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Opinions on this diamond


dcgear
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Hi everyone,

I am considering this diamond and would like to know your opinion! 
 

1.09carat 

color D 
VS2 

cut, symmetry, polish - excellent

L/W ratio - 1.01 

Florescence - Very Strong Blue 

 

It has a crystal inclusion on the table and I don’t have enough experience to tell if that will be eye clean.

Would like to get your thoughts on the proportions and the stone in general.

Thank you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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377ECF80-8517-4A28-801B-0E51424AC6E6.jpeg

E7643089-0C8B-4A0F-B2C7-7EB7A42A38C6.jpeg

F0D625D3-8873-4DE6-84D9-67909C83DEA5.jpeg

Edited by dcgear
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This is a very nice stone with a poorly placed imperfection.  Because is has been graded a VS2, the crystal is probably not visible with the naked eye but some people have better eyes than others and these stone videos are not good representations of what the stone will face up like.  I would try to see the stone in person before purchasing and would make sure there is a generous return policy (not store credit).

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Thanks for your response LaurentGeorge! I did read that for GIA graded VS2, you generally would not see the inclusions unless it was under 10x magnification however, I’ve read that in some cases it can still be seen by the naked eye. As you mentioned about some people having better eyes.


Is the rest of the diamond good enough otherwise that it would make up for the inclusions (based on the proportions will it provide good fire and brilliance?) or would you recommend that I should avoid and look for a different stone? 

 

Edited by dcgear
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The rest of the diamond looks perfectly fine. Very fine, actually. And as Laurent said, as long as the vendor has a good return policy, you are protected should you find that the inclusion is more visible than what you expect.

BTW - there is no impact on fire and brilliance from any VS2 inclusion; you need to get down to I1 or I2 (or some very unlucky SI2 with a lot of clouds) before you have any impact on that.

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1 hour ago, davidelevi said:

The rest of the diamond looks perfectly fine. Very fine, actually. And as Laurent said, as long as the vendor has a good return policy, you are protected should you find that the inclusion is more visible than what you expect.

BTW - there is no impact on fire and brilliance from any VS2 inclusion; you need to get down to I1 or I2 (or some very unlucky SI2 with a lot of clouds) before you have any impact on that.

Thanks for the input Davide, I forgot to mention that it has a florescence of very strong blue. Is this a concern? Could the D color plus the strong blue be a bad thing?   

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It's not a "bad" thing as long as you:

1. Know what you are buying and like the effect it has on the look of the diamond. Whether fluorescence bothers you (or your intended recipient) is totally a matter of personal opinion; some people like the "multiple personality" effect it causes; others really dislike it.

2. Note that this may (rarely, but it does happen) include the diamond turning hazy or oily-looking in sunlight. Easily tested for, and another good reason to make sure you have a solid return policy.

3. Accept that the discount that you are benefiting from because of the fluorescence will be turned into an even higher discount when reselling.

The colour itself has not much to do with this; however any blue tinge from fluorescence will be more easily visible the less "yellow" there is in the diamond to start with, so with a D you are going to see it quite easily (which is one of the reasons why higher colour diamond prices are generally more negatively impacted than lower down).

Edited by davidelevi
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Thanks for the response! How would I go about testing the haziness/oiliness in the sunlight? Is that something I can visually see or would I need a tool for it?

The Jeweler has a good return policy so I will have a chance to see in person but I won't have anything else to compare it to. 

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If it turns hazy, you will know!!!

Just get into sunlight - indirect sunlight is best because diamonds in direct sunlight become weapons: they reflect so much light you are blinded!

Here is a photo of a diamond showing modest haze:

The image “http://diamondsbylauren.com/images/06/01/202kvs1.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

it's an M colour, and it's perfectly transparent... until it meets UV light, when it turns purplish rather than yellow and it seems filled with smoke. It's also huge (3.05 ct, cut from a very flat stone so it faces up like a 5 carat).

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Thanks for the example. It actually looks quite interesting.

I called the jeweler and they told me they will do a report and have someone check it over. Then let me know if they observe any cloudiness/haze, in addition to seeing if the inclusion is eye clean before I decide to have it sent to me. 

They also told me that usually if any cloudiness is present it would be written in the comments of the GIA report?

 

Edited by dcgear
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7 hours ago, dcgear said:

if any cloudiness is present it would be written in the comments of the GIA report

That is completely incorrect. If there are cloud inclusions, those would be reported - but those are inclusions. Changes in appearance due to fluorescence are not reported at all; the only thing reported is the colour and strength of the fluorescence.

I may be reading too much into this, but the vendor's comments are not leading me to trusting them. The fact that they are having "someone checking it over" means they don't actually have the diamond in hand, therefore you are relying on third hand evidence, and the technical slip over haze is not... very inspiring, shall we say? Be careful, and make sure that whatever return policy they have told you they have is in writing, very clearly spelled out and with no ifs or buts.

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The slight bluish effect is to be expected; it's colourless under non-UV light, and strongly blue under UV light. Expose it to UV-rich illumination (i.e. unfiltered sunlight), and it's going to show some of that blue. Whether that bothers you is a completely different question.

In this thread there are some photos dealing with the topic of "what does fluorescence actually do to a diamond's looks". Far from a definitive answer, but they may give you an idea:

 

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