Jump to content

Are Computers Destroying The Jewelry Industry


blingonme
 Share

Recommended Posts

Now I myself am an old fashioned guy so maybe I'm being bias here . . . However, is it really possible to get  a proper design actually made in this machine called the '3d Printer'.  Looks like they are breaking the basic business rules. I mean what's next? Firing my employees?They do offer this special 'jewellery' filament. Which can make things in gold or silver. Hopefully I'll have my invoice for it.

https://www.ordsolutions.com/hips/

Does anyone here have knowledge on this.

 

 

Looks great but I just recently started teaching my son about the skills and dexterity that is required to make even a 'pre-design' for a simple engagement ring. Heck I would even love to make my own digital multitrack recorder. Has anyone here heard of this '3d printing' jewelry design or music instrument making machines? Love to use this technology for movie makeup or making film-related jewelry. I think actors would just love them.

Edited by blingonme
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, why not. It's just building the ring (or whatever) layer by layer. Imagine you are slicing the ring in a thousand (or a million) very thin slices, and then putting them on top of each other in the right sequence, and bonding them to each other. On joining the thousandth (or millionth) slice, your get your ring back.

 

Hand making is both easier and harder. It takes a lot of knowledge and technology (possibly including other 3D printers) to make a 3D printer. However the execution is then very easy. To make a file, a ring mandrel, a hammer and a torch is a lot easier than to make a 3D printer, but the execution of the job then requires much more skill and experience. If you want to step even further back, older soldering techniques (e.g. copper salt soldering) require even less sophisticated tools than a modern oxy-acetilene torch (just a flame and a glass pipe), but they tend to require even more skill and knowledge in using them correctly.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, why not. It's just building the ring (or whatever) layer by layer. Imagine you are slicing the ring in a thousand (or a million) very thin slices, and then putting them on top of each other in the right sequence, and bonding them to each other. On joining the thousandth (or millionth) slice, your get your ring back.

 

Hand making is both easier and harder. It takes a lot of knowledge and technology (possibly including other 3D printers) to make a 3D printer. However the execution is then very easy. To make a file, a ring mandrel, a hammer and a torch is a lot easier than to make a 3D printer, but the execution of the job then requires much more skill and experience. If you want to step even further back, older soldering techniques (e.g. copper salt soldering) require even less sophisticated tools than a modern oxy-acetilene torch (just a flame and a glass pipe), but they tend to require even more skill and knowledge in using them correctly.

I couldn't agree with you more sir. Thanks for sharing. Now I don't feel like I'm getting old or anything. Somethings are just best left the way they are. Hehe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 3d printer is printing the 'wax', which then needs to be cast, finished and set.  What's so revolutionary about that?  They've been doing it for decades.  CAD designs are the reason we see so many 'halo' rings now.  I'm a bit tired of the look, but I think it's a stretch to call it destroying the jewelry industry.  Mass market jewelry shows a lot less imagination now, and I think CAD is partially responsible, but maybe it's just because the young 'uns don't have art class in school anymore.  They wouldn't know good art if it bit them in the tucas.  Then again, I AM old, and proud of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 3d printer is printing the 'wax', which then needs to be cast, finished and set.  What's so revolutionary about that?  They've been doing it for decades.  CAD designs are the reason we see so many 'halo' rings now.  I'm a bit tired of the look, but I think it's a stretch to call it destroying the jewelry industry.  Mass market jewelry shows a lot less imagination now, and I think CAD is partially responsible, but maybe it's just because the young 'uns don't have art class in school anymore.  They wouldn't know good art if it bit them in the tucas.  Then again, I AM old, and proud of it.

Hey mate - I think he's talking about direct metal 3d printing - - these build the item layer by layer through melting and solidifying the precious metal powder using a focused laser beam. I was looking at one when they first came out at the end of 2014- - but for what they're asking, I might wait until economy of scale kicks in... ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The link is to an ad for a guy making waxes (not that I have any particular problem with that by the way).

 

http://formlabs.com/applications/jewelry/isaacs-fine-jewelry/

Sorry denverappraiser you're right - - - I wasn't talking about the little 3d desktop models that only make a wax - blingonme, I reckon this could possibly be the future...

http://www.cooksongold-emanufacturing.com/products-precious-m080.php

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The link is to an ad for a guy making waxes (not that I have any particular problem with that by the way).

 

http://formlabs.com/applications/jewelry/isaacs-fine-jewelry/

Sorry denverappraiser you're right - - - I wasn't talking about the little 3d desktop models that only make a wax - blingonme, I reckon this could possibly be the future...

http://www.cooksongold-emanufacturing.com/products-precious-m080.php

 

Right on guys. Thanks for sharing! The future looks exciting indeed :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I firmly believe that machines are not a threat to the jewelry industry and even other industries that require the design and imagination of a human being in order to create a unique piece of art. However, it is evident that as we become more digitally advanced, no one really cares much for true art anymore. So that is another thing to worry about for the future of humanity itself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

It does seem like they are just making the cast. Which means they are only saving on the hand-design process. I don't see how it's destroying the industry... it may cause some circulation as us older folks get replaced by more people who do computer design instead of hand-crafting the jewelry. And even then some refinements would have to be made. Doesn't look like it's ready to do stone-setting automatically either.

I'm sure there is a lot of skill needed for making a good 3D model of a ring, it will create a different distinction between teh very skilled and the amateurs. I'm intrigued to see these technologies unfold into the business. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Perhaps. However they can also cause loss of skills and - at least in the short term - of jobs in the industry, plus they are significantly more complex to make and maintain than traditional jewellery-making tools. I'm not sure it's quite as simple as you seem to see it.

Edited by davidelevi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Trades in general, and jewelry in particular, are suffering.  The traditional talents for a bench jeweler take a LOT of practice to develop.  Decades.  The same holds for most trades from cobblers to wheelwrights.  All are having trouble.  Automated manufacturing reduces this, which brings down prices and, at least at the bottom, brings up quality, but it has the opposite effect at the top.  No one develops the skills.  When I see museum pieces by the likes of Bulgari or Cartier, I’m just in awe.  It’s not just that the people who made these things were fantastically skilled, they had a fantastic amount of practice to get there.  They had made 100 things like it before they made that one.  They worked at the knee of a predecessor who made things like it. Every time they got better.  CAD has broken this cycle.  The people with the ‘old school’ talents are getting old and retiring, and the young aren’t learning from them because they lack the incentive, they lack the opportunity, and they lack the clients.

Edited by denverappraiser
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

 

We always look for something that is much better, something more interesting, any easy way to get it done soon and with more perfection. And so the innovation takes place. 3-D printer is an aspiring example of that.
 
It's not to blame the technology that liberates us with an option. It is to blame to the users who made it for a limited purpose.
 

New innovations are the inevitable part of our society. We can't stop them. Whereas, we can find the new and interesting ways to utilize them at it's best. 

To get more visit to [spam link removed]

Whereas old innovations are?

 

It does seem that you are right about one thing: we can't stop spammers, But we can report them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
  • Create New...