denverappraiser

A-List Appraiser
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About denverappraiser

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    Ideal Diamond

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    Male
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    Denver Colorado, USA

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  1. denverappraiser

    Genuine Antique Diamond Engagement Ring?

    Age doesn't drive the price. Quality does. Whether this is 50 years old or 100 or 3 is an interesting academic question but it's just that, an academic question.
  2. denverappraiser

    Genuine Antique Diamond Engagement Ring?

    A common exchange I have with clients: Q: How old is my diamond? A: 2.5 billion years, give or take a few.
  3. denverappraiser

    Genuine Antique Diamond Engagement Ring?

    When I was an apprentice, back in the 70's, I made several of these. Some appraiser somewhere is looking at one of mine and wondering if it's an antique based on these same clues we're talking about. I wasn't as good at it as whoever made this one, but I like to think mine are good enough to pass the muster as an 'antique'.
  4. denverappraiser

    Genuine Antique Diamond Engagement Ring?

    Sorry to use a technical term without explanation. I was a bench jeweler for a long time and this is just one of those words that crept into my vocabulary. Azuring has to do with those side stones. The little ones. Those are set using a tool called a graver, which looks and operates a bit like a chisel, but the very first step is to drill a hole. Holes are round. If you look at the back of the stones in the picture, the holes are pentagonal, square and other puzzle pieces that fit in the space, but not round. That’s done with a file and elbow grease. It’s time-consuming, significantly more difficult than it looks, and not visible from the top. It makes the ring smoother on the inside, easier to clean, and it gives it a finished look from the back, but it’s not really ‘better’ in the usual use of that word. The result is that people doing modern reproductions rarely bother to do it. It doesn't mean they can't, they just usually don't (and increasingly they can't. This takes a fair amount of practice and it's becoming a lost skill).
  5. denverappraiser

    Genuine Antique Diamond Engagement Ring?

    That would not be difficult to remove and reset and I wouldn’t let that be a deal killer for sending it to GIA if you want. It takes time and a few hundred dollars, but that’s about it. That said, GIA won’t give you a date even if they see it. It’s an OEC and that’s the end of that. They’ll give a solid answer to the clarity, weight, and color, and will end any arguments on those points but that’s really the only reason to get them involved at this point. An independent evaluation is only as good as it’s author. Look into who signed it and see if you find them credible. Anyone worth listening to will have footprints on the net. That’s who is giving the circa date and, for lack of a GIA, the grading details on the stone. That style was popular around that era, and they’re not now, but there’s nothing about stone or metal that can be 100% dated. There are several positive signs for antiquity, like the azuring below the stones (google it), and the way the stones are set using a graver. This is not a CAD piece. It’s also possible that it’s an antique piece with a new(ish) stone but there’s no real way to test that. Most stones from that era aren’t that round or that white but ’most’ is an important weasel word. It sounds to me like the dealer gave you provenance to about as good a level as they can. I don’t see any red flags. You can always get it appraised by your own expert if you want. I may be biased, but that always strikes me as a good idea at this price point. It's not a second opinion if it comes from the same source as the first and an 'independent' appraiser who is working for the seller is grounds for the question.
  6. denverappraiser

    GSI engraved diamond

    Most big fancy jewelry stores don't buy from the public at all although I don't know that particular store. 'Ripoff' is a loaded word but it's correct that pawnshops are rarely the highest payers. Then again, they normally pay cash and they normally do deals fairly quickly, which is important to some clients. I've written quite a bit on this general topic and a bit of searching would save me some typing.
  7. denverappraiser

    GSI engraved diamond

    He didn't tell you what you could sell it for, he told you what HE would pay. That's a valid enough answer, but it's not the answer to the question you asked (which is why you are here). The correct answer to the wrong question is not an 'appraisal'.
  8. denverappraiser

    GSI engraved diamond

    RE: Davide's comment on GSL. That's a Canadian lab that also goes by Gemscan and a few other names. GSL is their US subsidiary. They do a lot of business with the big chain sellers like Zales and Sears. As far as I can tell, they don't do any business with the public.
  9. denverappraiser

    GSI engraved diamond

    I note in the GSL report that the diamond was estimated at 0.52cts. That turns out to be important. The margin of error is more than 0.02 and if it's under 0.50cts, or the buyers think it is based on their own estimates, it will have a significant effect on the bids.
  10. denverappraiser

