denverappraiser

A-List Appraiser
  • Content Count

    7200
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by denverappraiser

  1. They do have different packaging for different items and some things come with a drawstring bag instead of a box. One thing about Tiffany is that they're supportive of their clients. Even clients who buy what is, for them, inexpensive goods. Call them up and ask. They're sensitive about the boxes because they don't want to fuel the market for knockoffs by supplying genuine boxes but if they owe you a box, they'll produce one.
  2. denverappraiser

    Are GSI reputable and reliable certifications?

    No matter who graded the stone, if you’re worried about the reliability of the grading, have it checked out by your own expert. Where are you and I’ll try and send you a referral? Most are not expensive and there is far more important information than appears on the lab documents. Remember, it's not a second opinion if it comes from the same source as the first. To answer your question. GSI is a large operation that provides sales documents to a wide range of dealers. They’re popular with the chain and department stores. Do with that information as you wish. You’re right to be nervous about claimed discounts as well as the grading details. Those are among the questions to ask in the above appraisal session with YOUR expert.
  3. denverappraiser

    Starting your own inventory

    Get a thermal diamond tester. Ebay has them cheaply. I wouldn’t get the kit from idealscope. The $25 one is just fine for what you’re doing unless it’s intended to be part of the sales presentation. As a warning on sales presentations, it’s unlikely that what you buy will be very impressive under an IS unless you get into the recutting business. That’s an entirely different can of worms. Most of what’s out there is pretty bad in terms of cutting, and most sellers don’t want to highlight that. The only problem with the $25 one is that the lens is made of plastic, so you need to be careful not to damage it as you schlep it around. There are better sources for tweezers and the like. $125 won’t get you a single color master, much less a set. The one you linked to is CZ, which is not the same thing. As mentioned previously, this is the #1 stickler for people getting into this business. CZs are trouble. Theoretically, synthetics would be ok but in practice I've never seen a set. Those are nice enough lamps, but I’ll warn you they’re a little bit fragile if you’re going to be on the road with it. Again, consider your purpose. The sales presentation is different than buying. Ott makes a lot of choices that are popular. By the way, the lamp is for color grading, not brightness/fire/scintillation. If you’re traveling, lack of standardized lighting at client sites is a HUGE problem. Buy a better loupe. 10x Hastings triplet. I use a Nikon but there are others as well. I”ve had the same loupe for decades. Schneider is well regarded. Expect to spend over $100, not $12. Look to Kassoy, not ebay. While we're at it, cheap tweezers suck. If you are doing work at a client site, bringing in a microscope mostly isn’t a choice. They’re too cumbersome to travel with, Certainly not a good one. A decent scope will be expensive. My primary one is made by Wild Heerbrugg but you have to do a retrofit to get a darkfield. GIA Instruments sells them. Meiji Techno is popular. Don’t skimp here. If you really get into the grading business, this will become your #1 go-to tool. $1500 probably isn’t enough. Get a camera with a good lens and practice with it. You'll find it more useful for sales than you ever imagined.
  4. denverappraiser

    Inclusions in bought diamond

    I understand. 'Eye visible' is not the standard for clarity grading because it depends so much on your vision, the lighting, what the viewer knows to look for and similar non-gemological properties. Most 0.31 SI2's for most viewers under most viewing conditions are eye-clean. I realize that that's a lot of weasel words but the answer to your question is to look at the stone, not to rely on the grading report. A photo doesn't help. If you've got a return policy and enough time to deal with it, your risk is low. Get it, look at it, and proceed accordingly. You may consider using the help of an independent appraiser with an experienced eye and a standardized lighting environment if it worries you.
  5. denverappraiser

    Inclusions in bought diamond

    Why are you second-guessing this? What has you worried?
  6. denverappraiser

    How to get traffic and sales?

    For example, here's a thousand competitors, all of which are cheaper than you and most of which are paying for their placement ahead of you. https://www.google.com/search?q=malachite+cabochon+30+x+40&tbm=shop&sxsrf=ACYBGNSDMrSoJzVan8uIEHev_9_-QSc-5A:1576603089461&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi9heWYmL3mAhUQK80KHZTjDRcQ_AUIDigB&biw=1536&bih=722&dpr=1.25
  7. denverappraiser

    How to get traffic and sales?

    Advertising costs money. Often quite a bit. Big-time online dealers like James Allen and Blue Nile have 6 digit budgets for this. Sometimes you can pay on the back-end, like etsy or ebay, where you're paying a commission on sales, but fundamentally, if you want to be an online store you're going to have to break out the credit card. Even then, it's a bit tricky to decide WHO to pay. Google and facebook good places to start but it's not the end. If it makes you feel any better, 250 hits in a month is pretty good for a brand new site without any marketing effort. Posts like the above will do nothing for you other than, perhaps, result in some good advice (for free!!).
  8. denverappraiser

    Starting your own inventory

    By the way, as much as I'm a fan of GIA education for the right circumstances, I'm not yet convinced your situation applies. It's about like learning to ride a bike by reading a book. Practice and good feedback are keys. You do need to practice the right things but it's on you, not so much the school.
  9. denverappraiser

