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  1. Yesterday
  2. davidelevi

    Review these two diamonds please

    "True Hearts" is purely a marketing classification. This said, both diamonds are cut extremely well, in as far as it can be seen from the videos and reports. Personally, I prefer the cushion, because I like the shape more than a princess, and it's larger. The less tinted colour of the princess at 0.6x/0.7x is going to be unnoticeable once set, and they are both totally eye-clean.
  3. Hi everyone, I am looking for either a very well cut princess or cushion cut diamond. I actually bought this diamond ==> https://www.jamesallen.com/loose-diamonds/princess-cut/0.66-carat-e-color-vs1-clarity-sku-5932429 but also saw this diamond here today==> https://www.jamesallen.com/loose-diamonds/cushion-cut/0.72-carat-h-color-vs2-clarity-sku-3317062. Both has AGS 0 light performance but the cushion cut is marketed as True Heart. I ordered the princess cut because it looks really nice to me compared to other princess cut within the same carat weight. Need some expert advice please. Thanks heaps.
  4. Last week
  5. davidelevi

    Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

    Congratulations! May you both enjoy the ring for a long time to come.
  6. mlm123

    Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

    Thanks for the feedback! I took your advice and visited a local appraiser. He graded the stone as G and clarity VS2. He mentioned the prongs look new and the diamond is well set, the crown and shank appear to be from the 40s or 50s. Looks like its been resized more than once , the shank is thin on the bottom. He suggested adding material to the lower shank to be safe. I appreciate the advice. I think she'll love the ring, and I'm comfortable that I got a fair deal.
  7. denverappraiser

    Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

    Age can’t be told from a photo either, and that general style has been around for decades. For what the the clue is worth, those egl cards are almost always done for large dealers and it’s usually done as part of the manufacturing process. They see ‘new’ things for that particular service. That one was done in 2017.
  8. davidelevi

    Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

    The best way of getting a reliable estimate of "likely value" is to get an expert appraiser working for you to see it... my advice is worth more or less how much you pay for it, even though it is given in good faith. Ignore - totally - the "value" conclusion on the EGL piece of plastic; all it will do is to cause you to spend more money in insurance premiums. The basic design of the setting is a very common style since at least the 1930s. Judging from the plated 14 kt gold and some fairly crude detailing (sorry), it's unlikely to be that old - but it could be 2 months, 2 years or 20 years old. Or more.
  9. mlm123

    Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

    I appreciate you weighing in. I understand grading is impossible by looking at a few pics, I figure expert eyes may be able to spot something problematic. I paid a bit less than the asking ($1830), if likely value is within a couple hundred bucks either way, I'm happy, as long as she likes it.... Also curious as to the age, I'd love to hear opinions if someone recognizes the setting or design.
  10. davidelevi

    Ebay engagement ring purchase opinions

    Grading something via photos is not just difficult. It's impossible. The grading report's unreliability and lack of information (is the stone fluorescent?) doesn't help. In turn, this means it's impossible to say much about the price. A setting like that one will probably cost you $800 or so, including setting work. Let's take it out, and you are left with $1,200 for the centre stone. You can get a GIA-graded 0.70 E/VS1 for $1,500 (or twice that price... depending on cut, fluorescence and finish), so it's definitely not a super-bargain. Is it a rip-off? Well, that depends on what you have. Playing the "EGL usually grades 1-2 grades loose" game gets you to a G-H/VS2, which means you could have probably bought "something" of the same size, colour and clarity new for the same price. Or you could have spent $500 more and guaranteed you got a really nicely cut stone (this one doesn't seem bad, but again it's difficult to say from still photos - nice ones, BTW, well done!). Drawing the "EGL can be a total disaster, 6 grades off in colour and 3 in clarity" (and it can be) card leaves you in a bad place from an 'egg-on-your-face' point of view, but "only" $300 or so out-of-pocket compared to buying a new ring. Fortunately smaller stones aren't that sensitive to colour and clarity (both in terms of appearance and price). So: if you like it, you probably didn't win the lottery, but you didn't lose badly either. If you don't like it, return it without fearing that it's a "never to be seen again opportunity".
  11. I'm a self educated Gemologist, meaning I read a bunch of internet articles and watched Youtube videos for a couple weeks . I found a ring that fit my fiancés style preferences and bought a ring on ebay. ( that fit my modest budget). The downer is the EGL USA cert, no GIA. Opinions on price, grading accuracy or issues with the stone or setting most welcome. I assume the E-F/VS1 grading is off a grade or 2, it is eye clean. I do have a 30 day return period with @ 3 weeks left. https://www.ebay.com/itm/0-78-ct-14K-White-Gold-Emerald-Baguette-Cut-Diamond-Engagement-Ring-EGL-USA-/253568064839?_trksid=p2047675.m43663.l10137&nordt=true&rt=nc&orig_cvip=true I took the pics with the black background, the remainder are from the ebay ad.
  12. Earlier
  13. denverappraiser

