davidelevi

A-List Jeweler
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Everything posted by davidelevi

  1. davidelevi

    Si2 diamond

    Hi Steph, welcome to Diamond Review! It is quite normal for an SI2 diamond to have inclusions that are visible without magnification. As to price, without knowing a lot more it's very difficult to give even a rough opinion. To start with, "it cost 13,500" in what unit of currency? USD? CAD? EUR? GBP? SGD? Where was it purchased? (a known luxury retailer like Cartier or Tiffany will have prices that are significantly higher than a "common" high street jeweller, and that in turn will be more expensive than an internet-based dealer) Did the centre diamond come with a lab report? By which lab? What else did the lab say - precise weight and colour? Fluorescence? Finish (symmetry and polish)? A stone weighing 0.98 ct is going to be priced significantly less than one that is 1.02 ct, but both could be described as "a 1 carat stone" (they shouldn't, but that's another matter). Is the cut a proprietary cut, or was it just defined as "cushion"? What about the ring? Does it have a brand name? In which material is it?
  2. davidelevi

    Is A Cavity In Diamond Acceptable?

    Sorry for the slow answer; I think I'm 4 or 5 hours ahead of you, and I went to sleep before you responded (I guess you are from Quebec?) Bear in mind that a "real" answer to most of these questions requires actually seeing the stone, however we have some indirect clues: 1. It's likely to be very small. I could not see it on the plot, until I realised that what I thought was another "indented natural" sign was actually the cavity with a single cross-hatch line. A GIA plot is not technically "to scale", but they do try to represent relative sizes. 2. Observed clarity: considering location, and the fact that GIA placed it fourth on its list of characteristics, I think it's very unlikely you'd see it without a loupe; depending on the setting and how high the stone seat comes, you may not be able to see it at all once it's set. 3. Integrity - see my answer to the first post on this thread. Honestly - don't worry. 4. It's on the pavilion (bottom) of the diamond. It's protected by a mm of the hardest natural substance known... Also, unless you have a 5 (or more) prong setting it won't work mechanically to have a prong there: you need one (or 2) on the point, and 2 behind the bulge for the stone to sit securely; the cavity is in front of the bulge. Extra pairs of prongs can be set more or less where one likes, but unless you like the look there is really no reason to have them - the stone is big enough to "carry" them visually, but it is overkill mechanically if the seat is fashioned properly. I'd worry more about protecting the point of the stone!
  3. davidelevi

    Is A Cavity In Diamond Acceptable?

    It's very close to the girdle...but below it, so I wouldn't worry about covering it with a prong - it will be hidden by the rest of the diamond. Most likely it would be not in a good place for a prong anyway, unless you have a setting with at least 5 prongs (it is a large stone!)
  4. davidelevi

    Is A Cavity In Diamond Acceptable?

    Hi André! The GIA site seems to be down. I'll keep checking and hopefully at some point before Monday it will be up.
  5. davidelevi

    Thoughts please

    You'll end up with a Type IIa - D if you continue this way... 😁 I realise that it is difficult with lockdown only about being released, but the only way to solve this is for you to see things; photos and videos only go so far. A really well cut I will look very white, in isolation
  6. davidelevi

    Thoughts please

    I find it less attractive (in the video and on paper) than the I-colour you were looking at a couple of days ago. YMMV.
  7. davidelevi

    PLEASE HELP!! Final choice!!!!!

    You are very welcome! Good luck with the choice, and congratulations for what will ensue!
  8. davidelevi

    PLEASE HELP!! Final choice!!!!!

    Couple of points - I think I have already given you feedback on all of these stones, so I'm not going to repeat this, but I'll focus on a couple of technical aspects: 1. Cut grades No such thing. That's Blue Nile's marketing categorisation which means "I want to sell you this diamond". If what you are using to determine "AGS" cut grades are the plots on the HCA app, then these are no longer relevant; AGS have changed their grading system at least twice since those tables were published, and the current AGS grading system is quite different from having a single set of parameters and measuring "distance" from those. 2. Clarity and effect on transparency No they would not. There are (relatively rare) SI2 diamonds where the clarity grading is due to clouds or wisps - not simply "there is a cloud in this diamond" - where the overall transparency of the stone is compromised. The call on transparency is one you need to make with your own eyes (or at the very least photos and video) - no lab grades it, even in the extreme case of (I1), I2 or I3 diamonds, where the inclusions are deemed so prominent that they may affect transparency and brilliance - note the "may" rather than "do". And I have seen plenty of I1 diamonds where the inclusions do not affect transparency or brilliance, even though they are obvious to see, at times even with the naked eye. 3. Colour grading I think what we are seeing is not so much a change in background, but in camera equipment and (especially) white balance setting. Which is why judging colour from photos is generally a thankless task, and judging colour from photos taken by unknown photographers using unknown equipment set up in an unknown environment and configured with unknown settings and post-processing is an impossible task. It is so variable on the individual observing and the circumstances that it is impossible to answer this in a certain way. Generally speaking, J-K is where people start noticing warmth in a significant way. However, a really well cut J-colour diamond can still look white "on its own", and platinum is more forgiving in this respect than rhodium (but less forgiving than unplated white gold). It all depends on what you want to "buy insurance for". Of these 3, ignoring price, my recommendation is to go with the 1.06 I. It's better cut than the other 2, it is clearly the least tinted and even though the inclusions may be easier to see they are not (to my eye and in as far as it can be seen in the video) unpleasant even though the main one is reflected 8 times! Whether the extra cash outlay is burdensome, only you can judge.
  9. davidelevi

