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Yep my bad did I honestly not put 6 I'm soooo sorry 

This is soo embarrassing of me (or should I say dumb)

Please 4give me ,jus goes 2 show clearly imma beginer

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No my apologies once again ,

And u r absolutely true 2 your words and

B4 I get carried away once again ,

I am truly thankful that u responded ,

Please believe this (even tho iT's a big ask)

Thankyou

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So sorry again ,

I shoulda adding this on the end of the last msg,

I am gonna follow your advice 100%

Believe it or not cause ,,I know your right 

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5 hours ago, davidelevi said:

I don't want to be rude either, but you asked for an opinion. I've only been collecting minerals and gems for next to 50 years, and the first thing I said is that ID from photo is impossible, and the last is that my opinion is - and remains - that it is quartz, but I could be wrong.

Counting "points" (as you call them) is not a valid method for identifying anything, especially when it's clearly broken, abraded and/or polycrystalline/amorphous as the rocks in the picture. Conchoidal fracture (I assume that's what you wanted to say) is typical of quartz and many other minerals, including diamond. There are a couple of stones that show what could be conchoidal fractures (in a polycrystalline aggregate), but the fracture is not a distinguishing factor; the macro-aggregation of crystals is: diamonds don't tend to do it.

The only piece of advice I gave you is to go to a gemmologist with the samples. I have just repeated it.

Thank u 4 your time and patience

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