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Need Opinion Antique Rock


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Hi Walter, welcome to Diamond Review!

 

I can guess a few things from the photos:

 

It's Russian, probably dating to just before the first World War (1910-1915). At least a part of the frame is 14 kt gold (the "56" mark without a woman's head is the 1908-1918 Russian mark for 14 kt), the rest could be silver (quite usual for setting diamonds in the period), or it could all be in gold.

 

The maker's marks are too confused for me to make them out, but the design/quality of manufacturing is not screaming "Fabergé", and that would be the only thing that makes a significant difference.

 

I think it's likely that the stones are diamonds, but a direct inspection is required to be certain of that - and of their actual size, colour and clarity. If they are diamonds, the central stone and the 6 larger ones may be worth a fair amount of money on their own.

 

It's definitely worth cleaning this properly and finding an expert (preferably NOT someone who trades in jewellery) to tell you more about it. This will also help you figure out what 's the best way to sell it: as a finished jewel (it is pretty, and brooches are fashionable this year), or by unsetting the stones and scrapping the metal, and who to sell to.

 

With the information available it's impossible to even guess as to what price you could get - partly because it depends on how you are going to sell, but mostly because we don't know what you have (diamonds or not? how large? what colour? etc.).

 

Hope this helps. If posting in German makes it easier for you, feel free to do so, I can read and understand it (and translate your post into English for other readers to comment), but it's best if I don't write... (Ich spreche Peinlisch - das ist peinlich Deutsch)

Edited by davidelevi
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Hi Walter, welcome to Diamond Review!

 

I can guess a few things from the photos:

 

It's Russian, probably dating to just before the first World War (1910-1915). At least a part of the frame is 14 kt gold (the "56" mark without a woman's head is the 1908-1918 Russian mark for 14 kt), the rest could be silver (quite usual for setting diamonds in the period), or it could all be in gold.

 

The maker's marks are too confused for me to make them out, but the design/quality of manufacturing is not screaming "Fabergé", and that would be the only thing that makes a significant difference.

 

I think it's likely that the stones are diamonds, but a direct inspection is required to be certain of that - and of their actual size, colour and clarity. If they are diamonds, the central stone and the 6 larger ones may be worth a fair amount of money on their own.

 

It's definitely worth cleaning this properly and finding an expert (preferably NOT someone who trades in jewellery) to tell you more about it. This will also help you figure out what 's the best way to sell it: as a finished jewel (it is pretty, and brooches are fashionable this year), or by unsetting the stones and scrapping the metal, and who to sell to.

 

With the information available it's impossible to even guess as to what price you could get - partly because it depends on how you are going to sell, but mostly because we don't know what you have (diamonds or not? how large? what colour? etc.).

 

Hope this helps. If posting in German makes it easier for you, feel free to do so, I can read and understand it (and translate your post into English for other readers to comment), but it's best if I don't write... (Ich spreche Peinlisch - das ist peinlich Deutsch)

Thank you very much.

I had the Experience to show this Thing to Jeweler, and he said that it's true stone. He was very interested in this thing.

He said that it's only for dismantle. He immediately offered to buy it.

I thought that there is something wrong, so appealed to you.

Оn the Needle is brand:  like "R" but to  another Side and something else, and a Crown or Tiara. 

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Be very wary of anyone who offers to buy the thing from you... especially if you didn't ask them for a bid!

 

That's why I'm saying that preferably the expert who comes up with the valuation should not be someone who directly trades in jewellery: the temptation to say "it's worth 500" because they can make a killing reselling it for 5,000 (or 50,000) can be very strong.

 

Do you have any of the large auction houses (Christie's, Sotheby's, Bonham's) nearby? They tend to provide more reliable estimates, though they are known to "get it wrong" quite a few times, but at least their interest is in getting a high price, since they live off the % commission. Note: I'm not recommending you sell through them; I'm just suggesting them as a possible source of expertise that is likely to be less biased than a jeweller who buys and sells these things. 

 

The reverse R is probably the Cyrillic letter Ð¯, which is called (and pronounced) ya, as for example in Yakov ("Яков"). The "something else" is probably another letter; normally there is a small dot (•) between the two letters. They are the initials of the maker OR of the assayer (the person who tested the metal's purity). The crown or tiara is likely the city mark - unfortunately, several cities used a crown or tiara (or something that could look like either one especially if badly struck or worn out).

 

Identifying marks is hard enough when they are well known and one can see them directly through a loupe... and I'm far from being an expert on Russian marks. In any case, the mark won't make a difference to value/price unless it's Fabergé or related masters, none of which had a Ð¯ initial. They do make good marketing material, though, so by any means keep researching what is marked!

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