    SI1 diamonds, surface graining and cloud comments

    The general amount of "stuff". Twinning wisps are wispy, but when there's a lot of them there is potential to see something from an angle or another. In particular, I thought the wisp that ends on the facet at 10 o'clock (or its reflection at 4 o'clock - or is it the original? This is why a video is not good...) was quite visible - then again, it's 20-25x and the stone is loose. Once set, everything will be less visible (usually).
  10. davidelevi

    SI1 diamonds, surface graining and cloud comments

    Both the H are nicely cut, at least as nicely as the J; I prefer the 1.15, which has more contrast (which I like); the 1.09 and the J are more uniformly bright. Other people may prefer that. The 1.15 is also the one that has more potential to be not eye-clean. However this is not something that can be determined reliably via a video or photo: you (and ideally it has to be you, not someone else) have to see the diamond. Sometimes GIA does not plot all internal characteristics because they are so diffused (or there are so many) that they would mess up the plot - the purpose of the plot is to allow identification of the stone, not that of providing indications on transparency or visibility of inclusions to the naked eye. Neither H seem to have cloudiness or haziness issues in as far as it can be seen in a video - again not the ideal way of looking for these things. My guess is that either H will be just on the border of OK for clarity and transparency. The J is cleaner, but it's definitely going to look a bit more tinted when compared. Again, whether you see it and in which conditions is very much an individual thing. Of the 3, given a good return policy (which BN has), I would bet on the 1.15 being the nicest overall stone. YMMV.
  11. You are most welcome. Do come back to tell us if you (both) are happy or not once you get the knot tied with a knot (OK, I know, I'm a dad, and that's a dad joke).
  12. All look good "on paper". Or at least good enough and similar enough that I don't think you can discard them based on the report info. There's $600 price spread - not sure whether that makes a difference for you (and I don't know how it compares to the "reference" stone, but I'll assume it was in this range). I'll ignore it in what follows, which is my purely subjective opinion - other people may come to completely different conclusions. The only one I would discard immediately is the one ending in 792. It may be eye-clean, but at some point the schmutz right in the middle of the table is going to trouble me. Kind-of-similar but much less so for 970, which has also got one of the least symmetrical and badly contrasted patterns (the overall amount of contrast is fine; I just don't like the pattern). Second one out for me. 745: it looks foggy, even though it has the highest clarity of all. Maybe the camera was out of focus? Nice pattern, though. Also, a bit of a thick girdle makes it smaller than it could be - however the price is not high considering it's a VVS in a bunch of VS (and some marginal ones at that!). It also seems one of the more strongly tinted (within them all being "I") - but again it could be the camera: don't set white balance for a while, and you can get much worse... with the same object! 621 also looks foggy. Same observations (minus the price!) as for 745, so it may be the camera for these two, if they are from the same wholesaler (JA does not own the diamonds). This leaves 806 and 780. 780 is a smidgen larger, but once set the difference will be totally invisible. It also seems a teensy bit more symmetrical in pattern (and it's $300 less). However, I prefer 806 - at least in the video. It's crisper and more lively. Compared to the "reference" (the one with the knot), the reference is more contrasted overall, and probably a bit less fiery. It's also a bit more schmutzy, but the inclusions are so spread out and not under the table that I don't think you'll ever see them (unlike some of the others here: our eye/brain system learns to spot patterns and over time things become more easily visible...). In all, and ignoring the knotty question AND the price difference (if any), I'd stick with 911 - based on the video.
  13. Very likely! It's possible that JA's supplier has been extra careful, and oriented the stone as in the report; nice of them. You see: you have good eyes, and I know what to look for... together we make a good team. 😉 I've looked at the video again, and I can still see something very similar "higher up" (i.e at 1:30) - either one could be a reflection of the other (or my eye-brain system making something up), which is another reason why it's really important to see these things "live". Honestly - nothing to worry about, and you got yourself a lovely stone. Congratulations!
  14. It's not going to look like a dot at all. If the external edges were visible it would not have got "excellent" polish (or a VS2 overall clarity). It should look a bit like this: (the parallel lines "inside" the facet - they are a grain boundary)
  15. That's what I was trying to say with my "point 3." above. Yes, it's definitely not a bad knot. FWIW, I think I have located it in the video; it's on the star facet at 1:30 (between noon and 3 o'clock with the table facing you), but the easiest way to see it is as a "shimmer" in the side view as the video rotates: that's the edge between the knot crystal and the main crystal, and you can see the grain lines there. At least, I think. This said, the only real way of seeing these things (and assessing whether they are visually bothering you or not, apart from any concern on the integrity, which I hope is addressed to the extent I can from my first post) is to do so in person. A video is not really a good proxy for a real diamond in which you are trying to find an inclusion.
  16. davidelevi

