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mlm123

Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

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I'm a self educated Gemologist, meaning I read a bunch of internet articles and watched Youtube videos for a couple weeks :o. I found a ring that fit my fiancés style preferences and bought a ring on ebay. ( that fit my modest budget). The downer is the EGL USA cert, no GIA. Opinions on price, grading accuracy or issues with the stone or setting most welcome. I assume the E-F/VS1 grading is off a grade or 2, it is eye clean. I do have a 30 day return period with @ 3 weeks left.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/0-78-ct-14K-White-Gold-Emerald-Baguette-Cut-Diamond-Engagement-Ring-EGL-USA-/253568064839?_trksid=p2047675.m43663.l10137&nordt=true&rt=nc&orig_cvip=true

I took the pics with the black background, the remainder are from the ebay ad.

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Edited by mlm123
Added Picture

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Grading something via photos is not just difficult. It's impossible. The grading report's unreliability and lack of information (is the stone fluorescent?) doesn't help. In turn, this means it's impossible to say much about the price.

A setting like that one will probably cost you $800 or so, including setting work. Let's take it out, and you are left with $1,200 for the centre stone. You can get a GIA-graded 0.70 E/VS1 for $1,500 (or twice that price... depending on cut, fluorescence and finish), so it's definitely not a super-bargain.

Is it a rip-off? Well, that depends on what you have.

Playing the "EGL usually grades 1-2 grades loose" game gets you to a G-H/VS2, which means you could have probably bought "something" of the same size, colour and clarity new for the same price. Or you could have spent $500 more and guaranteed you got a really nicely cut stone (this one doesn't seem bad, but again it's difficult to say from still photos - nice ones, BTW, well done!).

Drawing the "EGL can be a total disaster, 6 grades off in colour and 3 in clarity" (and it can be) card leaves you in a bad place from an 'egg-on-your-face' point of view, but "only" $300 or so out-of-pocket compared to buying a new ring. Fortunately smaller stones aren't that sensitive to colour and clarity (both in terms of appearance and price).

So: if you like it, you probably didn't win the lottery, but you didn't lose badly either. If you don't like it, return it without fearing that it's a "never to be seen again opportunity".

Edited by davidelevi

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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2 hours ago, davidelevi said:

Grading something via photos is not just difficult. It's impossible. The grading report's unreliability and lack of information (is the stone fluorescent?) doesn't help. In turn, this means it's impossible to say much about the price.

A setting like that one will probably cost you $800 or so, including setting work. Let's take it out, and you are left with $1,200 for the centre stone. You can get a GIA-graded 0.70 E/VS1 for $1,500 (or twice that price... depending on cut, fluorescence and finish), so it's definitely not a super-bargain.

Is it a rip-off? Well, that depends on what you have.

Playing the "EGL usually grades 1-2 grades loose" game gets you to a G-H/VS2, which means you could have probably bought "something" of the same size, colour and clarity new for the same price. Or you could have spent $500 more and guaranteed you got a really nicely cut stone (this one doesn't seem bad, but again it's difficult to say from still photos - nice ones, BTW, well done!).

Drawing the "EGL can be a total disaster, 6 grades off in colour and 3 in clarity" (and it can be) card leaves you in a bad place from an 'egg-on-your-face' point of view, but "only" $300 or so out-of-pocket compared to buying a new ring. Fortunately smaller stones aren't that sensitive to colour and clarity (both in terms of appearance and price).

So: if you like it, you probably didn't win the lottery, but you didn't lose badly either. If you don't like it, return it without fearing that it's a "never to be seen again opportunity".

I appreciate you weighing in. I understand grading is impossible by looking at a few pics,  I figure expert eyes may be able to spot something problematic. I paid a bit less than the asking ($1830), if likely value is within a couple hundred bucks either way, I'm happy, as long as she likes it....

 Also curious as to the age, I'd love to hear opinions if someone recognizes the setting or design.

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The best way of getting a reliable estimate of "likely value" is to get an expert appraiser working for you to see it... my advice is worth more or less how much you pay for it, even though it is given in good faith. Ignore - totally - the "value" conclusion on the EGL piece of plastic; all it will do is to cause you to spend more money in insurance premiums.

The basic design of the setting is a very common style since at least the 1930s. Judging from the plated 14 kt gold and some fairly crude detailing (sorry), it's unlikely to be that old - but it could be 2 months, 2 years or 20 years old. Or more.

Edited by davidelevi

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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Age can’t be told from a photo either, and that general style has been around for decades. For what the the clue is worth, those egl cards are almost always done for large dealers and it’s usually done as part of the manufacturing process. They see ‘new’ things for that particular service. That one was done in 2017. 


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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Thanks for the feedback! I took your advice and visited a local appraiser. He graded the stone as G and clarity VS2. He mentioned the prongs look new and the diamond is well set, the crown and shank appear to be from the 40s or 50s. Looks like its been resized more than once ,  the shank is thin on the bottom. He suggested adding material to the lower shank to be safe.

I appreciate the advice. I think she'll love the ring, and I'm comfortable that I got a fair deal.

 

 

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