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Dropshipping Diamonds?


Sam A. Missoum
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Blue Nile built itself on the basis of a drop-shipping model, and it is AFAIK the largest. Plenty of others - from James Allen to B2C to Enchanted Diamonds - use either a pure drop-shipping model or a combination of drop-shipping and traditional shop-based retail (e.g. Union Diamonds, Solomon Brothers), or "augmented drop-shipping" where most or even all stones are called in and inspected prior to shipping to the consumer (e.g. Excel Diamonds, Diamond Ideals) but with a cost structure and price levels that are similar to those of pure drop-shippers.

 

Why the question, if I may ask? If anything, the jewellers owning most of their stock and/or calling in all stones are a minority nowadays...

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Thank you so much David!

 

You said "Why the question"...is that rhetorical or are you actually asking me why I asked? I was a bit confused :P 

 

Does anyone know of Richard Cannon and their legitimacy, etc?

 

I definitely would love to be in touch with someone in Ramat Gan, Israel if anyone knows which I am guessing is a stupid question to ask here, ha!

 

Thanks in advance. 

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I was actually asking why you asked, since as I mentioned most online dealers are (to some extent) drop-shipping.

 

I have never heard of Richard Cannon - which means nothing one way or the other.

 

Re: Ramat Gan - bear in mind that you will not get any lower prices in Israel than anywhere else in the world. The difference may be the cost of shipping, and that's insignificant on a typical diamond (and the vast majority of diamonds are cut in India nowadays, in any case).

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I would like to buy from a dropshipper, a reputable one.

True drop shipping means a shipment from a 3rd party and where there has been no inspection at all of the merchandise by the seller. Most people count this as a problem, not a feature.  That said, I've never heard of Richard Cannon either. I see nothing on their website that is specifically a big problem but, I must admit, I'm not especially impressed either.  I only gave it a 30-second perusal so it's entirely possible I missed some things, both good and bad.  Yelp reviewers seem to be pretty happy with their store. 

 

Their selling proposition seems to be a willingness to include 3rd party sales commission sales sites between them and the buyer so that the final buyer doesn't know who they're really shopping with.   This is decently common in some other industries and a modified version of it is typical with diamonds, but usually with diamonds the retailer is doing SOMETHING to earn their money beyond putting up a website.  I can see why dealers might like this but I'm hard pressed to think of why anyone as a consumer would want to be involved.  No, I don't know any other jewelers who offer it.  There are some large wholesale jewelry supply houses, like Stuller.com, that come close in that they'll do all of the back room sort of work for a jeweler, but I'm pretty sure the jeweler still has to receive and inspect the merchandise first, before it gets shipped to you. 

 

I can't imagine US customs would stand for a pure dropship arrangement involving international shipping even if, for some reason, a customer would count it as desirable.  The risks are far too high on both sides of the deal.

 

Here's Cannon's site for the benefit of anyone else reading and who wants to look at it.

 

http://www.rcjewelry.com

 

 

Edited by denverappraiser
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I would like to buy from a dropshipper, a reputable one.

 

Their selling proposition seems to be a willingness to include 3rd party sales commission sales sites between them and the buyer so that the final buyer doesn't know who they're really shopping with.   This is decently common in some other industries and a modified version of it is typical with diamonds, but usually with diamonds the retailer is doing SOMETHING to earn their money beyond putting up a website.  I can see why dealers might like this but I'm hard pressed to think of why anyone as a consumer would want to be involved.  No, I don't know any other jewelers who offer it.  There are some large wholesale jewelry supply houses, like Stuller.com, that come close in that they'll do all of the back room sort of work for a jeweler, but I'm pretty sure the jeweler still has to receive and inspect the merchandise first, before it gets shipped to you. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you so much Denver! :) 

 

I am right down the mountain from you here in Tulsa, Oklahoma! Ha!

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Blue Nile built itself on the basis of a drop-shipping model, and it is AFAIK the largest. Plenty of others - from James Allen to B2C to Enchanted Diamonds - use either a pure drop-shipping model or a combination of drop-shipping and traditional shop-based retail (e.g. Union Diamonds, Solomon Brothers), or "augmented drop-shipping" where most or even all stones are called in and inspected prior to shipping to the consumer (e.g. Excel Diamonds, Diamond Ideals) but with a cost structure and price levels that are similar to those of pure drop-shippers.

 

Why the question, if I may ask? If anything, the jewellers owning most of their stock and/or calling in all stones are a minority nowadays...

 

Davide is completely correct, but - in the interest of clarity - I do want to make certain everyone understands the concept of "Drop-Shipping" is that diamonds are ordered, then immediately packaged and shipped.  Other online retailers (like B2C - since we were mentioned) are careful to have an in-house gemologist inspect the diamond before it is shipped.  This is to catch any haziness due to fluorescence, inclusions that prevent the diamond from being eye-clean, unexpected tint, chips or damage, etc... These companies do this for quality control and because it is far better to catch unexpected surprises before the item is shipped than to have an unhappy customer have to go through the return process.

 

Again - as Davide said - there are several different models and he lists a number of reputable online dealers.

 

Also to be considered are the 'value added' services an internet provider (drop-shipper or not) may offer.  Hassle-free returns, future upgrades, warranties and shipping processes are just a few of the things to consider when debating which dealer to use.

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