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Jaipur Gemological Lab


tfen
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Hi All, 

 

I am looking at a diamond that has a certificate from the Jaipur Gemological Lab, confident the stone is real and close to that described on the certificate however I can't find any info around people's experiences of this certificate or its validity. Has anyone had experience with JGL or can anyone comment on the validity of these certificates? 

 

Thanks, Tom.

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Anyone can set up a gem lab - no qualifications or even experience required, so the default answer is "don't trust unless you have a clear reason to". Even if you trust your grading skills to assess colour and clarity (and cut?), there are treatments that are not readily detectable just with a loupe and that influence the fair value of the stone.

 

To be honest, since a GIA report costs a few tens of dollars, this tells you more about the vendor than it does about the stone. Unless the stone itself goes is priced a few hundreds (e.g. irradiated "black" diamonds) - in which case no report is basically fine.

Edited by davidelevi
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I'm with the above.  The onus is on the 'lab' to convince you that their opinions have merit.  The default answer isn't just no, it's hell no. Any  I would take it even further.  If you find the lab to be unworthy of your trust, don't just hold it against the lab, hold it against the person who is asking you to rely on them. 

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Thanks for the feed back. To me the certificate looks pretty dodgy, and like it could easily be fabricated (if you'd bother fabricating a certificate from this lab). For the area I'm in I can appreciate that the certificates may be more difficult to attain. I would be happy enough to take a gamble on a diamond without a certificate, the annoying thing is they want a higher price for the certificates and these probably aren't worth the paper they're printed on. 

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Bear in mind that the price of the report is a few tens of dollars, no matter who makes it. GIA publishes its price schedule (https://www.gia.edu/gem-lab-service/diamond-grading there is a button called "fee schedule" down the page), and it's among the most expensive labs.

 

The reason why graded diamonds (and diamonds grade by good labs in particular) "cost more" has nothing to do with the report - it's the gemmological properties of the diamond that make it worth more.

 

Why do you think that in your area reports may be difficult to obtain? Where do you live? GIA has labs in Thailand, India, Hong-Kong, Botswana, South Africa and Israel as well as the US. This covers effectively many major production or cutting locations, and for the others shipping diamonds is safe, quick and cheap. There really is little excuse other than the fact that the choice of lab is not random, and it's intended to maximise the return to the seller.

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  • 9 months later...

Same response as above: 

On 07/06/2017 at 10:56 AM, davidelevi said:

Anyone can set up a gem lab - no qualifications or even experience required, so the default answer is "don't trust unless you have a clear reason to". Even if you trust your grading skills to assess colour and clarity (and cut?), there are treatments that are not readily detectable just with a loupe and that influence the fair value of the stone.

To be honest, since a GIA report costs a few tens of dollars, this tells you more about the vendor than it does about the stone. Unless the stone itself goes is priced a few hundreds (e.g. irradiated "black" diamonds) - in which case no report is basically fine.

 

On 07/06/2017 at 4:55 PM, LaurentGeorge said:

I have never heard of them.  As Davide says, anyone can set up a gem lab.  GIA has offices in Mumbai so your jeweler cannot use the excuse that it costs too much to export for certification, assuming you are in India.

 

On 07/06/2017 at 8:53 PM, denverappraiser said:

I'm with the above.  The onus is on the 'lab' to convince you that their opinions have merit.  The default answer isn't just no, it's hell no. Any  I would take it even further.  If you find the lab to be unworthy of your trust, don't just hold it against the lab, hold it against the person who is asking you to rely on them. 

 

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