    Review of 1.60ct GIA/SI2/E round cut

    Well, the definition of I-1 includes things that affect the beauty or durability of the stone so, theoretically, no. In reality, it's more like 'it depends'. That's why SI2s are cheaper than SI1s. I've heard a rule that the prettiest flowers grow on the edge of the cliff. As Davide points out, the only real way to answer this question is by looking at it, which it sounds like you have done. Perhaps someone else can also go in with you and take a peek and, I presume, the seller has looked. FWIW, my wife's diamond is an eye clean I-1. That's the edge of the cliff. This is what's called a 'mind clean' problem. It's important, but it's not really a gemological question. If it bugs you, even in concept, move up in clarity. If you choke on the price, move down in color and/or size to compensate.
  14. njkf88

    Review of 1.60ct GIA/SI2/E round cut

    denverappraiser can feathers like those seen in the plot for this diamond affect the brilliance at all? Or is the key concern that it is eye-clean. It looked good to me but the SI2 grading is gnawing away at me, as I'm worried I may have missed something! It's a big decision, and so I am wondering whether to go for a better clarity for peace of mind...
  15. denverappraiser

    Review of 1.60ct GIA/SI2/E round cut

    Davide. In 40 years of jewelry, I don't think I've ever seen a customer deliberately grease up a stone just to see what it looks like. It's not that this is an especially bad idea, but do make sure the salesperson is on board before doing this. Someone with heart trouble may be at risk. SI2 gets a bad rap on the Internet and I'm finding myself increasingly irritated when I hear people mention Rarecarat. It's not that they're necessarily wrong as much as these 'advisors' are commission salespeople who have NO additional information to impart. Sometimes the sellers don't either, but sometimes they do, and at least they're usually upfront about their position. You are much better off calling THEM to see if they have something to add.
  16. davidelevi

    Review of 1.60ct GIA/SI2/E round cut

    In short - no. The "cleanness" of the plot tells you very little as to the severity and visibility of the inclusions. It's provided to help you identify the characteristics and thus the stone, not to say whether there is a lot or a little. The SI2/I1 grade is supposed to provide indications about the integrity, not the amount of ink on the plot. 😉 I could show you I1 plots that look "cleaner" than the one we are talking about, and SI2 plots that look totally clean - yet are awful in reality, and vice versa ("Much ado about nothing"). But there are also awful I1 (and SI2) with plots that are practically "all red".
  17. njkf88

    Review of 1.60ct GIA/SI2/E round cut

    Thank you davidelevi for your prompt and informative response. That is very helpful. I didn't spot anything but that was 'blind', i.e. not knowing where the feathers were, so can see it again and follow your advice. It will be set in a 6 prong tiffany style setting. We are not particularly obsessive, and while I appreciate the GIA report provides very limited information, its more just my own (probably unfounded) prejudices about an SI2 grade that is gnawing at my mind i.e. am I missing something? Is it a risk? Feedback from someone on Rarecarat.com was that the plot looked very clean for an SI2 so it had them "slightly concerned". Is that something you would agree with?
  18. davidelevi

