LaurentGeorge

A-List Jeweler
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About LaurentGeorge

  • Rank
    Ideal Diamond

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New York, NY

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  1. LaurentGeorge

    Gangster’s Diamond ring from the 20s-30s value

    Also keep in mind that the replacement value or what the physical ring is worth will be higher if you have any kind of supporting documentation as to its provenance. Do you know which gangster he won it from? Was he famous? Are there any pictures of the gangster wearing this ring? Without supporting documentation, unfortunately the ring is just worth its physical value with no added historical bonus.
  2. LaurentGeorge

    Colored diamond????

    Be aware that bringing it to a jeweler for appraisal will give you a biased opinion - not necessarily of content, but primarily for value. Jewelers and appraisers who work for jewelers have a vested interest in what they tell you. If you can, try to find an independent appraiser, one who does not buy or sell or work for anybody who buys or sells jewelry. Neil aka denverappraiser is such an independent appraiser. He may be a valuable resource. I would recommend a direct conversation with him as you proceed further. btw, for what it's worth, just from the pictures you have provided, my guess is RUBY for the center. Good luck.
  3. What would you like us to review? You went and saw a large number of diamonds and selected the one you liked best within your budget. You can compare prices yourself on the DiamondFinder (link above) https://www.diamondreview.com/diamonds?sortOrder=carat&sortDesc=0&fShape=Rnd&fCaratLo=2.50&fCaratHi=2.55&fColorLo=H&fColorHi=H&fClarityLo=VS2&fClarityHi=VS2&fCutLo=exc&fCutHi=exc&fDepthLo=61.0&fDepthHi=62.4&fTableLo=57.0&fTableHi=59.0&fSymLo=ideal&fSymHi=exc&fPolLo=ideal&fPolHi=exc&fCulLo=none&fCulHi=none&fFlrLo=none&fFlrHi=none&fPriceLo=0&fPriceHi=1000000&fLabGIA=1&adv=1 The setting, in 18K gold should run about $1500 to $2500 depending on total carat weight. Based on comps, the price is a little high, but we are comparing to online dealers where you don't get to see 25 to 30 stones. All the numbers we tend to obsess over are primarily used to eliminate lesser stones from virtual lists. It's a way to narrow the choices and increase the likelihood of the stone you buy being a good looking stone. This one passed your test - your eyes. Had this been one on a list of stones presented here, I may have suggested looking for a stone with a slightly smaller table, slightly higher crown and slightly steeper crown angles because I believe tweaks in those parameters might give you a better looking stone. But that's according to what I personally prefer. You have used your eyes and chosen this stone. It's most likely the right choice
  4. LaurentGeorge

    Could G.I.A. make an error in the depth percentage on a certificate?

    I have actually just tested the various scenarios and found a number of inconsistencies but for the most part, Neil's explanation works.
  5. LaurentGeorge

    Could G.I.A. make an error in the depth percentage on a certificate?

    The GIA figures the depth % as the depth/ the average diameter.
  6. LaurentGeorge

    Opinion on this 1.85 ct, RB, G, VVS2

    Great pictures !!! Davide and Neil covered the vast majority of the points very well. When it comes to your last statement that ...your stone is in the top performing stones out there. You can rest assured it likely performs in the top couple of percent of all stones. The last couple of percent could potentially cost you an extra chunk of change and the net result is that you would get a stone which would look identical to the one you have. That extra little bit of perfection is indistinguishable to the naked eye and it takes computer analyses to determine the difference. I think you did extremely well and there is no need to second guess your choice. Congrats!
  7. LaurentGeorge

    Found a 1.42 cushion cut vs Emeral cut 1.4

    Congratulations! I will differ with my colleague here; the real test is whether she likes it! Your opinion is less important. 😉
  8. LaurentGeorge

    Advise Needed Please Help! :)

    Agree with both of the above. This is a situation where these "X-ray" videos, as I like to refer to them, really don't help. They allow you to see what is there which is great in the realm of full disclosure, but they do not help you determine how eye-clean they necessarily are. In terms of SI1 stones, there are plenty of stones out there with less intrusive imperfections. Unless there is some reason you are tied to these particular stones, I would probably keep looking.
  9. LaurentGeorge

    Opinion on this 1.85 ct, RB, G, VVS2

    Nothing wrong with putting a hold on a stone but I don't expect you will have any issues with the one you have ordered. This one will also be stunning. The difference between G and H will be virtually indistinguishable once set and on her hand. The VS2 should not be visible, so again, indistinguishable from the VVS. The 0.5° on the crown will not make a difference as it is within the margin of error of that measurement to begin with (that angle is an average of several measurements taken all around the girdle).
  10. LaurentGeorge

    Opinion on this 1.85 ct, RB, G, VVS2

    Indeed. The new ring is certainly going to be stunning. Congrats.
  11. LaurentGeorge

    Opinion on this 1.85 ct, RB, G, VVS2

    This stone looks like a winner. I really cannot say anything would be a potential problem. If I had to be hyper-critical, I would question the need for a VVS rather than getting a slightly larger stone with a VS clarity, but that's me really looking for something to say. 😉
  12. LaurentGeorge

    Is this SI2?

    Smaller diamonds are not worthless but you have to consider the process. Small stones or melees are usually purchased by jewelry manufacturers in specific sizes for the pieces they are making. These are not stones that are purchased individually by their customers. So when you go to sell these little stones, the jeweler has to consider the cost of the labor to remove them from the setting, the probability of some being damaged in the process and the resulting odd number of sizes he/she may not have any use for. Remember that a large portion of the original cost of the setting is the labor that went into making the ring. This is why settings, with or without smaller stones in them are not worth more than scrap at resale.
  13. LaurentGeorge

    Is this SI2?

    I agree with Davide. Based on the photos, SI2 is likely a fair grade. Old euros and old mine cuts are not as brilliant as modern cuts and imperfections tend to be more visible in these cuts. The only thing that bothers me is the fact that you did not seem to know it was there before bringing it home. The jeweler should have made you aware of the imperfection. Diamonds love oils and dirt and when they are not at their cleanest, it is easier to see imperfections. The ring was probably very clean in the store and there was probably a multitude of spotlights on the ceiling which adds more sparkle to everything. You need to decide if you can live with the imperfection and consider your jeweler's return policy before making a final determination.
  14. LaurentGeorge

    Is this SI2?

    It's essentially impossible to grade a stone based on a picture and if the ring is dirty or the picture is not totally focused and zoomed in, it's entirely futile. Was the stone graded by a reliable independent lab like the GIA or AGS? Or did you rely solely on the vendor's description? In his defense, SI2 imperfections can be and often are visible to the naked eye, but they should not be blatantly obvious. Had you seen the stone before purchasing it? To me, in this picture, this does not look like a new ring, but that could just be the photography. Try cleaning the ring and putting down on a white surface. Then take your camera/phone and stabilize it on the table and zoom in. Take a few shots until you get one that clearly shows what you are referring to.
  15. LaurentGeorge

    What do you think of this diamond?

    Overall the proportions are nice. Ovals tend to be a little deeper than rounds so the 66.9% depth is not an issue. My only hesitation is the position of the imperfection. Every oval has a bow tie; an area in the center of the stone where the scintillation is reduced because of the geometry of the stone. Ideally we would want the imperfection to be in the more brilliant parts of the stone but in this case it is in the bow tie area and could potentially be more likely visible because of it.