    GSI engraved diamond

    What you was received was not an appraisal, free or not. It was a bid. I tend to bristle at this confusion even though it’s common but I”ll give the guy the benefit of the doubt and say he called it right and that it was you who was confused. So was he right? He, of course, can bid whatever he wants just as you can accept it or not as you want. I think $250 is low. Shop him around. Most cities have a fairly big industry in this. For the most part, this is a recycling job because people don’t generally care for ‘used’ engagement rings, but this has as much to do with your own sales skills as it does the gemological properties of the stone. Recycling is easy and diamonds can be remounted in other things with little trouble. Gold is a commodity. ‘Retail price’ whatever that means, is irrelevant in any case. Assuming it’s undamaged and that the grading is reasonably accurate, I would expect offers to be more like double that. You might consider getting a real appraisal and asking these questions. That means an opinion from an expert who is working for YOU and who isn't trying to buy it. GSI worked for the original seller and, as mentioned above, the current guy wasn't doing an appraisal at all. I say you 'might' want to do this because this will run you something like $100 (I charge a little more than that) and that may end up being a significant fraction of your final money. It depends on how you value your time and efforts. It's not all that hard to do the legwork, collect some bids, and do a statistical analysis, but that's not a task that appeals to everyone and it can become time-consuming if you let it. As you point out, the credibility of the source(s) is important.
  11. denverappraiser

    Help choosing between round brilliants!

    ASET is unusual. That's an AGS thing. AGS is unusual, and AGS lab doesn't grade synthetics at all. Certain individual dealers like it, and I like it, but there are plenty who have never even heard of it, much less are practiced enough to take good pictures. It's a whole art form. The same holds for videos. I like them, and I'm all for asking, but it's a lot harder to do that than it looks and most dealers aren't prepared.
  12. denverappraiser

    Help choosing between round brilliants!

    You’re assuming some facts not in evidence here. For example, the difference between ‘ideal’ and ‘super ideal’. Neither term is well defined and different dealers do not use the same standards. In the case of synthetics, color and clarity fall in this category as well. The graders don’t all use the same scales and they don’t all apply the scales in the same ways. #1 Know who the labs are and have an opinion. Personally, I like GCAL and IGI Hong Kong, in that order, but there are a lot to choose from and they are not all the same. #2 Know and understand claims like idealness and that ASET image (It almost certainly did NOT come from the lab, which begs the question of where it did come from. As with the above, there are many different ways of taking these photos and they are not directly comparable.) #3 Know your sources. That’s decent generic advice for shopping round brilliants, either mined or synthetic, but the internet is full of nonsense. Assign credibility to your sources, be aware of hidden agendas and ignore the charlatans. Including us by the way. The fact that we’re handing out free advice on the internet is a mark against, not in favor. I’m happy to provide my agenda (this is advertising for me). Apply this standard to all of your sources. Relying on random internet guides is trouble. As mentioned by Davide, that ASET is either a bad example of a 'super ideal', a bad image, or possibly both.
  13. denverappraiser

    Worth the price?

    You can do better. I'm curious how you landed on this one. If size and price are your hot buttons, and they are for a lot of people so don't take that as a criticism, why are you shopping for F color? I would try more like J/I1 to K/SI2 and see what you find. You might even be able to bump the size a bit. Adding a grand or so to your budget would really help. You're giving up a lot in terms of beauty to hit your size/price target. It may be worth noting that you're fishing in a pool of 10,000+ stones and are looking for the dead cheapest one. That's almost guaranteed to have some issues. I wouldn't lose a moment of sleep over the fluorescence. Have you considered shapes other than round?
  14. denverappraiser

    Need help choosing between diamonds!

    photography can be tricky when looking at color. I wouldn't pay much attention to the borderlines. I would trust GIA over a camera and an unknown photographer on this. By a lot. See Davide's comments above about picking a dealer wisely. Other than tying up your credit for a little while and wasting some shopping time, your risk for shopping online is really rather low.
  15. denverappraiser

    Need help choosing between diamonds!

    At that size and color, clarity doesn't make all that much difference in the price. VVS2 isn't buying you much and it isn't costing you much. Unless there's something going on with the money beyond that $300, personally, I would go for the 2.52. You've got an extra .25mm in diameter and the bragging rights of 2.50+.