    Review of 1.60ct GIA/SI2/E round cut

    The primary concern is in terms of the visibility of the feathers - which unfortunately the report tells us nothing about. In-person observation - which you can do - is the only reliable test in this respect. In terms of durability, the fact that GIA decided to grade it SI2 rather than I1 means that they don't think the feathers pose significant risks to integrity and durability; again the report doesn't tell us very much (and I am not a setter!), but GIA makes generally good calls from this point of view. Couple of points to keep into account as you finalise your decision: 1. Things tend to become more visible over time - not because they change, but because our eye/brain system becomes more attuned to them. If you (your to-be-fiancée) tend to be the obsessive types, think carefully whether you want to go for an SI2. 2. A dirty stone (and it will get dirty) tends to show inclusions more easily - smear the pavilion with a little skin grease off your forehead or nose (or use hand cream if you are squeamish...) and see if things become "too apparent" that way. 3. Check the stone - clean and dirty - in different lighting environments: a jeweller's spotlights are great for making a stone look good, but they are not where you (it)'ll be for 99.99% of the time. Try some flat overhead /diffused lighting, fluorescent if possible, try natural light - both direct and indirect - and some very dim lighting (say under a desk). Try looking at things through the side as well, especially if your intended setting design is very "open" in that way. 4. Bear in mind that on the other hand setting the stone will make the inclusions more difficult to see. How much so depends on where the inclusions are, the shape/design of the setting and how skilled the setter is, so it's difficult to reassure you precisely in this respect, but it is generally true.
  19. Hi there. I am interested in some advice on a stone I have been looking at (1.60ct, SI2, E, triple excellent, round). The GIA report is available here: https://www.gia.edu/UK-EN/report-check?reportno=1186459168 I have viewed the stone a couple of times, and to my very untrained eye it looked eye-clean. I also had it next to a similar SI1 and I couldn't see any difference to be honest. I paid the initial deposit from a store in the UK, however, I was uneasy about its SI2 grading (despite not seeing anything myself) and since looking at the GIA report in more detail can see the presence of a few feathers. Would be grateful for your views on whether the GIA report would give you any cause for concern?
  20. davidelevi

    Looking For Online Store To Buy Proposal Rings?

    And despite the unfavourable reviews you purchased from them? And then you come here warning people about the risk of buying jewellery online? I don't think I follow.
  21. Amanda Brown

    Looking For Online Store To Buy Proposal Rings?

    Buying jewelry online may involve high risks. There are many e-retailers offering beautiful and valuable jewelry. But you can come across a lot of problems with customer service, delivery, refunds, etc. Therefore, it is very important to carry out an in-depth research to get a better insight of the seller. Before purchasing a necklace from Kay Jewelers I checked out Kay Jewelers reviews here https://kay-jewelers.pissedconsumer.com/review.html to become familiar with consumer’s feedback. A consumer advocacy platform is a very useful source of information today. The experience of real customers may help you avoid all hidden stones.
  22. davidelevi

    How Synthetic diamonds are made?

    Another one-miracle poster... or one post miracle...?
  23. denverappraiser

    How Synthetic diamonds are made?

    The hopes and dreams of young boys and girls are collected and distilled in a secret laboratory in Russia.
  24. davidelevi

    How Synthetic diamonds are made?

    They are made from carbon (plus, depending on desired size and colour, some nitrogen or boron) - same as natural diamonds. There are two basic methods of manufacturing that are commercially mature: High Pressure/High Temperature (HPHT), where graphite is subjected to very high pressures and temperatures and re-crystallises as diamond, possibly with the help of a "seed" diamond crystal Carbon Vapour Deposition (CVD), where carbon is vaporised in a vacuum chamber and allowed to deposit itself over a pre-existing (very small) diamond substrate, growing it into a larger crystal There are also very small diamonds being experimentally created using micro-explosions or magnetostriction/piezoelectric effects, but at the moment diamonds produced with these techniques are not usable for jewellery purposes (aside from production cost and reliability, they are just too small).
  25. Mason Martinez

    How Synthetic diamonds are made?

    How synthetic diamond are made from and the process?
  26. Headlight

    Clean your Diamonds especially in your engagement ring

    This is such a great point. For years I’ve had basket style mountings (been through a number of changes) and now I have a classic 6 prong solitaire style and all I can say is wow - much harder to keep things clean in between those prongs! I’m really going to have to stay on top of it! And I’m not one who puts on lotion or uses bar soap (only liquid, and not the conditioning ones), don’t shower with it, nor cook, etc. And it STILL is hard to clean!!!
  27. davidelevi

    Choosing between these 2 diamonds

    The link works - but it doesn't add much information, other than confirming that the stone is likely to be eye-clean at a first glance but if you look for the crystals you will find them (with good eyesight and lighting). The cut is not bad, but neither is it wonderful - as far as these things can be assessed from the video. Most importantly, there is no comparative information to the other stone, which still leaves you with the dilemma of what to choose.
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