denverappraiser

A-List Appraiser
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About denverappraiser

  • Rank
    Ideal Diamond

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    Male
  • Location
    Denver Colorado, USA

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  1. denverappraiser

    How To Tell If Its A Diamond?

    Since we're talking about how to tell diamonds from other things without advanced instrumentation, one of the places to look is at the girdle. For technical manufacturing reasons, diamonds don't have a smooth, curved, polished girdle like this stone. They'll either have a series of small polished facets or a much rougher surface. They're also very rarely this thick and they'll often have tiny remains of the original crystal surface because the cutters want to retain weight.
  2. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    Again, don't overthink this. You've committed to the shipping, but that's all. When it arrives, look at it. Show it around. Compare it to others. You've got 30 days. Use them. (but mark that date on your calendar, just in case)
  3. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    Some people actually prefer it. That's contrast, which is the cause of 'life' in a stone when it moves.
  4. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    no
  5. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    I thought you said they couldn't do it. It's leaky around the edge of the table, probably from the shallow pavilion. Nice symmetry. It's tilted in the photograph.
  6. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    Who had the ASET?
  7. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    It’s not a done deal until you’re happy. Until you’ve seen it. Until you’ve shown it to your friends, your mother, your appraiser, maybe even your bride. ALL you are risking is a bit of time and some shipping. Don’t overthink this. Get some sleep, you'll be fine.
  8. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    Your cut is fine. Really. It's a GIA-xxx for heaven's sake. Don't loop over the depth%. FWIW, I personally wear a strong-blue. I mention all of that for the benefit of other readers because it came up several times. Don't loop on that either. A correctly graded medium blue, or even strong blue, will not exhibit the hazy effect known as overblue. That's a small percentage of very strong blues.
  9. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    Don't bet on them having reflector images. They might, but this is distinctly unusual outside of a rather small circle of dealers who sort of specialize in this. It's not a trivial thing to do. Again, I don't know these people from Adam, but they don't seem to be using this on their site.
  10. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    I, quite specifically, ducked the resale question. For starters, it’s largely irrelevant. Few people are buying diamonds as financial instruments and those who do are fools. But since it's come up 3 times now, I’ll address it. It’s true that fluorescent diamonds resell for less than otherwise similar non-fluorescent ones, especially in high colors. Then again, they cost less too. In a famous list used in the industry as ‘wholesale’, this stone prices out at $15,500. Generic GIA-xxx no-Flo’s typically sell at the discount vendors for something like $16k and resell to the sharks on the street for about half of that. That is to say, buy a stone for $15,500 and sell to the sharks with the spinney signs for $8,000.00. That’s a heck of a haircut, and it’s the reason I don’t call diamonds an investment, but what about this one? It costs $11000. Half would make it $5,500. That wouldn’t be all that hard. Buyers will slam it, because that’s what buyers do, but in the end it’ll still sell. No, you probably won't get $8k, but you didn't pay $16k either. Then there's the fashion component. Fluorescence used to be a feature. Now it's not. 'Blue white' commanded a premium. It's not that the stones are more or less beautiful than they ever were, it's that they aren't popular. For dealers that's important, and it does affect the price, but it's not a gemological property. What will be popular 20 years from now? Who the heck knows. It's changed considerably in the LAST 20 years after all. In short, don't sweat it. Nothing is being misrepresented here. This isn't the center of the cut bullseye, and you knew that, but did you know that the bullseye didn't even exist before 2006? D-medium gets slammed online at the moment and trades at a discount because of it. Yes, it does. So? Is that a feature or a problem?
  11. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    That’s up to you. I showed you a pretty good comp from a discounty seller that’s nearly 10% more money. That makes it a comparatively good price. I don’t see a particular problem with it. I’ve never heard of the dealer, which doesn’t matter a hill of beans, but do make sure to check their terms and conditions to make sure there are no zingers in there. Whether or not it’s what you want and if you should buy it is a totally different question. The right price on the wrong thing is no bargain.
  12. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    You're right, it's not the same stone (you can tell by checking the report numbers)
  13. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    Not everyone. https://www.b2cjewels.com/dd/9897330/round-diamond-D-color-VS1-Clarity?sku=9897330&utm_source=diamondreview.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=diamondreview.com
  14. denverappraiser

    Final Opinion Needed

    62.7 is still within the possible range of GIA excellent cut, and indeed they did just that. The problem here is that it’s not a very useful overall metric, which is why neither GIA nor AGS uses depth% in their cut calculations. In short answer, no it’s not likely to be a problem. Furqan is picking on the fluoro so hard because D/medium is such an unusual combination for people to seek out. That's why it's cheaper than what you're seeing as similar, not the depth percentage. (you didn't list a price or where it's coming from but one of the dealers in the database here is listing that same stone)
  15. denverappraiser

    Color change

    Diamonds are very attractive to grease and a few other sorts of gunk. Most fats are alcohol soluble and since alcohol evaporates rather quickly, you can end up just covering the surface if you aren’t careful to get it all off while it’s still ‘wet’. In any case, no it won’t hurt your diamond. Just clean it again. Again, use a cleaner that attacks grease like dish detergent of window cleaner and a soft brush and then rinse it off with clean water. Alcohol will work, but there are so many readily available cleaners that are better, what's the point?