    INTERNAL graining and SURFACE Graining not shown.

    Thanks! I suspect it's Brown or Grey, since if it were green it would be considered a fancy colour, and it would be worth quite a bit more than a K-colour. Bear in mind that a J will look warm in some circumstances regardless of the tone of the tint, and distinguishing a brown from a yellow tint in a J is not something that can be done via photos (GIA would argue that any tint in a J is so faint that it cannot be graded reliably - from K onward GIA will say "faint brown" or "faint grey"; if nothing else is added, it's assumed "faint yellow"). Also, in my experience, a brown tint is often more difficult to detect than a yellow one in real life, although the effect is subtly different; it can look almost pink if set right. However, and with the greatest respect, if one of your priorities is to have a diamond "look as white as possible", J is not where I would start.
  17. davidelevi

    INTERNAL graining and SURFACE Graining not shown.

    Looking forward to it. BN isn't the most cooperative vendor in this respect, but things may have changed. I'll ask my question again, if you have a second: what is BGM?
  18. Hello, welcome to Diamond Review! It's important to understand what a knot is. Diamonds often contain crystals of diamond or other minerals which are fully included in the larger rough diamond to be turned into a cut stone. When the diamond is cut and polished, some of these inclusions may break through the surface. If the included mineral is "something other than diamond", it is so much softer than the rest that it is typically torn away leaving a cavity; when the inclusion is another diamond, it may do the same and fly off, or it may remain as part of the finished surface of the main stone but as a separate crystal: that's a knot. Three key points to note: 1. The knot has survived the cutting and polishing. That is a LOT of pressure and very high temperatures. It is extremely unlikely to "come out" and leave a cavity during normal use. 2. The diamond has been graded VS2 by GIA; this means that they (subjectively but expertly) assess that there is no risk to integrity or durability of the stone from its characteristics (including the knot - i.e. it's solidly in its place) 3. As you assumed, the symbols are usually listed in order of importance, which would mean that this knot, even though it's relatively large, has the grain oriented in the same direction as the main crystal and it is not causing any strain Add to this that it seems quite difficult to locate (however, be careful: I'm not sure that the person at JA actually had the diamonds in his/her hands, unless you were on a video call and could see what's going on at their end.. so check carefully when it gets to you; a decent loupe is only about $25), and I think you are in a pretty safe place. The rest of the proportions look absolutely fine. Congratulations!
  19. davidelevi

    INTERNAL graining and SURFACE Graining not shown.

    Graining (internal or external) may affect transparency since (esp. internal) it is a sign of strain in the crystal lattice. Will it do so to a point that it is visible? Most likely not in a VS1 stone, but seeing it is the only way to tell. Light performance is so vague a concept as to be impossible to answer. Does an opaque or translucent stone exhibit "light performance"? If the answer is "no, because there is no significant internal reflection/refraction", then graining can affect "light performance", since it can affect transparency... [What is BGM?] They are largely equivalent (and hiding some weight in the girdle), if you are not bothered by the smattering of stuff in the SI1, but there is no indication beyond the report proportions of what the VS1 actually looks like. The fact that it is quite cheap for the grading makes me think there is some issue with it.
  20. davidelevi