    Starting your own inventory

    You’ll need a Leveridge gauge or equivalent. Personally I like presidium equipment but there are lots of choices. Get a good scale. Uv light. Thermal tester. The tool that usually chokes beginning buyers is a set of diamond color masters (not cz’s). A good microscope should be high on your list. A good camera (not just a cell phone). Tweezers, trays, and assorted things like that. You'll need good data sources and good contacts for sales. Are you expecting to set up an office where people bring things to you for sale or are going to be a traveling ’picker’ buying from places like pawn shops where you go to them (and take your equipment with you)?
  10. denverappraiser

    Starting your own inventory

    Hi Thomas, I use a Sarine diascan and am very happy with it. OGI out of Israel is their biggest competitor for this sort of equipment. They're a little cheaper and also very popular. Honestly, most people do it with a loupe and some practice. That said.... Are you serious? The most important thing is skill on the part of the operator, not the tools. I definitely would not call a screener for type IIA diamonds the first and most important first step but the Gemlogis isn't a bad tool. I would call the most important some education, a loupe and a lamp. If you're trying to train yourself, reflectors like Idealscopes or ASETs are pretty helpful and less than 1% of the price of the Sarine thing. Do you plan on buying inventory based on your own grading talents backed with your own money? What do you plan to DO with this inventory after you get it? Retail them? Sell them to the trade? That's the hard part. You're probably going to have to GIA them anyway. If you want to be a jeweler, and I do think it can be a pretty good gig for the right person, I think you're focusing on the wrong area. Selling is way harder than buying, and people who are good at the selling part usually find that sources aren't that hard to find.
  11. denverappraiser

    Aig

    Thanks for the plug. As Davide mentioned, appraisals are mostly local affairs. Some good places to look for referrals are: www.appraisers.org www.ags.org www.najaappraisers.com www.ja-world.com If you can tell us where you are, I"ll be happy to try and give a local appraiser. There are a lot of TLAs out there (three-letter acronyms) and I'm hesitant to make any sort of comment based on that alone, but I will say that although it's popular in the corporate sphere, most retailers don't use them. No, there's nothing specifically wrong, it's just unusual. Is this a store somewhere? You say you bought a diamond from them. Can you tell us more? Is this the brand name on some sort of certificate or the name of the store (or both)?
  12. denverappraiser

    Please help between these 2 diamonds

    Ask ’em. Often it's a matter of supply. In the internet databases, the seller usually isn't the owner, and the owner is who sets the prices. They can ASK whatever they want.
  13. denverappraiser

    Please help between these 2 diamonds

    The HCA doesn't really apply here. In both cases, you've got better information in the form of the AGS cut grade. You can't grade color from a photograph, especially a photo you didn't take and don't even know who did. Color grades are tiny steps and the variations in photo procedures account for far more. Frankly, I'd go with neither and find a 1.50+. It's not that hard, it's not that much more money, and if it bugs you now, it'll bug you more later. If you need to bring the budget down, compromise a little bit on clarity.
  14. denverappraiser

    GEL certified tennis bracelet

    Pretty much every jeweler sells in-line bracelets. Prices vary wildly with the details. This leads to the question of what you're looking for and what led you to that particular one. This is not a high-end piece and I presume it's being sold based on price. I make that guess from the metalwork, the non-standard grading scale on the stones, and the claim that it's ’certified’, whatever that means. The purpose of the GEL thing is to guide you in the way you're shopping.
  15. denverappraiser

    25 Gram raw .. Diamond or Quartz

    I'm not very familiar with Saudia Arabia or the merchants there so I can't give you a very useful direct referral but separating diamond from quartz (and other things) is not generally very difficult. Around here, look for an appraiser, a gemologist, or a geologist. There are many of each. Most can do this while you wait, while you watch, and for a nominal or even no fee. If there's not a place that such places would advertise, try asking a jewelry store for a referral.
  16. denverappraiser

    James w

    Traditionally speaking, SI2-->VV2 on otherwise similar stones almost doubles the price. H-->K nearly halves it. 2.09-->2.50 adds about 20% to the price. These aren't really gemological questions, they're matters of taste. I"m not going to give an answer to which is better because it's a bit like asking if you would be happier with a vintage Ferrari or a Tesla. They're simply not the same things even if the price is similar. Similarly, the right price on the wrong thing is no bargain. Is color more important to you than clarity or visa versa? As Davide points out, the Diamond Finder utility at the top of the page is very useful for this. It's free and anonymous. The market advertising here is the US Internet, which is one of the most competitive in the world. Here's a dozen or so offers for comparable stones to the 2.09. The prices are comparable enough. All things being equal, I would prefer to buy from a local vendor although I"m not clear on whether they actually have these stones to show you or if they are just offering to buy them on the internet for you. For me, that's not all that valuable but they may have trade-in programs, warranties, or just nice people that would tip the balance. If you buy in the UK, you will pay VAT, which is considerable, but if you take it out of the country within some reasonable amount of time, you can get a refund. My understanding is that this is a pain although I've never personally done it. If you live in Qatar there is very little reason to seriously consider buying in the UK. https://www.diamondreview.com/diamonds?sortOrder=price&sortDesc=0&fShape=Rnd&fCaratLo=2.09&fCaratHi=2.18&fColorLo=K&fColorHi=K&fClarityLo=VVS2&fClarityHi=VVS2&fCutLo=&fCutHi=poor&fDepthLo=50.0&fDepthHi=80.0&fTableLo=40.0&fTableHi=80.0&fSymLo=&fSymHi=poor&fPolLo=&fPolHi=poor&fCulLo=&fCulHi=vlarge&fFlrLo=&fFlrHi=vstrong&fPriceLo=0&fPriceHi=1000000&fLabGIA=1
  17. denverappraiser

