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Table Vs. Depth


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#1 TheICEMan

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 07:56 PM

As I continue to research diamonds I tend to see similar advice throughout numerous sites...

I was recently on a site (can't remember which one) which stated "a good rule of thumb is to purchase a diamond where the table is NOT bigger than the depth. As I don't quite know all the intricacies of diamonds, I'm hoping some of you can tell me what this is all about, and if it's legitimate advice.

And please no "depending on what your looking for" responses! I understand diamonds are complex, but like 99% of the newbies on this site, I'm hoping to ultimately purchase a stone/ring which will look great and not break the bank!

Thank you guys!

Edited by TheICEMan, 02 April 2011 - 07:57 PM.


#2 davidelevi

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Posted 03 April 2011 - 03:00 AM

In general, even on a white, modern cut round it's not very useful as a rule of thumb. On a cut other than round and/or on a fancy colour stone, it's probably worse than not very useful, and it is positively misleading.

I'd much rather use - again, on a white modern cut round brilliant - a GIA or AGS cut grade. It takes into consideration many more factors, and as a consistent, synthetic indicator of a stone's proportion quality is as good as one can get today.

You don't want to hear it, but it does depend on what you are looking for. If what you want is a round diamond that "looks great", pick a stone that is graded on cut by GIA Excellent or Very Good, or an AGS 0-2. Colour and clarity optional, but probably clarity not lower than SI2 (or VS2 if you are buying totally sight unseen and don't want to risk having to return the stone). Then negotiate the best price you can. Don't go further than the lab cut grade; it will look more than good enough compared to a random pick not to let you down in any circumstances, and it simplifies the choosing task enormously. Here is one that fits these criteria, and it also happens to have a depth slightly smaller than its table. http://www.abazias.c...0809524&flag=dr

If what you want is the ne plus ultra of diamond cut, then that's the point where a "simple" cut grade (and indeed any information on a lab report) just won't do. It is also the point at which your personal preferences play a part. My "best diamond in the world" is not Laurie's (this just to pick a person here that seems to have tastes in cut rather different from mine), and probably not yours. For some people, it is very possible that "the best" will involve a table larger than depth.

Edited by davidelevi, 03 April 2011 - 03:54 AM.

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#3 denverappraiser

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Posted 03 April 2011 - 02:27 PM

I second what Davide has said above. I actually rather like small tables with tall crowns but this is a fairly unusual preference. The acceptable range is considerable. GIA 'excellent' can go as high as 62% and Tolkowski's 'ideal' was 53%. In an industry where people get compulsive over 1/10 of 1% on other attributes, that range is HUGE.
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#4 jan

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 06:44 AM

As I continue to research diamonds I tend to see similar advice throughout numerous sites...

I was recently on a site (can't remember which one) which stated "a good rule of thumb is to purchase a diamond where the table is NOT bigger than the depth. As I don't quite know all the intricacies of diamonds, I'm hoping some of you can tell me what this is all about, and if it's legitimate advice.

And please no "depending on what your looking for" responses! I understand diamonds are complex, but like 99% of the newbies on this site, I'm hoping to ultimately purchase a stone/ring which will look great and not break the bank!

Thank you guys!


It is a very general rule and like only looking at one thing on a car. Basically it is like saying, that I don't like when the windshield of the car is larger than that of the side windows.

You need to see the diamond. The total depth is just a number average that is obtained by measuring the diamond from the top of the table facet to the culet and dividing it into the average diameter which is 8 different numbers.

You can't tell how nice a diamond will look by measurements only.

I have a house that is 40 feet by 35 feet. Can you tell me what it looks like?
Jan
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