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Real or Fake?

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Impossible to say from that photo, sorry. On the other hand, the friendly jeweller on your high street should be able to tell you very quickly (and usually for free).

Happy New Year!


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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18 minutes ago, davidelevi said:

Impossible to say from that photo, sorry. On the other hand, the friendly jeweller on your high street should be able to tell you very quickly (and usually for free).

Happy New Year!

How could we tell it's fake? Is there a way to trace this as a non-expert?

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6 hours ago, Siyah said:

How could we tell it's fake? Is there a way to trace this as a non-expert?

Depending on what the "fake stone" is there may be several tell-tales. For example:

- Double instead of single refraction
- Wear on facet edges
- Polish/finish of the surface
- Inclusions and characteristics not typical of diamonds
- Refraction Index too low or too high
- Dispersion Index too low or too high
- Thermal and electrical conductivity (that's typically what the automated diamond tester tools check)
- Specific gravity (measurable only if the stone is loose)
- Hardness (not for the faint of heart - unless assessed through wear already on the stone)
- Materials and quality of setting (unlikely to find a diamond in Sterling silver, for example)

Some are pretty conclusive (at least as to "no diamond" if not to identification of what the stone actually is), others are indicative but can help building up a judgement. Many are built on expertise, and even the simplest ones (e.g. the first two) require to be shown some examples: this is how quartz or sapphire wears, and this is how diamond wears; this is what a doubly refracting crystal looks like, and this is what a singly refracting material looks like. Not necessarily turning you (or anyone) into an expert, but some basic gemmology training.

Speaking of which, if you are interested, take a look here: http://www.bwsmigel.info/ (not me or my site - but it's a good basic course and it's free!)

Edited by davidelevi
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Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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10 minutes ago, davidelevi said:

 

Depending on what the "fake stone" is there may be several tell-tales. For example:

- Double instead of single refraction
- Wear on facet edges
- Polish/finish of the surface
- Inclusions and characteristics not typical of diamonds
- Refraction Index too low or too high
- Dispersion Index too low or too high
- Thermal and electrical conductivity (that's typically what the automated diamond tester tools check)
- Specific gravity (measurable only if the stone is loose)
- Hardness (not for the faint of heart - unless assessed through wear already on the stone)
- Materials and quality of setting (unlikely to find a diamond in Sterling silver, for example)

Some are pretty conclusive (at least as to "no diamond" if not to identification of what the stone actually is), others are indicative but can help building up a judgement. Many are built on expertise, and even the simplest ones (e.g. the first two) require to be shown some examples: this is how quartz or sapphire wears, and this is how diamond wears; this is what a doubly refracting crystal looks like, and this is what a singly refracting material looks like. Not necessarily turning you (or anyone) into an expert, but some basic gemmology training.

Speaking of which, if you are interested, take a look here: http://www.bwsmigel.info/ (not me or my site - but it's a good basic course and it's free!)

None of them are actually easy and quickly to be done when you are in a shop. Especially if you are a non-expert.

Thanks anyway, as this enlightens me!

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Actually, most of these are very easily and quickly done in a shop - you only need a loupe and 30 seconds or less. But it does require some expertise. 😉

@SiyahDon't be disheartened - chances of being given a fake are low as long as one is sensible (i.e.a 5 carat D/IF for $5,000 is just a way of separating a fool and his/her money). As to the rest, a good diamond is a diamond that you like.

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Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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On 12/30/2018 at 2:37 AM, Siyah said:

How could we tell it's fake? Is there a way to trace this as a non-expert?

The easiest and most common way as a non-expert is to ask an expert. In most cases, a stone can be identified as diamond or non-diamond in under a minute and the service is free although the gemologist may take the opportunity to sell you other services like grading or valuation.  

How do you know when you're in a shop?

1) Only shop in places where you otherwise trust the merchant.

2) Only shop in places where you have a 100% return right for some reasonable amount of time (say a week).

3) Use a credit card.

4) If the price is part of the question, and it usually is, consider hiring an independent appraiser to evaluate your purchase in addition to identifying it as a diamond.

How do you know when the merchant won't let you do the above?  Easy.  Don't buy there unless the price is so low that it doesn't matter. 

FWIW, I recommend the above procedure even if you ARE an expert. I"m reminded of the saying that a person who is his own attorney has a fool for a lawyer. Throwing serious money at a merchant you don't trust based on tests that you don't understand is, well, foolish. 

Edited by denverappraiser
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Neil Beaty

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There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

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