    PLEASE HELP!! I diamond vs J colour diamond

    Hi there! Important starting point: fluorescence of any type isn't going to manifest in normal interior lighting, so if you are counting on it to "whiten" the stone, it may happen (to a very limited extent with "medium blue"), but only in sunlight or in any case light containing enough UV radiation to activate the fluorescence. The two stones you have picked have good overall proportions; the J will however look a little smaller side-by-side, and one of the inclusions in the I may just about be visible when observed closely, but no more than the smattering that (I think) don't bother you in the J... no reliable test other than the real test of seeing it. The real question is whether you (or anyone else) will notice the colour, and on this I am firmly sitting on the fence. Partly because colour sensitivity is very variable across individuals, and partly because it depends a lot on context: lighting, angle of observation, setting style/shape/material, what else is nearby, what is behind the stone and what you (she) will be comparing it to - there will be comparisons, and against a D it will look warm; the typical engagement ring stone I see in the UK is more J-K, so it will be OK in most cases, I think In "average" circumstances, J-K is generally where people start noticing colour; I can see it fairly easily in the face-up photo and definitely through the side - but it's magnified, loose, on a well-lit neutral background and I have reasonable training (and I'm looking for colour). The I is definitely less tinted and I like it better overall, but whether it's "worth" 20% more for you I don't know
  21. davidelevi

    Vintage Diamond ring from mother

    It could be, though I suspect it would be called "transitional" or "circular brilliant" by GIA. GIA is quite specific in what it calls "Old European Cut", and stones need to comply with a number of quantitative criteria regarding table and culet size, steepness of crown and style of pavilion cut, and while I haven't got the measurements with any level of precision your diamond looks a bit more "modern" than GIA's OEC definition would imply. It definitely isn't a modern cut, and many sellers would call it OEC! If you are interested, here are some technical details - and more importantly photos to compare to your stone to: https://www.gia.edu/gia-news-research-round-brilliant-cut-diamond-pay (the video - although it's a CAD rendering - is quite good in my opinion at illustrating the differences).
  22. davidelevi

    Vintage Diamond ring from mother

    Then I would say "around 1 ct"; probably over. A well-cut modern 1 ct round brilliant is around 6.45 - 6.55 mm, and older cut stones tend to be heavier for the same diameter. A "7 mm" modern stone (precisely measured) would be probably closer to 1.25 - 1.30 ct, so if this is actually 7.00 mm (measured say with a pair of precision calipers, if not a diamond gauge) it could be as much as 1.40 ct. The only way of knowing for sure is to unset the diamond and put it on jeweller's scales.
  23. davidelevi

    Vintage Diamond ring from mother

    Hello and welcome to DiamondReview! The ring has French hallmarks for 18 kt gold, and that design (which I call "radiator fins", but I suppose it's meant to look like a sun's rays) was popular between the end of the 1920s and the 1940s. The stone is also an old(ish) cut, probably from the 1920-1940 period as well (high crown, small table, short lower girdle facets, small culet). Unfortunately I know of no systematic report of French makers marks, so who or what stands for "GXS" (?) remains a mystery. The carat weight of the stone is very difficult to determine from photos; generally the setting was used to make smaller stones (0.25 - 0.40 ct) look larger by having light reflect off the metal, so I would guess it's roughly of that size. It could be bigger, though - it looks larger on your hand in the video, but perhaps you have very slim fingers. If you can take a measurement of the diameter I may be a little more precise.
  24. davidelevi

    Opinions on ASET images of 1.25 Carat Cushion

    Hm. The images (especially the ASET) are quite tilted (ASET L-R and IS T-B), or the stone is a bit wonky (unlikely, given the GIA symmetry grade). The stone may be further out of the scope funnel than theoretically it should be. Assuming they are sufficiently correct to be usable, it's a nicely symmetrical stone with a fair amount of brightness, but also quite a bit of leakage. Better than average, but a long way away from the "best" (in terms of brightness). It also tells you nothing about fire, which (to me, at least) is one of the main "beauty characteristics" of a cushion. It has a decent crown height and a very variable girdle profile - which could be a sign of some care taken in cutting; the price is also competitive. The questions/issues as I see it are: 1. I find reflector images tell only part of the story, especially for fancy shapes (at least this one is nearly square). I - personally - find a well taken video, especially if comparative of 2-3 stones, much more telling. Can the vendor supply that?(not the junk they posted on B2C - that is so post-processed that it looks almost like a CAD rendering, if it isn't one) 2. Do you trust the vendor to be supplying honest reflector images? Technically, the few degrees of tilt they have introduced are excusable; if they (deliberately or not) pulled the stone out of the reflector because the image is then "better, with more red" it's a different kettle of fish.
  25. davidelevi

    Welcome To Beyond The Bling

    May I suggest that you repost your question in your own thread/topic, rather than just after a pinned thread where the moderator clearly says in the opening post: It's really easy to start your own topic. Honest. Just go to any forum (for example, this one: https://www.diamondreview.com/forum/forum/18-community/) and click on that big green button that says "Start new topic". I'll wait 24 hours before flagging your post for moderation/deletion. Good luck with your new business!