    Opinions on these diamonds pls - which is better cut

    What I was looking for was the plotting diagram and fluorescence. Neither is related to what you asked, but fluorescence can have a big effect on price and since price is your big topic, it seems relevant. Just post the link to the site on GIA for the whole report.
  18. denverappraiser

    Opinions on these diamonds pls - which is better cut

    Why didn't they provide the whole report? Several important line items are missing. Are you confident it's otherwise comparable? (I"ll leave it to others write on the question of the proportion)
  19. denverappraiser

    Opinions on these diamonds pls - which is better cut

    I don't doubt that Brian is cheaper but bear in mind that the local jeweler is probably including VAT and maybe local taxes and Brian does not. You'll have to pay those at the time of import and it's only fair to include it in your math.
  20. denverappraiser

    Reselling market for high jewelry

    I would NOT start looking for an appraiser at a jewelry store. Some good resources (assuming you're in the US) www.najaappraisers.com National Association of Jewelry Appraisers www.ags.org American Gem Society www.appraisers.org American Society of Appraisers
  21. denverappraiser

    Reselling market for high jewelry

    Look for a professional appraisal. Where are you? Where is the merchandise? Who did the authentication? Assuming that you were the client for the authentication, start by talking to them. If not, be very nervous about this topic. You're talking about betting half a million dollars on this topic alone. Bear in mind that you're not seeing an insurance document and 'appraisals' supplied by the seller don't count for much. Hire your own. You describe your situation as 'having your eyes on'. Can you elaborate? Have you actually seen the item(s) or is this some online sales platform? Is $900k the selling price or something else?
  22. denverappraiser

    Reselling market for high jewelry

    Let’s assume another scenario. You bought it used and cheap from some outlet like a pawn shop or auction and are hoping to make a killing. There's nothing fundamentally wrong with this, but usually, it doesn’t work out for the above reasons and more. Fakes are plentiful in that market but, assuming it’s real, there’s almost certainly issues with the piece. That’s why it’s in a pawn shop in the first place. If they could have sold it at Christie's for the big money, normally that’s what they would have done and even if someone pawned it, that’s what the pawnshop owner would have done. It never would have made it to the case with the $1,000 price tag in the first place. That leaves venues like garage and estate sales where the seller doesn’t know what they have. The owner died and the heirs are dumb. It's in the $1/each bin. It happens, but not nearly as much as people think. As with the above, seek out professional assistance if you think this is the case. Authentication is the first hurdle and it can be a doozy.
  23. denverappraiser

    Reselling market for high jewelry

    I work in this space fairly often so I think it’s fair to say that yes, I have experience in it even though I don’t have the budget. For starters, almost always there’s an issue of who says it’s worth $900k? This gets fuzzed OFTEN. Did it sell at retail new for this? To you? Did some appraiser say it and then sold it on a discount website for ‘pennies on the dollar’? The difference is obviously important and there are others in between. Let's assume, just for discussion's sake, that you bought it new for $900k and now want to resellet. Yes, you will almost certainly lose money on this deal. The normal way such things change hands is either in high-end specialty stores or at auction. Presumably, you are neither of these so you’re going to pay a commission. Expect 15-40% of the sales price after you add up all of the various premiums and fees. Then there’s the problem of new vs. used. Diamonds don’t change so much but the designer premium most definitely does. A used Cartier piece, for example, normally goes for quite a bit less than a similar new one at the store (and that's before we get into the commission question). This is a VERY specialized marketplace. Million-dollar pieces trade a few dozen times per year, worldwide, and the customers, quite reasonably are extremely picky. They have plenty of choices. It can sometimes be very difficult to find a buyer and it can take years, which is why people are willing to pay those commissions. If you’re selling to a dealer where they are now taking the risks, expect your realized price to drop drastically. Not to sound self-serving, but if your $900k number is anything like realistic, I recommend professional assistance. There are decisions here with 6-digit ramifications and anonymous opinions online is not a good way to make them.
  24. denverappraiser

    I need

    Why did you edit it to delete the picture? Although it's true that it's impossible to do a stone ID from a photograph, it's not possible to even discuss it without the pictures.
  25. denverappraiser

    Bought from oldtreasures333

    Not all sapphires are transparent. I'm with Davide, if you're unhappy, send it back forthwith. If you're concerned that the description may be incorrect and your decision will depend on that, get it appraised by an independent appraiser (in this sense meaning someone who isn't buying or selling or otherwise involved in the transaction). Do be quick about it. Often sellers have a time limit on your ability to return things and it isn't all that long.