Got Diamond Questions?
Our community of diamond experts are here to provide answers
Sign in to follow this  
Devon047

"i" Color On A 2.07 Carat Princess Cut?

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

 

I've read a lot of the posts on color and seems like there are different opinions on how low you should go in color.  Especially with a larger stone.  Some people say "G", while others say "I".  I wanted to reach out to everyone here and get their opinion.  I want a stone that is going to look cold/white and not "warm" or "yellowish".

 

The stone will be set in a white gold halo setting.

 

I'm considering the following stones:

 

Stone #1:

 

Price - $12,820

Carat - 2.07

Clarity - VVS2

Color - I (this is my concern with this stone.)

Table - 68%

Depth - 72.4%

Girdle - Med / Thick

Polish - Ex

Sym - VG

Flour - None

 

 

Stone #2:

 

Price - $13,340

Carat - 2.01

Clarity - VS1

Color - H

Table - 72%

Depth - 74.2%

Girdle - Thick / Very Thick

Polish - Ex

Sym - VG

Flour - Faint

 

Thoughts???  Thanks!!!!

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this carat range do not go below a "G" color for halo style settings.

  • Like 1

Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People's sensitivity varies but if you are setting this stone in a halo, either go with the whiter stone or make sure that the jeweler creating your ring uses slightly darker side stones.  The last thing you want is for the halo to accentuate the darkness of the center. 

You should go to your local jeweler and ask to look at both H and I color stones in various lighting situations.  This is the only way to determine how sensitive you might be to color.

Regardless of your choice, just make sure the halo stones are picked to match.


Laurent George
Diamond Ideals
New York City

www.diamondideals.com
212-207-4845
laurent@diamondideals.com

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Laurent.  That's a good point I didn't consider!!!!  The halo setting says it has G-H stones.  So, going with the "I" may make accent the darker color of the center stone...  I did look at some stones locally and some I could see the color in and others not...  I'm more concerned with her being able to see the color than myself..  Maybe the "H" is the safer option.

 

Do you see any "red flags" from the specs on that stone?

 

Thanks!!!!!!!!!

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most welcome, good luck.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be helpful to know the dimensions on the two stones as the girdle on #2 is thick to very thick.  

 

Regarding color, in a princess of this size the most color revealing view is going to be from the side profile.  Since the halo will obscure that view you have more flexibility with the color grade.  But if you are sensitive, even without being able to see it from the side, it will be safer to go higher than I color.


Bryan Boyne, GG (GIA), CG (AGS)
Whiteflash Ideal Diamonds and Fine Jewelry

bboyne@whiteflash.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Texas Leaguer!  So, it sounds like a halo setting where the stone is set lower in the halo (classic halo) would be better than one where the stone sits higher (floating halo) so you won't be able to see the side as much.  Do you agree?  Also, I was told strong fluorescence could make the stone look whiter (given that the fluorescence doesn't make the stone "milky").  Thanks again!!!!  Chris  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In most instances, fluorescence will have no impact on the colour: there is simply not enough UV in the lighting to activate the fluorescence. The exception is unfiltered sunlight (or being very close to most fluorescent light sources - but this is not a likely "day-to-day" set up)

Edited by davidelevi

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Davide.  Be cautious of claims touting the benefits of fluorescence.  The stones are cheaper to buy but come with some other issues.

 

Regarding setting the stone higher or lower in the halo, yes, the higher it is set the more body color will be seen in a diamond with lower color.  But if you go with H or higher I don't think you will have a problem with color.  You should set the stone however it looks best in the given setting as opposed to setting it low just to conceal color.


Bryan Boyne, GG (GIA), CG (AGS)
Whiteflash Ideal Diamonds and Fine Jewelry

bboyne@whiteflash.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 99.5% of cases, strong fluorescence is a non factor on a diamonds face up color and transparency, according to the results of a well done study done by GIA back in 1997.

 

Read it here:

 

http://www.gia.edu/gems-gemology/winter-1997-fluorescence-diamonds-moses


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually the article you refer to specifically says: "In general, the results revealed that strongly blue fluorescent diamonds were perceived to have a better color appearance when viewed table-up, with no discernible trend table-down."

 

We have found this to be true for both strong and sometimes even medium fluorescent stones in that they tend to appear more white than stones of the same color with no fluorescence.  Color and transparency are two different things.

 

This is one place I respectfully disagree with my learned colleagues.

Edited by LaurentGeorge

Laurent George
Diamond Ideals
New York City

www.diamondideals.com
212-207-4845
laurent@diamondideals.com

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The article itself addressed both color and transparency.

 

Color was visually perceived to be a bit higher in the lower color grades.

 

Transparency was not negatively affected by strong fluorescence, i.e.; oily, hazy, milky.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps if you are viewing them at your desk within a short distance from your fluorescent desk lamp.  But in normal viewing environments the UV is of insufficient intensity to activate the fluoro effect.

 

No disrespect to GIA but their study seemed more designed to help the diamond industry by attempting to counter some negative attitudes towards fluorescence.  Ironically, their own photos show evidence of overgrading for color which is a significant reason for negative attitudes and deep discounts among the trade.


Bryan Boyne, GG (GIA), CG (AGS)
Whiteflash Ideal Diamonds and Fine Jewelry

bboyne@whiteflash.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only noticeable visual of fluorescence in our experience has been in diamonds that have very strong blue.

 

Of interest is that even tradespeople were not able to pick strong blue in this GIA study.


Barry
www.exceldiamonds.com
@Exceldiamonds on Twitter

Excel Diamonds on Facebook

sales@exceldiamonds.com
1-866-829-8600
1-212-921-0635

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this